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Ketamine has much support in the use of hard-to-treat depression and suicidal behaviors. Below are studies and their links, including a meta-analysis, which demonstrate the effect of Ketamine. Also a recent trial by Carlos Zarate shows the heterogenous nature of response to Ketamine . It is difficult to say who is going to be lifted from their depression completely or partially respond, but in the study, Dr. Zarate showed that patients with a long history of suicidal thinking and self-harm will have less of a response in some cases.

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Intravenous ketamine may rapidly reduce suicidal thinking in depressed patients << Article link 

Intravenous ketamine may rapidly reduce suicidal thinking in depressed patients

Repeat intravenous treatment with low doses of the anesthetic drug ketamine quickly reduced suicidal thoughts in a small group of patients with treatment-resistant depression. In their report receiving Online First publication in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, a team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators report the results of their study in depressed outpatients who had been experiencing suicidal thought for three months or longer.

“Our finding that low doses of ketamine, when added on to current antidepressant medications, quickly decreased suicidal thinking in depressed patients is critically important because we don’t have many safe, effective, and easily available treatments for these patients,” says Dawn Ionescu, MD, of the Depression Clinical and Research Program in the MGH Department of Psychiatry, lead and corresponding author of the paper. “While several previous studies have shown that ketamine quickly decreases symptoms of depression in patients with treatment-resistant depression, many of them excluded patients with current suicidal thinking.”

It is well known that having suicidal thoughts increases the risk that patients will attempt suicide, and the risk for suicide attempts is 20 times higher in patients with depression than the general population. The medications currently used to treat patients with suicidal thinking — including lithium and clozapine — can have serious side effects, requiring careful monitoring of blood levels; and while electroconvulsive therapy also can reduce suicidal thinking, its availability is limited and it can have significant side effects, including memory loss.

Primarily used as a general anesthetic, ketamine has been shown in several studies to provide rapid relief of symptoms of depression. In addition to excluding patients who reported current suicidal thinking, many of those studies involved only a single ketamine dose. The current study was designed not only to examine the antidepressant and antisuicidal effects of repeat, low-dose ketamine infusions in depressed outpatients with suicidal thinking that persisted in spite of antidepressant treatment, but also to examine the safety of increased ketamine dosage.

The study enrolled 14 patients with moderate to severe treatment-resistant depression who had suicidal thoughts for three months or longer. After meeting with the research team three times to insure that they met study criteria and were receiving stable antidepressant treatment, participants received two weekly ketamine infusions over a three-week period. The initial dosage administered was 0.5 mg/kg over a 45 minute period — about five times less than a typical anesthetic dose — and after the first three doses, it was increased to 0.75 mg/kg. During the three-month follow-up phase after the ketamine infusions, participants were assessed every other week.

The same assessment tools were used at each visit before, during and after the active treatment phase. At the treatment visits they were administered about 4 hours after the infusions were completed. The assessments included validated measures of suicidal thinking, in which patients were directly asked to rank whether they had specific suicide-related thoughts, their frequency and intensity.

While only 12 of the 14 enrolled participants completed all treatment visits — one dropped out because of ketamine side effects and one had a scheduling conflict — most of them experienced a decrease in suicidal thinking, and seven achieved complete remission of suicidal thoughts at the end of the treatment period. Of those seven participants, two maintained remission from both suicidal thinking and depression symptoms throughout the follow-up period. While there were no serious adverse events at either dose and no major differences in side effects between the two dosage levels, additional studies in larger groups of patients are required before any conclusions can be drawn.

“In order to qualify for this study, patients had to have suicidal thinking for at least three months, along with persistent depression, so the fact that they experienced any reduction in suicidal thinking, let alone remission, is very exciting,” says Ionescu, who is an instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. “We only studied intravenous ketamine, but this result opens the possibility for studying oral and intranasal doses, which may ease administration for patients in suicidal crises.”

She adds, “One main limitation of our study was that all participants knew they were receiving ketamine. We are now finishing up a placebo-controlled study that we hope to have results for soon. Looking towards the future, studies that aim to understand the mechanism by which ketamine and its metabolites work for people with suicidal thinking and depression may help us discover areas of the brain to target with new, even better therapeutic drugs.”

 

Rapid and Sustained Reductions in Current Suicidal Ideation Following Repeated Doses of Intravenous Ketamine: Secondary Analysis of an Open-Label Study  << Article in Clinical Psychiatry

Ketamine for Rapid Reduction of Suicidal Thoughts in Major Depression: A Midazolam-Controlled Randomized Clinical Trial Article link for below:

Ketamine was significantly more effective than a commonly used sedative in reducing suicidal thoughts in depressed patients, according to researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). They also found that ketamine’s anti-suicidal effects occurred within hours after its administration.

The findings were published online last week in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, suicide rates in the U.S. increased by 26.5 percent between 1999 and 2015.

“There is a critical window in which depressed patients who are suicidal need rapid relief to prevent self-harm,” said Michael Grunebaum, MD, a research psychiatrist at CUMC, who led the study. “Currently available antidepressants can be effective in reducing suicidal thoughts in patients with depression, but they can take weeks to have an effect. Suicidal, depressed patients need treatments that are rapidly effective in reducing suicidal thoughts when they are at highest risk. Currently, there is no such treatment for rapid relief of suicidal thoughts in depressed patients.”

Most antidepressant trials have excluded patients with suicidal thoughts and behavior, limiting data on the effectiveness of antidepressants in this population. However, previous studies have shown that low doses of ketamine, an anesthetic drug, causes a rapid reduction in depression symptoms and may be accompanied by a decrease in suicidal thoughts.

The 80 depressed adults with clinically significant suicidal thoughts who enrolled in this study were randomly assigned to receive an infusion of low-dose ketamine or midazolam, a sedative. Within 24 hours, the ketamine group had a clinically significant reduction in suicidal thoughts that was greater than with the midazolam group. The improvement in suicidal thoughts and depression in the ketamine group appeared to persist for up to six weeks.

Those in the ketamine group also had greater improvement in overall mood, depression, and fatigue compared with the midazolam group. Ketamine’s effect on depression accounted for approximately one-third of its effect on suicidal thoughts, suggesting the treatment has a specific anti-suicidal effect.

Side effects, mainly dissociation (feeling spacey) and an increase in blood pressure during the infusion, were mild to moderate and typically resolved within minutes to hours after receiving ketamine.

“This study shows that ketamine offers promise as a rapidly acting treatment for reducing suicidal thoughts in patients with depression,” said Dr. Grunebaum. “Additional research to evaluate ketamine’s antidepressant and anti-suicidal effects may pave the way for the development of new antidepressant medications that are faster acting and have the potential to help individuals who do not respond to currently available treatments.”

Ketamine for Rapid Reduction of Suicidal Thoughts in major depression – A midazolam controlled trial PDF article

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Ketamine as a Potential Treatment for Suicidal Ideation A Systematic Review of the Literature 2015

Abstract
Objective To review the published literature on the efficacy
of ketamine for the treatment of suicidal ideation (SI).
Methods The PubMed and Cochrane databases were
searched up to January 2015 for clinical trials and case
reports describing therapeutic ketamine administration to
patients presenting with SI/suicidality. Searches were also
conducted for relevant background material regarding the
pharmacological function of ketamine.
Results Nine publications (six studies and three case
reports) met the search criteria for assessing SI after
administration of subanesthetic ketamine. There were no
studies examining the effect on suicide attempts or death
by suicide. Each study demonstrated a rapid and clinically
significant reduction in SI, with results similar to previously
described data on ketamine and treatment-resistant
depression. A total of 137 patients with SI have been
reported in the literature as receiving therapeutic ketamine.
Seven studies delivered a dose of 0.5 mg/kg intravenously
over 40 min, while one study administered a 0.2 mg/kg
intravenous bolus and another study administered a liquid
suspension. The earliest significant results were seen after
40 min, and the longest results were observed up to
10 days postinfusion.
Conclusion Consistent with clinical research on ketamine
as a rapid and effective treatment for depression, ketamine
has shown early preliminary evidence of a reduction in
depressive symptoms, as well as reducing SI, with minimal
short-term side effects. Additional studies are needed to
further investigate its mechanism of action, long-term
outcomes, and long-term adverse effects (including abuse)
and benefits. In addition, ketamine could potentially be
used as a prototype for further development of rapid-acting
antisuicidal medication with a practical route of administration
and the most favorable risk/benefit ratio.
Key Points
Preliminary data from randomized controlled trials
have demonstrated that ketamine may rapidly and
effectively control treatment-resistant depression,
though the effects are transient.
A small subset of studies has demonstrated similar
results in the effects of ketamine on suicidal ideation.
Ketamine has potential as a rapid treatment for
suicidal ideation and/or a possible model compound
for future drug development.

4 Discussion
With an estimated prevalence of mood disorders ranging
from 3.3 to 21.4 % and the substantially increased risk of
suicide among patients with mood disorders, treatment is
certainly warranted [19]. Current treatment options for
suicidality are limited. They include brain stimulation
therapeutics, such as ECT, and pharmacological intervention
(lithium, clozapine). The efficacy of lithium in treating
suicidality has been documented [20, 21] and has recently been reviewed and pooled in a recent meta-analysis of 48
studies [22]. Clozapine has also been shown to reduce
suicide risk in patients with schizophrenia [23, 24]. The
limitations of both lithium and clozapine include a longer
time to efficacy in this psychiatric emergency/urgency,
compared with the early response to ketamine [25]. Ketamine
seems to be gaining substantial evidence as a pharmacological
option for depression with a fast onset of
action, but its long-term effects need further investigation.
In addition, ketamine probably offers a faster onset of
action in terms of SI, but further work is certainly needed
in this area. Given the risk of suicide and even the
increasing rates of suicide in certain subgroups, such as
soldiers and veterans [26, 27], there is an urgent need for
faster therapeutics for SI and TRD. Importantly, suicidality
and suicide pose a high global burden of patient suffering
to families and society. Although several small-to-moderate
sized studies, in addition to several reviews, have been
published that have examined the efficacy of ketamine in
TRD, there are considerably fewer published data
specifically examining ketamine in patients presenting with
SI. Notably, only three studies have directly examined SI
as the primary outcome [11, 16, 17], while the rest
examined SI as the secondary outcome [4, 15, 18], not
including case reports. This review summarizes the current
published literature regarding ketamine as a treatment for
SI. The data so far show promising trends of ketamine
being an effective and rapid treatment with minimal side
effects.
Pharmacologically, ketamine is an N-methyl-D-aspartate
(NMDA) receptor antagonist. It has been used for anesthesia
in the USA since the 1970s. At subanesthetic doses,
ketamine has been shown to increase glutamate levels [3].
This mechanism is relevant, as glutamate regulation and
expression are altered in patients with major depressive
disorder (MDD). Studies have also demonstrated an
abnormal glutamate–glutamine–gamma-aminobutyric acid
cycle in patients with suicidality [28]. Furthermore, ketamine
has also been shown to work on nicotinic and opioid
receptors [29]. No other class of antidepressant medication
works to modulate the glutamatergic system, and research
continues into this, with the goal of characterizing the full
mechanism of action of ketamine and perhaps developing
other compounds that would have similar effects. Thus,
even if the approval and marketing of ketamine as a rapidacting
antisuicidal and antidepressant medication is not
realized, it could well be a prototype for development of
other medication(s) that retain the mechanism of action
with more favorable qualities and a lesser adverse effect
profile (such as a longer duration of action or less or no
addictive potential). Although the mechanisms explaining
the antisuicidal effect and the NMDA receptor antagonism
of ketamine are still unclear, some of the initial evidence
points to an anti-inflammatory action via the kynurenic
acid pathway. Strong suggestions as to the causal relationship
between inflammation and depression/suicidality
has come from studies demonstrating that cytokines [30,
31] and interferon-b [32] induce depression and suicidality.
Other recent studies have added to the notion of implicating
brain immune activation in the pathogenesis of suicidality.
For instance, one study showed microglial
activation of postmortem brain tissue in suicide victims
[33]. Another study found increased levels of the cytokine
interleukin-6 in cerebrospinal fluid from patients who had
attempted suicide [34]. Higher levels of inflammatory
markers have been shown in suicidal patients than in nonsuicidal
depressed patients [33, 35]. Inflammation leads to
production of both quinolinic acid (an NMDA agonist) and
kynurenic acid (a NMDA antagonist). An increased
quinolinic acid to kynurenic acid ratio leads to NMDA
receptor stimulation. The correlation between quinolinic
acid and Suicide Intent Scale scores indicates that changes
in glutamatergic neurotransmission could be specifically
linked to suicidality [36].
Small randomized controlled trials have demonstrated
the efficacy of ketamine in rapidly treating patients with
both TRD and/or bipolar depression [4, 8, 9, 11, 16–18].
Some studies have also examined suicide items as a secondary
measure in their depression rating scales [4, 7]. In
total, the studies examining ketamine and TRD have nearly
consistently demonstrated that ketamine provides relief
from depressive and suicidal symptoms, starting at 40 min
and lasting for as long as 5 days. Questions still remain as
to the long-term effects of this treatment, how much should
be administered and how often, any serious adverse effects,
and the mechanism of action.
Pharmacologically, ketamine has poor bioavailability
and is best administered via injection [37]. In their landmark
study, Berman et al. [4] found that a subanesthetic
dose (0.5 mg/kg) rapidly improved depressive symptoms.
Most of the subsequent studies have delivered ketamine as
a constant infusion for 40 min at a rate of 0.5 mg/kg.
Others have examined its efficacy after multiple infusions
and observed similar results [8, 13, 16, 38]. Currently, it is
recommended that ketamine be administered in a hospital
setting [39].

______________________________________

Characterizing the course of suicidal ideation response to ketamine

Characterizing the course of suicidal ideation response to ketamine PDF

2018 article from Carlos Zarate discussing the variable course outcomes with Ketamine for suicidality and correlations to serum markers and behavior and longevity of self-harm prior to treatment:

 

Background: : No pharmacological treatments exist for active suicidal ideation (SI), but the glutamatergic
modulator ketamine elicits rapid changes in SI. We developed data-driven subgroups of SI trajectories after
ketamine administration, then evaluated clinical, demographic, and neurobiological factors that might predict SI
response to ketamine.
Methods: : Data were pooled from five clinical ketamine trials. Treatment-resistant inpatients (n = 128) with
DSM-IV-TR-diagnosed major depressive disorder (MDD) or bipolar depression received one subanesthetic
(0.5 mg/kg) ketamine infusion over 40 min. Composite SI variable scores were analyzed using growth mixture
modeling to generate SI response classes, and class membership predictors were evaluated using multinomial
logistic regressions. Putative predictors included demographic variables and various peripheral plasma markers.
Results: : The best-fitting growth mixture model comprised three classes: Non-Responders (29%), Responders
(44%), and Remitters (27%). For Responders and Remitters, maximal improvements were achieved by Day 1.
Improvements in SI occurred independently of improvements in a composite Depressed Mood variable for
Responders, and partially independently for Remitters. Indicators of chronic SI and self-injury were associated
with belonging to the Non-Responder group. Higher levels of baseline plasma interleukin-5 (IL-5) were linked to
Remitters rather than Responders.
Limitations: : Subjects were not selected for active suicidal thoughts; findings only extend to Day 3; and plasma,
rather than CSF, markers were used.
Conclusion: : The results underscore the heterogeneity of SI response to ketamine and its potential independence
from changes in Depressed Mood. Individuals reporting symptoms suggesting a longstanding history of chronic
SI were less likely to respond or remit post-ketamine.

1. Introduction
Suicide poses a serious threat to public health. Worldwide, suicide
accounts for approximately 1 million deaths, and 10 million suicide
attempts are reported annually (World Health Organization, 2014). In
the United States, the national suicide rate has increased by approximately
28% over the last 15 years (Curtin et al., 2016). At the same
time, relatively few interventions for suicide risk exist. While treatments
such as clozapine and lithium have demonstrated effects on
suicidal behavior over weeks to months, these effects may be limited to
specific diagnoses (Cipriani et al., 2005; Griffiths et al., 2014). Currently,
no FDA-approved medications exist to treat suicidal ideation
(SI), leaving those who experience a suicidal crisis with limited options
for a reprieve of symptoms. Consequently, a critical need exists for
rapid-acting treatments that can be used in emergency settings.
A promising off-label agent for this purpose is the rapid-acting antidepressant
ketamine, which past studies have suggested reduces suicidal
thoughts (Diazgranados et al., 2010a; Murrough et al., 2015; Price
et al., 2009). A recent meta-analysis of 167 patients with a range of
mood disorder diagnoses found that ketamine reduced suicidal
thoughts compared to placebo as rapidly as within a few hours, with
effects lasting as long as seven days (Wilkinson et al., 2017). These
results are reinforced by newer findings of reduced active suicidal
ideation post-ketamine compared to a midazolam control(Grunebaum et al., 2018). As the efficacy literature develops in the era
of personalized medicine, two important issues must be addressed.
First, little is known about the acute course of SI following ketamine.
The speed with which antidepressant response occurs, and how much
improvement can be expected on average, has been documented for
single administrations of ketamine (Mathew et al., 2012; Sanacora
et al., 2017); in the limited available literature, researchers have
emulated previous studies examining antidepressant effect, where a
cutoff of 50% improvement demarcated response (Nierenberg and
DeCecco, 2001). Nevertheless, it remains unknown whether this categorization
accurately reflects the phenomenon of suicidal thoughts.
Empirically-derived approaches to the description of SI trajectory after
ketamine may be useful in operationalizing “response” in future clinical
trials.
Second, identifying demographic, clinical, or biological predictors
of SI response to ketamine would allow researchers and clinicians to
determine who is most likely to exhibit an SI response to ketamine. A
broad literature describes clinical and demographic predictors for suicide
risk (Franklin et al., 2017), and a smaller literature connects suicidal
thoughts and behaviors to plasma markers such as brain-derived
neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cytokines (Bay-Richter et al., 2015;
Falcone et al., 2010; Isung et al., 2012; Serafini et al., 2017; Serafini
et al., 2013). However, no biomarkers have been shown to predict SI/
behavior response to intervention, a finding reinforced by the National
Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention’s Research Prioritization Task
Force’s Portfolio Analysis (National Action Alliance for Suicide
Prevention: Research Prioritization Task Force, 2015). Notably, predictor
analyses have the potential to reveal insights into personalized
treatments for suicidal individuals, as well as the neurobiology of SI
response. With respect to antidepressant response, for example, this
approach yielded the observation that individuals with a family history
of alcohol dependence may be more likely to exhibit an antidepressant
response to ketamine (Krystal et al., 2003; Niciu et al., 2014; PermodaOsip
et al., 2014).
The goals of this study were to elucidate trajectories of SI response
and identify predictors of that response, with the ultimate goal of
adding to the growing literature surrounding ketamine’s specific effects
on SI. In particular, we sought to determine whether the heterogeneous
patterns of change in SI after ketamine administration were better explained
by a model with two or more latent groups of trajectories rather
than a single average trajectory, using secondary analyses from previously
published clinical trials. These classes were then used to evaluate
potential clinical, demographic, and plasma biomarker predictors
of SI response to ketamine in order to generate hypotheses.. Discussion
This analysis used a data-driven approach to characterize SI response
to ketamine. The data were best explained by three trajectory
classes: one with severe average baseline SI and little to no response to
ketamine (Non-Responders), one with moderate average baseline levels
of SI and significant response to ketamine (Responders), and a third
with moderate average baseline levels of SI and complete remission of
SI by two days post-ketamine (Remitters). These findings suggest a
diversity of post-ketamine changes in SI that may not be captured under
traditional methods of categorizing response to treatment.
Furthermore, we found evidence that SI response and antidepressant
response could be distinguished from each other; one subset of participants
experienced improvement in SI that was partially explained by
improvements in Depressed Mood, while the other group’s improvements
in SI occurred independently of antidepressant response. With
regard to predictors of SI response trajectory, preliminary results suggest
the individuals least likely to experience improvement in SI postketamine
were those with the most severe SI and a history of self-injury.
Few plasma markers emerged as predictors of SI response in this study,
highlighting the limitations of connecting SI ratings of response with
biological markers.
The growth mixture modeling approach used here underscored the
heterogeneity of SI response to ketamine, which would not have been
captured by simply calculating the average trajectory. The class assignment
from this approach also differed from the definition of response
(50% reduction in symptoms) traditionally used in the antidepressant
literature, which often focuses on a specific timepoint rather
than the entire symptom trajectory. In comparing classification using a
50% response at Day 1 and Day 3 with the latent trajectory classes, we
found representation of almost every SI class across each responder
group, highlighting the potential limitations of the 50% response approach.
Further study is needed to determine which of these approaches
will prove more fruitful. Complete remission of SI has previously been
used as an outcome measure in clinical trials and in a meta-analysis of
ketamine’s efficacy (Grunebaum et al., 2017; Grunebaum et al., 2018;
Wilkinson et al., 2017), as well as in a study examining the relationship
between SI response to ketamine and changes in nocturnal wakefulness
(Vande Voort et al., 2017). One strength of the present study is that this
data-driven approach provides classifications that directly reflect the
phenomena under study as they are, as opposed to what they should be.
Especially when used in larger samples than the current study, this
approach is particularly promising in its ability to provide a more
nuanced understanding of the nature of SI response to ketamine.
Our results also support the idea that SI response in particular can target. First, it should be noted here that SI classes were not distinguishable
by baseline Depressed Mood scores; patients with the most
severe SI did not differ meaningfully in Depressed Mood scores from
those with the mildest SI. Second, while previous analyses of these data
documented that BMI and family history of alcohol dependence predicted
antidepressant response (Niciu et al., 2014), SI response was not
associated with these variables in the current analysis. Third, the antidepressant
response profiles of the SI classes suggest that SI response
and antidepressant response are not wholly redundant. This aligns with
previous clinical trials and meta-analytic reviews of the literature suggesting
that SI response to ketamine occurs partially independently of
antidepressant response (Grunebaum et al., 2018; Wilkinson et al.,
2017). Nevertheless, this independence did not hold true across both SI
response groups. Specifically, antidepressant and SI response were
clearly linked in Remitters, with depression accounting for half of the
changes in SI; however, in Responders, improvements in SI occurred
independently from improvements in Depressed Mood. These discrepancies
could be related to ketamine’s complex neurobiological
mechanisms or to the potentially low levels of clinical severity observed
in the Remitters.
Interestingly, the current analyses found no baseline demographic
variables that reliably distinguished Responders from Remitters. Some
phenotypic characteristics were uniquely associated with belonging to
the Non-Responder group, suggesting that a long-standing history of
self-injury or SI may indicate resistance to rapid changes in SI.
Relatedly, a recent, randomized clinical trial of repeat-dose ketamine
compared to placebo found that ketamine had no effect on SI in a
sample of patients selected for their longstanding, chronic history of SI
(Ionescu, 2017). These results highlight the importance of patient selection,
particularly for suicide risk. It should be stressed, however, that
SI does not necessarily translate to suicidal attempts or deaths; to our
knowledge, no study has yet linked ketamine with reduced risk of
suicidal behavior. Indeed, in the present study the SI Non-Responders
experienced limited antidepressant effects in response to ketamine, but
may nevertheless have improved on other, unmeasured symptoms that
could provide important benefit and relief. As the ketamine literature
develops, it will be important to identify which clinical symptom profiles
are most likely to have a robust anti-SI and anti-suicidal behavior
response to ketamine and which ones may benefit from other interventions.
While we evaluated a range of potential plasma markers previously
linked to suicidal ideation and behavior, in the present analysis only IL5
was associated with the SI Responder subgroup. Ketamine is known to
have anti-inflammatory effects (Zunszain et al., 2013), but the relationship
between antidepressant response and change in cytokine
levels remains unclear (Park et al., 2017). Cytokines have been linked
to suicidal behavior in the past; a recent meta-analysis found that lower
levels of IL-2 and IL-4, and higher levels of TGFbeta, were associated
with suicidal thoughts and behaviors (Serafini et al., 2013); however, toour knowledge IL-5 has not previously been linked to SI. Given the large
number of comparisons and lack of precedent in the literature, this
result may have been spurious and should be interpreted with caution.
A number of other results may reflect meaningful relationships, but the
high degree of variability—and the associated wide confidence intervals—suggests
that larger sample sizes are needed to better elucidate
the nature of any such relationships (e.g. baseline VEGF: χ2 = 6.13,
p = .05, but OR (95% CI) 13.33 (0.93–200.00)). Somewhat surprisingly,
plasma BDNF levels were not associated with responder class.
Previous studies of bipolar, but not MDD, samples found that plasma
BDNF levels were associated with SI response after ketamine
(Grunebaum, 2017; Grunebaum et al., 2017), suggesting that the mixed
diagnostic composition of this study may explain differences from
previous work. Studies exploring the relationship between BDNF and
antidepressant response to ketamine have also yielded mixed findings
(Haile et al., 2014; Machado-Vieira et al., 2009). Other data-driven
approaches have considered both biological and behavioral variables in
characterizing depression (Drysdale et al., 2017); a similar approach
might prove useful for predicting SI response.
The present study is associated with several strengths as well as
limitations. Strengths include the relatively large sample size of participants
who received ketamine, the use of composite SI scores from
previous exploratory factor analyses as opposed to individual items,
and the combination of clinical and biological markers as potential
predictors of class membership. Limitations include patient selection
methods, as these patients were part of an antidepressant trial and were
not selected for active suicidal thoughts, as well as the exploratory
nature of the analysis. As stated above, suicidal thoughts do not necessarily
equate to suicidal behavior, and class membership would thus
not necessarily correspond with an overall reduction in suicide risk.
Another limitation is that results were collapsed across several clinical
trials with slight variations in study design, and findings were thus only
extended to Day 3 rather than a week after ketamine administration. As
a result, only a subset of the sample could be used for predictive analyses.
In addition, plasma—rather than CSF—markers were used, and
the latter might better indicate underlying biology due to proximity to
the brain, though certain markers such as plasma BDNF may be related
to platelet storage, rather than the brain (Chacón-Fernández et al.,
2016). Comparison of results to trajectories of suicide-specific measures,
such as the Scale for Suicide Ideation (Beck et al., 1979), may also
give further insight into specific SI content. Finally, many clinical
predictors were collected upon hospital admission; future analyses
could use formal assessments, such as the Childhood Traumatic Questionnaire
(Bernstein et al., 1994), assessment of personality disorders,
or diagnoses such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as potential
indicators of response.
Despite these limitations, the study demonstrates the utility of a
data-driven approach for characterizing the heterogeneity of SI response
to a rapid-acting intervention. This allows for a more finegrained
analysis of symptoms than would be permitted by traditionalapproaches, such as overall average response or dichotomization at
50% reduction in symptoms. This study identified several findings of
note. These included distinguishing at least three patterns of SI response
to ketamine and finding that subjects who exhibited more severe SI at
baseline were not likely to experience an SI response to ketamine.

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http://www.suboxonecenter.org/ Suboxone treatment – telemedicine also – 703-844-0184 24/7

 

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Blocking microglial pannexin-1 channels alleviates morphine withdrawal symptoms

Opiates are essential for treating pain, but termination of
opiate therapy can cause a debilitating withdrawal syndrome
in chronic users. To alleviate or avoid the aversive symptoms
of withdrawal, many of these individuals continue to use
opiates1–4. Withdrawal is therefore a key determinant of opiate
use in dependent individuals, yet its underlying mechanisms
are poorly understood and effective therapies are lacking. Here,
we identify the pannexin-1 (Panx1) channel as a therapeutic
target in opiate withdrawal. We show that withdrawal from
morphine induces long-term synaptic facilitation in lamina I
and II neurons within the rodent spinal dorsal horn, a principal
site of action for opiate analgesia. Genetic ablation of Panx1
in microglia abolished the spinal synaptic facilitation and
ameliorated the sequelae of morphine withdrawal. Panx1
is unique in its permeability to molecules up to 1 kDa in size
and its release of ATP5,6. We show that Panx1 activation
drives ATP release from microglia during morphine withdrawal
and that degrading endogenous spinal ATP by administering
apyrase produces a reduction in withdrawal behaviors.
Conversely, we found that pharmacological inhibition of
ATP breakdown exacerbates withdrawal. Treatment with
a Panx1-blocking peptide (10panx) or the clinically used
broad-spectrum Panx1 blockers, mefloquine or probenecid,
suppressed ATP release and reduced withdrawal severity.
Our results demonstrate that Panx1-mediated ATP release
from microglia is required for morphine withdrawal in rodents
and that blocking Panx1 alleviates the severity of withdrawal
without affecting opiate analgesia. 

Could This Inexpensive Medication Reduce Your Withdrawal Symptoms?

Could This Inexpensive Medication Reduce Your Withdrawal Symptoms?

Withdrawal. It’s a huge hurdle on the path to recovery.

Those struggling to leave opioids behind know they’ll eventually have to face the intimidating mental and physical effects of withdrawal. It’s a powerful and frightening thought.

Some of the most common withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Muscle aches and cramps
  • Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea
  • Anxiety, profuse sweating, and restlessness
  • Blurry vision
  • High blood pressure

Help Where It’s Needed Most

Even though millions of Americans are in the midst of this battle, few medications are available to effectively manage their symptoms. This unavailability – and the onset of painful withdrawal symptoms – are often enough to make many people give up and return to opioids for relief.

But this could soon change…

According to the results of a recent study, help for intense withdrawal symptoms might be on the horizon, thanks to the discovery of a new drug.

“Opioid withdrawal is aversive, debilitating, and can compel individuals to continue using the drug in order to prevent these symptoms,” explains lead researcher Tuan Trang, PhD.

“In our study, we effectively alleviated withdrawal symptoms in rodents, which could have important implications for patients that may wish to decrease or stop their use of these medications.”

The Study

Researchers from the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Hotchkiss Brain Institute investigated the process of withdrawal and its’ possible causes. The study involved rats which had been given two potent opioids, morphine and fentanyl. The team identified the glycoprotein, pannexin-1, as the source of withdrawal symptoms in rodents. Pannexin-1 is also located throughout the human body, including the brain and spinal cord.

After identifying the cause of these symptoms, the team tested a drug already proven to block the effects of pannexin-1 called, Probenecid. It’s an anti-gout medication that’s fairly cheap and has few side effects.

The results showed this medicine was “effective in reducing the severity of withdrawal symptoms in opioid-dependent rodents.” Another encouraging aspect about their findings: the medication didn’t affect an opioids’ ability to relieve pain.

Previous research hadn’t explored this avenue, and this investigation has provided a better understanding of opioid withdrawal at the cellular level.

The Implications

Canadian pain researcher, Dr. Michael Salter, notes, “This is an exciting study which reveals a new mechanism and a potential therapeutic target for managing opioid withdrawal. The findings of Dr. Trang and his team could have important implications for people on opioid therapy and those attempting to stop opioid use.”

The team behind the study plan to continue their work and hope this new insight will lead to the creation of a more effective treatment method for the symptoms of withdrawal. Dr. Trang says their next steps will be to determine the drug effectiveness in humans and to ensure its’ safety. Their goal is to develop an effective method to treat the millions struggling with pain management and opioid dependency across the nation and around the world.

These results have already lead to the development of a clinical trial at the Calgary Pain Clinic.

 

FDA approves first medication to reduce opioid withdrawal symptoms

Announcement

May 16, 2018

LofexidineCourtesy of US WorldMeds, LLC.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health, is pleased to announce that lofexidine, the first medication for use in reducing symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal in adults, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Lofexidine, an oral tablet, is designed to manage the symptoms patients often experience during opioid discontinuation. Opioid withdrawal symptoms, which can begin as early as a few hours after the drug was last taken, may include aches and pains, muscle spasms/twitching, stomach cramps, muscular tension, heart pounding, insomnia/problems sleeping, feelings of coldness, runny eyes, yawning, and feeling sick, among others. The product will be marketed under the brand name LUCEMYRATM.

In 2016, more than 42,000 people died from an opioid overdose, or approximately 115 people per day. Although effective treatments exist for opioid addiction, painful and difficult withdrawal is one of the reasons treatment fails, and relapse occurs. By alleviating symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal, LUCEMYRA could help patients complete their discontinuation of opioids and facilitate successful treatment. To date, no other medications have been approved to treat opioid withdrawal symptoms.

LUCEMYRA will be marketed by US WorldMeds, a specialty pharmaceutical company that acquired a license for lofexidine from Britannia Pharmaceuticals in 2003. NIDA provided funding to US WorldMeds to support clinical trials to document the clinical pharmacokinetics of lofexidine and to test medical safety and efficacy of the medication, as compared to a placebo, among patients undergoing medically supervised opioid discontinuation. LUCEMYRA is expected to be commercially available in the United States in August 2018.

Read FDA press release: FDA approves the first non-opioid treatment for management of opioid withdrawal symptoms in adults

Read NIDA Director Dr. Nora Volkow’s blog: NIDA-Supported Science Leads to First FDA-Approved Medication for Opioid Withdrawal

For more information about opioids, go to the Opioids webpage. For information about treatment approaches for drug addiction, go to Treatment Approaches for Drug Addiction.

Medication for Opioid Withdrawal

 

May 16, 2018

Image of drug Lucemyra (Lofexidine)Courtesy of US WorldMeds, LLC

In 2016, 115 Americans died every day from an overdose involving prescription or illicit opioids. Addiction to any drug has multiple components—altered functioning of the reward system, learned associations with drug cues that promote preoccupation and craving, and changes to prefrontal circuits necessary for proper exertion of self-control. But physiological and psychological withdrawal symptoms play a major role in driving users repeatedly back to the drug, despite efforts to stop using.

Withdrawal is notoriously hard to endure for people addicted to opioids. Physical symptoms can start a few hours after last taking the drug and may include stomach cramps, aches and pains, coldness, muscle spasms or tension, pounding heart, insomnia, and many others. These symptoms, along with mood changes, like depression and anxiety, are a major reason people with opioid addiction may relapse. Yet until now, no medication has been approved to treat withdrawal.

This week, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved lofexidine, the first medication targeted specifically to treat the physical symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal. NIDA’s medications development program helped fund the science leading to the drug’s approval. Lofexidine could benefit the thousands of Americans seeking medical help for their opioid addiction, by helping them stick to their detoxification or treatment regimens.

Two of the three FDA-approved medications to treat opioid use disorder, methadone and buprenorphine, can be initiated while a person is experiencing withdrawal symptoms, and can help curb craving. However, these medications are not always easy to access, and at this point are only received by a minority of people with opioid use disorder. The third FDA-approved drug, extended-release naltrexone, has also been found effective, but only after people have been fully detoxified.  The need to detox first—and endure those symptoms—prevents many patients from being treated with naltrexone. Lofexidine could make a big difference in making the latter treatment option more widely used.

New Nonopioid Med Blunts Drug Withdrawal Symptoms  < Medscape

Lofexidine is not an opioid. It acts to inhibit the release of norepinephrine in the brain and elsewhere in the nervous system. It was originally developed as a medication for hypertension, but has mainly been used for opioid withdrawal in the United Kingdom since the early 1990s. US WorldMeds acquired a license for lofexidine from Britannia Pharmaceuticals in 2003 and will market it in the US under the brand name LUCEMYRATM beginning this summer. NIDA helped fund the clinical trials to test lofexidine’s pharmacological properties, safety, and efficacy in patients who were discontinuing opioid use under medical supervision.

Lofexidine cannot address the psychological symptoms of opioid withdrawal; further research is needed to develop medications that could address mood problems during detoxification and after. But approval of the first medication to treat the physical symptoms of opioid withdrawal is a major milestone, one that could improve the lives and treatment success of thousands of people living with opioid addiction. And by helping prevent relapse, it could save lives. The approval of lofexidine is also a welcome example of the power of public-private collaborations in developing new treatments.

MIAMI — Lofexidine (Lucemyra, US Worldmeds), which has been in use in the United Kingdom for more than 20 years, is now
available in the United States. The drug is used in the management of symptoms of severe opioid withdrawal.
Dr Danesh Alam
In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial in opioid-dependent patients, lofexidine significantly improved opioid
withdrawal symptoms and significantly increased completion of a 7-day opioid discontinuation treatment program compared with
placebo.
“We desperately need something to address the opioid crisis, where we are losing about 100 Americans every day, with some
16 million on opioids,” Danesh Alam, MD, Northwestern Medicine Central Dupage Hospital, Winfield, Illinois, told Medscape
Medical News.
“Now we have a drug that actually enables us to achieve a rapid withdrawal from opioids. When we use lofexidine, we can
literally bring in someone using opioids, give them this drug, and they can immediately stop using opioids,” said Alam.
The study was presented at the American Society for Clinical Psychopharmacology (ASCP) 2018.
A Better Alternative
Currently, the standard of care for the treatment of opioid withdrawl is medication-assisted therapy with buprenorphine (multiple
brands), but many patients wish to stop using opioids completely, Alam said.
“Buprenorphine is essentially another opioid, albeit a designer opioid, but a number of patients object to clinicians saying that
the best evidence is to switch them over to buprenorphine and do buprenorphine for the rest of their life,” he said.
Lofexidine, a selective alpha-2-adrenergic agonist, acts on the central nervous system. Through its effect on the brain stem, it
reduces the symptoms of withdrawal to a point at which they become very tolerable.
“We found in our study that you could basically give patients the lofexidine and stop the opiate. In the majority of cases, the
withdrawal symptoms at that point were mild,” Alam said.
The researchers enrolled 602 men and women aged 18 years or older who sought treatment for dependence on short-acting
opioids. Most were men (71%); the mean age of the patients was 35 years (±11 years).
Most patients (83%) were dependent on heroin.
Participants were randomly assigned to receive placebo, lofexidine 0.6 mg qid (2.4 mg/day), or lofexidine 0.8 mg qid (3.2
mg/day) for 7 days after abrupt opioid discontinuation.
The study assessed the benefit of lofexidine with the Short Opiate Withdrawal Scale–Gossop (SOWS-G), a 10-item inventory of
common opioid withdrawal symptoms in which higher scores indicate worse symptoms; by the percentage of participants who
completed the study; and by use of the Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS), an 11-item inventory of opioid withdrawal
signs and symptoms in which higher scores indicate worse symptoms.

Scores on the SOWS-G were lower for patients treated with lofexidine at both doses compared to patients given placebo (-0.21
for lofexidine 2.4 mg, P = .02; and -0.26 for lofexidine 3.2 mg, P = .003). More patients in the lofexidine-treated group completed
the 7-day trial than in the placebo group (41.5% in the 2.4-mg group (odds ratio [OR], 1.85, P = .007), and 39.6% in the 3.2-mg
group (OR, 1.71; P = .02), vs 27.8% for placebo.
Mean COWS scores were significantly lower on days 1 to 5 for patients in the lofexidine groups than for patients who received
placebo (P < .01).
Good Timing
The most common side effects seen with lofexidine were hypotension, orthostatic hypotension, and bradycardia, but they
resulted in few study discontinuations.
The US debut of lofexidine comes at a crucial time. It was recently granted approval by the US Food and Drug Administration
(FDA), as reported by Medscape Medical News.
This approval came after 17 years of hard work on the part of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).