Tag Archives: Ketamine for depression

Esketamine center | Esketamine Doctor | 703-844-0184 | Arlington, Virginia 22207 22213 | NOVA Health Recovery | Dr. Sendi | Esketamine provider | Nasal spry ketamine therapy | Ketamine for treatment of depression, PTSD, anxiety | Ketamine Infusion Center | Ketamine depression | Ketamine PTSD | email@novahealthrecovery.com | 2220 22182 23103 22039 20197 20184 22101 22102 22066 | CBD doctor CBD Center | 703-844-0184 | Fairfax, Va 22034 | 22308



NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22306 | Call for esketamine and nasal ketamine as well as IV Ketamine for depression, PTSD, anxiety  703-844-0184

Allergan and Lundbeck await depression and mania data

Allergan needs a win with rapastinel, while Lundbeck’s chief exec faces her second clinical challenge.

Calendar pin 14th

Welcome to your weekly digest of approaching regulatory and clinical readouts. After a tough 2018 Allergan needs some good news, and it will soon find out if its depression project rapastinel will provide it. Three phase III trials of the project are due to yield topline data in the first half of this year.

Rapastinel targets the NMDA receptor, making it similar to Johnson & Johnson’s ketamine enantiomer esketamine. The J&J candidate is under US review with a PDUFA date of May 2019, though continuing US government shutdown could put approval in doubt.

Although the two projects are often mentioned in the same breath they act differently: rapastinel is a partial agonist of the NMDA receptor, while esketamine blocks it. This way, Allergan hopes, its project might not have the same psychomimetic effects as ketamine and, to a lesser extent, esketamine.

Dissociation – becoming less aware of one’s surroundings – has been seen with the J&J project. Allergan will want to show a safety edge with rapastinel, but stronger efficacy versus esketamine would not go amiss either. Still, Bernstein analysts only give rapastinel a 50% chance of success.

The three phase III trials of rapastinel test the project on top of standard antidepressants in patients with a partial response to the existing drugs. The primary endpoint of all three is change in Montgomery-Asberg depression rating scale (MADRS) at three weeks.

Esketamine itself had mixed results in its pivotal programme: the Transform-2 trial met its primary endpoint, but Transform-3 and Transform-1 did not. Across the three studies, which tested esketamine on top of an oral antidepressant, the reduction in MADRS score at four weeks was 3.2-4.1 points.

Allergan is also developing an oral NMDA modulator, AGN-241751, but this has only just entered phase II. The company, which faced calls for a break-up last year, needs a nearer-term boost, and with 2024 sales forecasts of $505m rapastinel is its biggest pipeline hope.

Selected upcoming rapastinel phase III readouts
NameSetting Trial ID Primary completion
RAP-MD-01Adjunctive therapy NCT02932943Nov 2018
RAP-MD-02Adjunctive therapy NCT02943564Nov 2018
RAP-MD-03Adjunctive therapy NCT02943577Nov 2018
RAP-MD-06 Long-term safety study, adjunctive therapyNCT03002077Nov 2018
RAP-MD-04 Adjunctive therapy, relapse preventionNCT02951988Sep 2019
RAP-MD-32MonotherapyNCT03560518Feb 2020
RAP-MD-30 MonotherapyNCT03675776Dec 2020
RAP-MD-99 Adjunctive or monotherapyNCT03668600Feb 2021
RAP-MD-33 Monotherapy, relapse preventionNCT03614156Jul 2021
Source: EvaluatePharma, Clinicaltrials.gov.

Second test

The two upcoming phase III readouts for Lundbeck’s antipsychotic Rexulti in bipolar mania might not be game changing: there are already approved drugs for this indication, and existing off-label use of antipsychotics is being fuelled by increasing genericisation.

Still, the data will be interesting as they represent the second clinical stock catalyst for Lundbeck’s new chief executive, Deborah Dunsire. The first was the failure of Lu AF35700 in treatment-resistant schizophrenia, and drove shares down almost 30%.

Some analysts do not think that success in bipolar mania will add materially to Rexulti sales, but the downside risk of a second negative trial readout is substantially greater given the lack of other catalysts.

The two bipolar trials have enrolled 322 and 333 patients, the active cohorts given 2-4mg of Rexulti for 21 days, with a six-month follow-up. The primary endpoint is change in the Young-mania rating scale, and a key secondary endpoint is clinical global impression-bipolar (CGI BP) severity-of-illness score in mania.

Even if there is improvement in severity of illness, success in bipolar mania will at best be a nice-to-have addition to Rexulti’s current uses in schizophrenia and major depressive disorder, according to analysts at Leerink.

A more exciting event for Lundbeck will be whether Rexulti can have an impact on agitation in Alzheimer’s disease, where Bernstein analysts reckon success could add $1bn of sales. However, previous data have been mixed.

For now, if Rexulti does not deliver the goods in the more immediate bipolar indication, the market could seize it as an opportunity to punish the stock further.

Selected upcoming Rexulti phase III readouts
SettingTrial IDData due
Bipolar manic episodesNCT03259555Q1 2019
Bipolar manic episodesNCT03257865Q1 2019
Alzheimer’s agitationNCT035485842020
Alzheimer’s agitationNCT035941232021
Alzheimer’s agitationNCT037249422021
Source: EvaluatePharma, Clinicaltrials.gov.



Esketamine | 703-844-0184 | Ketamine Infusion Center | NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22308 | esketamine Virginia | Esketamine provider | Esketamine doctor | Esketamine Fairfax, va | email@novahealthrecovery.com | Nasal Spray Ketamine | Ketamine Treatment Provider, ketamine for depression, PTSD, anxiety, pain | 22067 | 22066 | 22039 |22101 |22182 | 20124 | 20171 | 22207 | 22102 |Esketamine Northern Virginia | Esketamine Treatment Provider | Esketamine Therapy for depression | 703-844-0184 | Esketamine Maryland | Esketamine Arlington, Va


Depression Therapy With Party-Drug Roots Faces FDA Panel Review

Depression Therapy With Party-Drug Roots Faces FDA Panel Review



Depression Therapy With Party-Drug Roots Faces FDA Panel Review

NOVA Health Recovery : Call 703-844-0184 if you are interested in Ketamine Therapy for depression | Alexandria, Va 22306 | 22101 | We offer Esketamine and intranasal Ketamine therapy for PTSD, depression, anxiety and others.

Potential for abuse and strategies for containing any risks from an experimental depression treatment from Johnson & Johnson will be in focus at an Food and Drug Administration panel next week.

J&J’s nasal spray, esketamine, a close cousin of the party drug ketamine, will be considered by an FDA advisory panel on Feb. 12. While agency staff seemed satisfied that the likelihood of abuse is low, they raised questions about safety issues connected to a dreamlike sensation the medication can create in some users.

“Ketamine abuse is relatively uncommon in the general population,” agency staff said in a report ahead of next week’s meeting. Just 1.3 percent of people over age 12 abuse the drug, lower than abuse rates for other hallucinogens like ecstasy and LSD.

At the same time, reviewers worried that patients could get into accidents or otherwise be harmed if they leave a doctor’s office while still experiencing disassociation, a known side effect of ketamine — and a sought-after experience for casual users who have dubbed the spacey feeling the “K-hole.”

It takes roughly 90 minutes for disassociation symptoms from esketamine to resolve, according to the report. FDA staff also cited elevated blood pressure as a safety concern.

Esketamine is a key part of J&J’s pharmaceutical pipeline, as the company faces flagging sales this year weighed down by drug pricing scrutiny and looming generic competition. Its shares, which rose 2.3 percent this year through Thursday’s close, were were little changed in early trading on Friday.

In addition to weighing in on the drug’s safety and a proposed risk-evaluation and mitigation strategy, FDA staff will ask advisers to vote on whether esketamine effectively treated the depression of patients who weren’t helped by other therapies. They’ll also discuss whether additional studies are needed before or after the drug is potentially approved.

The staff report noted there were six deaths among patients taking the J&J drug, of which three were suicide in the esketamine depression program, but they didn’t see a clear link to the drug itself.

“Given the small number of cases, the severity of the patients’ underlying illness, and the lack of a consistent pattern among these cases, it is difficult to consider these deaths as drug related,” staff reviewers noted.

A decision on whether to allow the drug on the market is expected by March 4. Esketamine has the FDA’s breakthrough-therapy designation in treatment-resistant depression as well as for depressed people at risk of suicide. Results from a study in suicidal patients are expected this year. Allergan is also testing a fast-acting antidepressant, rapastinel, which is about a year behind esketamine in testing.



Northern Virginia Ketamine Center | 703-844-0184 | NOVA Health Recovery | Dr. Sendi | Ketamine versus Special K | Intranasal Ketamine for depression | Ketamine nasal spray | Ketamine Doctors | Fairfax, Va 22304 | 22101 | Loudon County Virginia Ketamine Treatment | 703-844-0184 | CBD Center | THC Oil Center |20147 | 20148 |Addiction Specialists | PTSD Treatment Center | ADHD

NOVA Health Recovery Ketamine Treatment Center | Alexandria, Va 22306 | 703-844-0184 | email@novahealthrecovery.com | Call for a Ketamine Infusion | No referral needed | Intranasal Ketamine | CBD Center  <<< Click for a link

‘Special K’ Drug vs Ketamine Therapy: The Differences in Intentions, Use and Application

‘Special K’ Drug vs Ketamine Therapy: The Differences in Intentions, Use and Application

The Differences Between ‘Special K’ and Ketamine Therapy

Some know it as a veterinary tranquilizer, others know it as a party drug. For others still, it might be a life-line, the only hope to get their life back from the throes of crippling depression. We are talking about a drug called ketamine or ‘Special K’.

Ketamine’s many names and uses make it a difficult drug to understand. The scientific research on ketamine is evolving so rapidly that not even medical professionals can’t agree on how it should be used.

This article takes all of the information about ketamine, or ‘Special K’, and breaks it down so that it’s simple, accurate, and concise. If you’re wondering about the many differences between using ketamine as a street drug and using it therapeutically, then you’ve come to the right place.

Special K: Ketamine as a Street Drug

Most people first learn about ketamine when they hear about the street drug called ‘Special K’. Other names for the drug when used recreationally are: Ketalar, Ketaject, Vitamin K, and Super K. While this drug is not as widely used as Marijuana or some other illicit substances, it has a strong hold on certain niche markets, like the clubbing and raving scenes.

Although doctors and veterinarians began using ketamine in the 1960s, it wasn’t introduced into the party scene until much later. The trend actually began in India, in the Goa trance music scene of the 1980s, and made its way to the western world from there. By the 1990s, ketamine was a major force in the psychedelic drug scene throughout Europe and the United States.

Despite small ups and downs since its introduction in the ‘90s, Special K has remained a steadily popular drug among high school and college students. The US’s National Institute on Drug Abuse has found that 1.2 percent of high school seniors report that they’ve used ketamine in the last year. While that’s much lower than some other drugs, it’s still significant given the seriousness of ketamine’s effects and the dangers of its potential side effects.

An overdose of ketamine can lead to death. Even non-lethal doses can cause side effects like chest pain, memory loss, and trouble breathing. Those who use Special K recreationally often become addicted, and eventually lose their jobs, relationships, and lives to the drug.

Ketamine Therapy: How Doctors Are Using Ketamine to Change Lives

“At this point, any new depression treatment that makes it to the finish line is a huge win.” That’s Dr. George Papakostas speaking to Time Magazine about the desperate need that medical providers have for depression medications. He says that whatever drug does make across that finish line is “going to have a major impact.”

That drug may very well be ketamine.

Despite its reputation as a street drug or a horse tranquilizer, multiple scientific studies have found the drug is a very effective remedy for a number of ailments (such as PTSD), but especially depression.

Ketamine, along with drugs like phencyclidine (popularly known as PCP) and dextromethorphan (often called DXM or ‘Robo’), belongs to a class of drugs called dissociative anesthetics. These kinds of drugs tend to give the users a ‘floating’ sensation, as if they’re detached from their bodies and their surroundings.

Special K is a particularly fast acting form of dissociative anesthetic, which is why it works so well as both a party drug and a numbing agent in surgeries. In medical settings, Ketamine is often used as an initial anesthetic before other, more powerful painkillers like morphine can kick in. But it’s not these anesthetic effects that make the ketamine drug so effective as an antidepressant.

In fact, doctors aren’t entirely sure what it is about ketamine that helps people overcome their depression. Many think that it has something to do with starting up the ‘synaptic plasticity’ of the brain. This is the part of the brain that has the ability to grow and change over time, and increased plasticity is a common effect of other antidepressant medication.

However it works, the scientific results are pretty clear: regular, therapeutic doses of ketamine helps eliminate the symptoms of depression.

One study from February of 2018 observed “significant improvement of depressive symptoms” in a double-blind clinical trial of 67 adults with treatment-resistant depression (a type of depression that doesn’t respond to other medications like Prozac). Further, the study found that the improvements in the patients were sustained throughout the entire 9-week period of the study. That’s not just a good finding, it’s a breakthrough for treating a condition that has long eluded medical professionals.

Although ketamine has not yet been approved in a prescription pill or nasal spray form for treating depression, there are treatment centers that can offer completely legal ketamine therapy for depression. One of these centers, based in Los Angles, is called Ketamine Clinics.

At these centers doctors are able to administer ketamine drugs in a controlled and calm setting through intravenous or infusion methods.

Why People Use Ketamine Drugs: Therapy Vs. Thrill Seeking

Although the ketamine drug used in therapy is technically the same as the Special K drug used in wild raves, the motivations and outcomes of the experiences are very different.

Using Special K to Get High:

When people use Special K as a street drug, they are looking for a high. Some might be seeking a thrilling experience at a rave, while others might be trying to escape from a life that they find overwhelming. Many end up dangerously addicted to the drug after repeated use.

Almost immediately after the drug is ingested, the user begins to feel the effects of the ketamine. At lower doses, ketamine may merely make the user feel ‘dreamy’. But, at higher doses, ketamine can have extreme euphoric and hallucinogenic effects. When these effects are at their most extreme, the user can become immobilized and go into a ‘K-Hole’.

Ketamine’s effects on mobility and memory are so drastic that it is often used as a date rape drug. In this way, the high of Special K can quickly turn into a horrible low.

This dark side of ketamine is made more dangerous by the fact that recreational users are often getting their supply from unregulated sources, like the Chinese black market or the ‘dark web’. Unregulated drugs like this can be cut with toxic chemicals or other drugs, and they can have very inconsistent potencies, making it nearly impossible to determine a safe dose.

In short, ketamine is like many other street drugs when it’s used illicitly: it offers a quick, dangerous high that can easily lead to addiction.

Using Ketamine as Therapy:

John Abenstein, MD, the president of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, has said that “Outside of the clinic, ketamine can cause tragedies, but in the right hands, it is a miracle.”

It’s this miracle, and not a fun ‘high’, that people are seeking when they use ketamine for therapy.

Many people’s lives have been plagued by depression, bipolar disorder, and PTSD. People lose their jobs because they can’t find the will to leave their beds in the morning. Their friendships fall apart and their marriages often end in divorce. Some severely depressed people end up taking their own lives. These tragedies are all too common.

Ketamine therapy offers real hope for millions of people who struggle with these psychological problems daily. It’s especially important for those ‘treatment resistant’ patients who have found no relief from other treatments like SSRIs.

Even though there is not yet a prescription ketamine medication for depression, many people’s lives have already been changed by ketamine therapy in clinics. In fact, there is a whole Ketamine Advocacy Network whose mission is to “spread awareness of ketamine therapy for treatment-resistant depression, bipolar, and PTSD, and to make this treatment available and affordable for all who need it.”

Ketamine therapy is about so much more than a fun party or a weekend escape. It’s about healing lives that have been fractured by crippling disorders.

Intravenous Infusions for Therapy Vs. Snorting or Injecting to Get High

In its recreational drug form, ketamine tends to be a white powder or a crystallized chunk that can be broken apart. In order to get high, people snort the drug as lines of powder, take it orally in pill forms, or inject it intravenously using hypodermic needles.

All of these forms of recreational use present their own dangers, such as infection, the spread of disease through used needles, or incorrect dosing.

Using ketamine in a medical facility is a very different sort of experience.

The ‘route of administration’ (ROA), or how the drug gets into the body, is very important for ketamine’s therapeutic qualities to work. Most therapeutic doses of the ketamine drug are given intravenously.

The intravenous infusions are given over an elongated period, usually about a half an hour in length. This method allows the practitioners to control the dosage and to spread out the rate of delivery so that the drug can enter the bloodstream in a consistent and steady manner, rather than all at once.

Intravenous infusions also allow the drug to enter directly into the bloodstream. Other ROAs, like pills, can lead to a large percentage of the drug being metabolized by the body before reaching the brain. You can read more about why intravenous infusions are most effective on the Ketamine Advocacy Network website.

How It Feels to Take Ketamine Therapeutically

Therapeutic doses of ketamine definitely won’t send you into a K-Hole, but they can make you a bit woozy. In some cases, people have reported feeling dissociated, but these feeling are usually minor and can even be pleasurable. Still, patients must make sure to arrange a ride home with a friend or family member because they won’t be able to drive.

Many people find that they can go right back to work or school after their ketamine therapy appointment. Others prefer to head home and take a short nap. Either way, the anesthetic effects of the ketamine should be gone shortly after the session.

Although it varies from patient to patient, many people only require ketamine therapy once a week or less in order to see a significant or total reduction in their symptoms!

K-Hole: The Risks of a Special K Drug Overdose

As we’ve mentioned above, a ketamine overdose is not pleasant, and can even be deadly. Although you don’t have to worry about this if you’re just taking therapeutic doses, those who use the drug recreationally must be very careful.

When someone takes high amounts of the Special K drug they can end up in a sort of catatonic state where they can’t move or talk. This is called a K-hole. Some describe it as a near death experience, and that’s not a good thing. It can be a terrifying and even traumatizing experience.

But a K-Hole is not the worst thing that can happen if you take too much ketamine. A ketamine overdose can also lead to vomiting, chest pain, seizures, and even death.

The Future of Ketamine

Depression has plagued humans for millennia. It was first described by Hippocrates as “Melancholia”, and although we know much more about the disease these days, the treatments that are widely available are far from perfect. This is why the advances in ketamine therapy are so exciting.

Doctor Thomas Insel has said that ““Recent data suggest that ketamine, given intravenously, might be the most important breakthrough in antidepressant treatment in decades.” That’s a big deal coming from the director of the Institute of Mental Health.

Ketamine may continue to be a dangerous street drug for some, but for others it’s a beacon of shining hope.

Ketamine for OCD | 703-844-0184 | NOVA Health recovery | Intranasal Ketamine | Arlington, Va 22101 | 22066 | Ketamine treatment Center | Depression Treatment | CBD Doctor | THC Doctor | Suboxone Treatment Center | Addiction treatment Center | Loudon County, Va 20147 | 703-844-0184 | Intranasal Ketamine Treatment Center | IV Vitamin Therapy | Nose spray Ketamine

NOVA Health Recovery Ketamine Treatment Center | 703-844-0184 | Call for Ketamine Treatment for depression, OCD | email@novahealthrecovery.com | Fairfax, Arlington, Virginia

K for OCD

The pros and cons of ketamine

By Tracie White
Illustration by Kotryna Zukauskaite

Geuris “Jerry” Rivas, a native of New York, was diagnosed with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder when he was 15. Obsessions with organizing and reorganizing the belongings in his bedroom — posters, comic books, videos — took over most of his life.

Extra

volumehigh audio interview  < interview Link

Forced by germ obsessions to compulsively wash and rewash his hands, he started wearing gloves all day to both protect him from the germs and stop him from washing his hands raw. Now, at 36, OCD symptoms continue to cost him jobs and relationships. He’s managed to turn his organizational skills into a profession — he’s a home organizer and house cleaner — but still he struggles daily with his obsessions.

“It’s caused me a great deal of suffering,” Rivas says. “I’ve tried many, many medications. I’ve wasted so much of my life.”

In 2012, running out of answers, Rivas took part in the first clinical trial to test ketamine as a treatment for OCD. While ketamine is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as an anesthetic, it is also an illicit party drug known as “Special K,” with hallucinogenic effects and the potential for abuse. Over the past 10 years, dozens of small studies of ketamine’s ability to treat a variety of mood and anxiety disorders have reported remarkable results — including the sudden alleviation of treatment-resistant depression, bipolar disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. And these effects lasted days, sometimes weeks, after the hallucinogenic effects of the drug wore off.

With a single infusion of the drug, Rivas experienced for two weeks what it was like to live without the compulsions and obsessions that had for years controlled his life.

“I felt like, for the first time, I was able to function like a regular person,” he says.

Illustration of a giant K being painted by a man in a white coat
Kotryna Zukauskaite

Pros and cons

Ketamine has brought hope to a psychiatric field desperate to find new treatments for severe OCD, a chronic condition marked by debilitating obsessions and repetitive behaviors. Current treatments, which include antidepressants such as Prozac, can take months to have any effect on the disease, if they work at all.

“Severe OCD takes such a toll on patients,” says Carolyn Rodriguez, MD, PhD, who as a researcher at Columbia University ran the OCD trial. Now an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford, she has continued to explore the pros and cons of using ketamine to treat OCD. “The constant, intrusive thoughts that something is contaminated, the checking and rechecking, the repetitive behaviors. It interferes with your life, your jobs, your relationships.”

Ketamine was developed in the 1960s and has been used for decades as an anesthetic during surgery. It remains a mystery just how the drug works in the brain, and there are safety concerns. There is evidence from people who take the drug routinely — in much higher doses — that chronic, high-frequency ketamine use may be associated with increased risk of bladder inflammation and cognitive impairment, Rodriguez says. And if taken regularly, it can lead to dependence.

But researchers like Rodriguez are intrigued about the drug’s potential to help them identify a whole new line of medicines for fast-acting treatment of mental health disorders.

“What most excites me about ketamine is that it works in a different way than traditional antidepressants,” Rodriguez says. “Using ketamine, we hope to understand the neurobiology that could lead to safe, fast-acting treatments. I feel that is part of my mission as a physician and researcher.”

‘Right out of a movie’

Rodriguez’s interest in ketamine as a treatment for OCD was sparked about a decade ago when she was starting out as a research scientist at Columbia. A small, placebo-controlled study published in 2006 by a mentor of hers, Carlos Zarate, MD, now chief of the section on neurobiology and treatment of mood disorders at the National Institute of Mental Health, had shown that ketamine induced dramatic improvement in treatment-resistant depression within two hours of infusion. It was a landmark study, drawing attention among the psychiatric community and launching a new field of research into the use of ketamine to treat various mood and anxiety disorders.”What most excites me about ketamine is that it works in a different way than traditional antidepressants.”

Rodriguez, intent on searching for better, faster treatments for her patients like Rivas with OCD, took note. There was an emerging theory that ketamine affects the levels of the neurotransmitter glutamate in the brain and increasing evidence that glutamate plays a role in OCD symptoms, she says. Perhaps ketamine could help regulate OCD symptoms as well as depression.

In 2013, Rodriguez and colleagues published their results from that first clinical trial of ketamine in OCD patients. The trial randomized 15 patients with OCD to ketamine or placebo.

In those patients who were given ketamine, the effect was immediate. Patients reported dramatic decreases in their obsessive-compulsive symptoms midway through the 40-minute infusion, according to the study. The diminished symptoms lasted throughout the following week in half of the patients. Most striking were comments by the patients quoted in the study: “I tried to have OCD thoughts, but I couldn’t,” said one. Another said, “I feel as if the weight of OCD has been lifted.” A third said, “I don’t have any intrusive thoughts. … This is amazing, unbelievable. This is right out of a movie.” And while nearly all initially had dissociative effects like feelings of unreality, distortions of time or hallucinations, they were gone within two hours after the start of the infusion.

“Carolyn’s study was quite exciting,” Zarate says, adding that there were a number of similar, small but rigorous studies following his 2006 study that found fast-acting results using ketamine to treat bipolar disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder.

“We had no reason to believe that ketamine could wipe out any symptoms of these disorders within hours or days,” he says.

So how does it work?

Virtually all of the antidepressants used in the past 60 years work the same way: by raising levels of serotonin or one or two other neurotransmitters. Ketamine, however, doesn’t affect serotonin levels. Exactly what it does remains unclear.”There’s a recognition that people like me and others are using the drug to treat patients now. There’s an incredible need for something.”

Since coming to Stanford in 2015, Rodriguez has been funded by the National Institute of Mental Health for a large clinical trial of ketamine’s effects on OCD. This five-year trial aims to follow 90 OCD patients for as long as six months after they’ve been given a dose of ketamine or an alternative drug. Rodriguez and her research team want to observe how ketamine changes participants’ brains, as well as test for side effects.

Ultimately, Rodriguez says, she hopes the study will lead to the discovery of other fast-acting drugs that work in the brain like ketamine but without its addictive potential.

Recent research in the field indicates that the glutamate hypothesis that triggered her pilot study might be further refined.

“Ketamine is a complicated drug that works on many different receptor sites,” she says. “Researchers have fixated on the NMDA receptor, one of the glutamate-type receptors, but it might not be the only receptor bringing benefit.”

In May 2016, researchers from NIMH and the University of Maryland — Zarate among them — published a study conducted in mice showing that a chemical byproduct, or metabolite, created as the body breaks down ketamine might hold the secret to its rapid antidepressant actions. This metabolite, hydroxynorketamine, reversed depressionlike symptoms in mice without triggering any of the anesthetic, dissociative or addictive side effects associated with ketamine, Zarate says.

“Ideally, we’d like to test hydroxynorketamine and possibly other drugs that act on glutamate pathways without ketamine-like side effects as possible alternatives to ketamine in OCD,” Rodriguez says.

Beyond the clubs

Meanwhile, dozens of commercial ketamine clinics have popped up across the country, making treatments available to patients who are searching for help to stop their suffering now. Medical insurance companies usually cover ketamine’s FDA-approved use as an anesthetic but won’t cover its use for other purposes, such as mental health disorders. So patients who have run out of treatment options are paying hundreds of dollars a dose for repeated ketamine infusions.

“The fact that these clinics exist is due to the desperation of patients,” says Rodriguez.

She and other researchers are calling for guidelines to protect patients and more research to learn how to use the drug safely.

“I think it’s a game changer, and it’s here to stay,” says David Feifel, MD, PhD, professor emeritus of psychiatry at UC-San Diego, who studies the effect of ketamine on clinical depression. Feifel began prescribing the drug for patients with treatment-resistant depression in 2010.

“I’ve found it to be very safe,” Feifel says, adding that the American Psychiatric Association this year issued safety guidelines on how to use ketamine clinically for treatment of depression.

“There’s a recognition that people like me and others are using the drug to treat patients now,” he says. “There’s an incredible need for something.”

The drug hasn’t worked for everyone he’s treated, Feifel says, but for many it’s been “life-changing.”

Rodriguez says she understands what motivates the clinicians to prescribe the drug now to patients in dire straits — those who are suicidal or who have tried every possible medication and therapeutic option and continue to suffer each day.

“I see it as a way to treat people whose OCD is very, very severe,” she says. “People who can’t come out of the house, who are suicidal, who have no other options.

“I just don’t like the idea of people being in pain,” Rodriguez adds. “I want to see science translated into treatments now.”

Meanwhile, researchers are learning more about the drug. Janssen Pharmaceutical is testing the efficacy of a version of ketamine, known as esketamine, as a therapy for treatment-resistant depression and for major depressive disorder with imminent risk for suicide. The FDA has fast-tracked both investigations. At Stanford, Alan Schatzberg, MD, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, along with other faculty including Rodriguez, is studying the mechanism of action for ketamine in treating depression.

Rodriguez is also interested in using ketamine to kick-start a type of cognitive behavioral therapy called exposure and response prevention, an evidence-based psychological treatment designed to help patients overcome OCD. The therapy involves teaching patients with OCD to face anxieties by refraining from ritualizing behaviors, then progressing to more challenging anxieties as they experience success.

Relaxation and other techniques also help patients tolerate their anxiety — for example, postponing the compulsion to wash their hands for at least 30 minutes, then extending that time period.

“My goal isn’t to have people taking ketamine for long periods of time,” Rodriguez says. But perhaps a short-term course of ketamine could provide its own kind of exposure and response prevention by allowing patients to experience that it is possible not to be controlled by their OCD, she says.

Rivas well remembers that infusion of ketamine he received during Rodriguez’s first clinical trial to test the drug. The rush made him feel “like Superman.”

“I felt like my body was bigger, that I was more muscular, that I could tackle anything,” he says. But that feeling only lasted the duration of the 40-minute infusion. His OCD symptoms disappeared immediately and were still gone for two weeks after.

“I was amazed that something like that would work and work so fast,” he says. His OCD symptoms today are still intrusive, but he manages to keep them under control by taking antidepressants and seeing a therapist. Still, each day when he comes home from work, he has to put gloves on before he enters his apartment building, and as soon as he enters his apartment, he must wash his hands.

“It’s a ritual now,” he says. “There has never been a time that I haven’t done that, except those two weeks after the ketamine.”

When he heard that certain private ketamine clinics are now offering the drug as treatment for OCD, he said he understands why patients take the risks and pay the high prices. As more research has become available, he’s begun considering it himself.

“I’ve been suffering through my OCD for so long, I’ve gotten to the point where I’d try anything,” he says.

Intranasal Ketamine | 703-844-0184 | Ketamine Treatment Provider | Alexandria, Va 22306| Ketamine for deprssion | Ketamine doctor | Loudon, Va 22043 22046 22101 22102 22107 22108 22109 | IV Ketamine for depression | Ketamine for PTSD , OCD | Bipolar | Ketamine Infusion Center | 703-844-0184 | Loudon, Va | Ketamine IV Treatment Center | Ketamine Doctor | Intranasal Ketamine |Alexandria, Va 22306 | Ketamine for Depression | Intranasal Ketamine | OCD| CBD Center | Medical CBD | Medical THC Center | THC Doctor | Ketamine for Alcoholism | Intranasal Ketamine | 22043 22046 22101 22102 22106 22107 22108 22109 20175 20176 20147 20148 20151 22030 22031 22032 22034 22038 | IV Vitamin Therapy

 

703-844-0184 | NOVA health Recovery Ketamine Treatment Center | Alexandria, Va 22306 | email@novahealthrecovery.com

 

Image result for intranasal ketamine |Ketamine Infusion Center | 703-844-0184 | Loudon, Va | Ketamine IV Treatment Center | Ketamine Doctor | Intranasal Ketamine |Alexandria, Va 22306 | Ketamine for Depression | Intranasal Ketamine | OCD| CBD Center | Medical CBD | Medical THC Center | THC Doctor | Ketamine for Alcoholism | Intranasal Ketamine | 22043 22046 22101 22102 22106 22107 22108 22109 20175 20176 20147 20148 20151 22030 22031 22032 22034 22038 | IV Vitamin Therapy
Ketamine Infusion Center | 703-844-0184 | Loudon, Va | Ketamine IV Treatment Center | Ketamine Doctor | Intranasal Ketamine |Alexandria, Va 22306 | Ketamine for Depression | Intranasal Ketamine | OCD| CBD Center | Medical CBD | Medical THC Center | THC Doctor | Ketamine for Alcoholism | Intranasal Ketamine | 22043 22046 22101 22102 22106 22107 22108 22109 20175 20176 20147 20148 20151 22030 22031 22032 22034 22038 | IV Vitamin Therapy

One more reason to treat your depression rapidly with Ketamine:

 

Depression Linked to Increased Risk of Developing Atrial Fibrillation

NEW YORK—Depression appears to be a risk factor for atrial fibrillation, the most common arrhythmia in the U.S., according to new observational data from the national Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) study.

Considering that 20% of U.S. adults report depressive symptoms, “our findings identify a large portion of the U.S. population that is potentially at an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation and who may benefit from more targeted efforts to prevent atrial fibrillation,” Dr. Parveen Garg, from the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, told Reuters Health by email.

He presented the study March 22 at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions in New Orleans.

The analysis included 6,644 adults (mean age, 62; 53% women, 38% white, 28% black, 22% Hispanic, 12% Chinese-American) with no known heart disease at baseline who were followed for a median of 13 years as part of the MESA study.

In the fully adjusted model, individuals with a Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) score of 16 or higher (indicating clinically relevant depressive symptoms) had a 34% (P=0.039) higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation during follow-up compared with those with a CES-D score of less than 2. Similarly, individuals reporting antidepressant use had a significant 36% increase in their risk of developing atrial fibrillation compared with those not on the drugs.

“An important next step is to confirm these results in other studies, especially those with more comprehensive and clinically validated assessments of depression. If confirmed, then it will be important to determine if treating individuals with depression actually reduces their risk of atrial fibrillation,” Dr. Garg said.

Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain a possible link between depression and atrial fibrillation, Dr. Garg explained. Depression can increase systemic inflammation and activate the autonomic nervous system, which increases catecholamine levels, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which increases cortisol levels. Depression may also activate the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.

“Taken together, these changes may induce atrial fibrillation susceptibility either directly by disrupting the electrophysiologic properties of the atria or indirectly by promoting atrial fibrosis, increasing the atrial pressure,” Dr. Garg said, adding that further research is needed to fully understand the mechanisms involved.

Dr. Gordon Tomaselli, a spokesman for the American Heart Association, said this study “affirms the association between depression and atrial fibrillation in a population that I think is important because it’s a mixed population and not just the standard Caucasian population.”

“There are some associated risk factors in people with depression that might increase their risk of atrial fibrillation, including an increased incidence of hypertension in some patients who have depression as well as other disorders that might be driven by activation of the sympathetic nervous system like anxiety disorder. So there are several reasons why people might have depression and atrial fibrillation,” Dr. Tomaselli, who was not involved in the research, told Reuters Health by phone.

“One question is what should we do about it, and I’m not sure we have an answer from this study except to make sure that we are looking for symptoms of depression,” he said. “We don’t know whether treatment of depression will reduce the incidence of atrial fibrillation. There is some reason to think that it might, but there are other reasons to think that antidepressant drugs actually have some effects on the heart, the ion channels that determine the rhythm of the heart.”

The study had no commercial funding and the authors have no relevant disclosures.

SOURCE: https://bit.ly/2pCdkOA

AHA Epidemiology and Prevention – Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018.

Ketamine Infusion Center | 703-844-0184 | Loudon, Va | Ketamine IV Treatment Center | Ketamine Doctor | Intranasal Ketamine |Alexandria, Va 22306 | Ketamine for Depression | Intranasal Ketamine | OCD| CBD Center | Medical CBD | Medical THC Center | THC Doctor | Ketamine for Alcoholism | Intranasal Ketamine | 22043 22046 22101 22102 22106 22107 22108 22109 20175 20176 20147 20148 20151 22030 22031 22032 22034 22038 | IV Vitamin Therapy

 

703-844-0184 | Ketamine Treatment Center | Alexandria, Va 22306 | Call for Ketamine Doctor | Ketamine for depression, OCD, Chronic Pain

 

Ketamine Nasal Sprays for Depression

What is ketamine?

Ketamine Nasal Spray
703-844-0184 | NOVA Health recovery | Fairfax, Va 22304

Ketamine is a drug currently approved by the FDA for use as a general anesthetic during minor surgical procedures such as biopsies. It is widely known as a recreational drug because of its ability to induce cognitive-dissociative, hallucinogenic, and euphoric states in humans. Recently, it has been implicated in research as a potential therapeutic agent in depression especially in patients who have failed previous standard therapies.

Why ketamine?

Standard pharmacologic therapies for depression take several weeks of treatment before patients experience relief. Ketamine is different in that it has been shown to reduce depression symptoms and suicidal ideation in as little as forty minutes. This is considered a potentially lifesaving breakthrough in the treatment of depression because ketamine can rapidly reduce symptoms especially in emergency situations.

How does it work?

The most common medications used in depression affect serotonin in the brain. Ketamine works by a different mechanism. It has been shown to block the glutamate receptors in the brain resulting in its famous hallucinogenic effects. Ketamine has been shown to act on several other receptors, but it is theorized that at low doses, blocking glutamate receptors in the brain may be the reason for its anti-depressive effects.

Who should (and shouldn’t) take ketamine?

Ketamine has not been approved by the FDA for treatment of depression. Although, because of new studies, psychiatrists have been prescribing ketamine “off-label” for patients who did not respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such has Celexa (citalopram), Zoloft (sertraline), or Prozac (fluoxetine) for immediate treatment of symptoms.

Ketamine has been shown to transiently yet significantly increase blood pressure following administration. Patients with high blood pressure should use caution when using ketamine. Ketamine has also been shown to be associated with increases in psychosis or dissociative properties.

Ketamine nasal sprays offer a quick and convenient way to administer ketamine for patients who need immediate relief, although they are currently not available commercially, so you will not find them at your local community pharmacy. Compounding pharmacies have the proper experience, equipment, and personnel to safely compound and customize this medication for you.

References

  1. Ketalar [package insert]. Chestnut Ridge, NY 10977: Par pharmaceutical; 2017 https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2017/016812s043lbl.pdf
  2. Browne CA, Lucki I. Antidepresssant effects of ketamine: mechanisms underlying fast-acting novel antidepressants. Front Pharmacol December 2013.
  3. Lapidus K, Levitch CF, Perez AM, et al. A randomized controlled trial of intranasal ketamine in major depressive disorder. Biol Psychology 2014;76:970–976
  4. Sanacora G, Frye MA, McDonald W, et al. A consensus statement on the use of ketamine in the treatment of mood disorders. JAMA Psychiatry 2017;74(4):399-405.

703-844-0184 | Ketamine Treatment Center | Ketamine Infusions | Loudon, Va | Fairfax, Va | Mcclean, Va | Arlington, Va | 22304 | From street drug to depression therapy | CBD Doctor | CBD center | THC Center | CBD | IV Vitamin Center | Addiction Treatment Center

 

AddictionDomain

703-844-0184 | Fairfax Ketamine Treatment Center for Depression | 

 

From street drug to depression therapy

Ketamine offers a new option for people with stubborn depression that doesn’t respond to other medications.

703-844-0184 | Ketamine Treatment Center in Alexandria, Va 22306

 

Many people know of ketamine as a hallucinogenic and addictive street drug, which, when abused, can put people in medical peril. But today, doctors are increasingly looking to ketamine as a potentially lifesaving treatment for people with severe, treatment-resistant depression, who may be at high risk for suicide.

“Ketamine has been shown to be effective in people who have not responded to antidepressant treatment,” says Dr. Cristina Cusin, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. The fast-acting treatment has shown promise — sometimes improving depressive symptoms within hours of the first intravenous treatment.

While ketamine can offer hope to some, it’s not for everyone. The use of ketamine to treat depression is still controversial in some circles. “Some prescribers would never consider the use of a controlled substance for this purpose, because of the potential for abuse,” says Dr. Cusin. “But as with opiates, a drug is not good or bad, per se.” Still, ketamine does need to be carefully matched to the right patient for the right use to avoid harm, and treatment should be closely monitored over time.

A variety of uses

The use of ketamine in medicine isn’t new. It’s routinely used in hospitals both for anesthesia and for pain relief.

Currently, the use of ketamine for depression is “off label.” This means that although ketamine is approved by the FDA for some medical purposes, it’s not approved specifically to treat depression. However, that may soon change. Under its “fast track” drug approval process, the FDA is reviewing the results of clinical trials of esketamine, a ketamine-based nasal spray, to treat depression, says Dr. Cusin.

For now, people who undergo ketamine treatment for depression typically receive the drug at specialized clinics, either intravenously or as a nasal spray. Effects from the nasal spray last for a single day or a few days, while the intravenous treatment may last for a few weeks to a month. In both instances the dose is significantly lower than would be used for anesthesia or when used illicitly.

How ketamine works

Studies have shown that ketamine is effective in treating people whose depression has not responded to other interventions, says Dr. Cusin. Such treatment-resistant depression is estimated to affect from 10% to 30% of people diagnosed with the condition.

Experts believe that ketamine works through a unique mechanism, directly modulating the activity of a brain chemical called glutamate. Glutamate is believed to play a role in stimulating the growth of new brain connections that may help alleviate depressive symptoms.

People who have taken ketamine to treat their depression experience varying success, depending on their personal history—how long they’ve been depressed, how severe their symptoms are, and how many drugs they’ve tried without seeing improvement, says Dr. Cusin.

For people with less severe depression, ketamine may be effective in as many as 60% of those who try it. Among those with more persistent and significant disease, a smaller number, 30% to 40%, may experience relief, says Dr. Cusin. “The expectation should not be that it will magically cure depression in everybody,” she says. “Ketamine is not a perfect fix. It’s like any other medication.” In other words, it works for some people, and it won’t work for others.

To be effective, treatment with ketamine must typically continue indefinitely and involve careful monitoring. Clinicians who prescribe ketamine for depression should screen patients carefully to ensure the drug is appropriate for the individual, says Dr. Cusin. “Not everybody who wishes to try ketamine will be a good candidate,” she says.

Among those who should not use ketamine are people with

  • a history of substance abuse
  • a history of psychosis
  • elevated blood pressure
  • an uncontrolled medical condition.

Who can benefit?

Because ketamine is a newer treatment, there are still a lot of questions surrounding its use, says Dr. Cusin. For instance:

  • Which people respond best to treatment?
  • How much should be given, and how often?
  • What are the long-term effects of treatment?

Because the medication is being used off label for depression, there are no clearly defined safety recommendations either for home use or for its use in specialized clinics, she says. This means that it’s up to individual providers to guide the patient in making informed decisions about treatment. Choosing a qualified provider is essential. JAMA Psychiatrypublished a statement in 2017 outlining best practices for doctors to follow in ketamine treatment, such as performing a comprehensive assessment, obtaining informed consent, and documenting the severity of depression before starting the medication. These guidelines are aimed at increasing the safe use of ketamine for depression, and providers can use them to help ensure that the treatment is a good match for your condition.

As with any other medical intervention, anyone considering ketamine should also consider the drawbacks of treatment along with the potential benefits. Ketamine’s drawbacks include these:

Cost. It’s expensive and not covered by insurance. “The cost ranges from $400 to $1,200 per dose for the intravenous drug, and you may need as many as 12 to 18 doses a year,” says Dr. Cusin.

Unknowns. Ketamine hasn’t been used to treat depression for long enough for doctors to know whether there are any harmful long-term consequences of taking the medication. More time and study are needed to truly understand how it affects people over the long term.

Treatment failure. Many people with treatment-resistant depression view ketamine treatment as their last option, so if this therapy fails to improve their depression, they can be emotionally devastated. Realistic expectations and follow-up support are essential.

Even if ketamine does produce results, it’s still important to understand what it can and can’t do. “-Ketamine isn’t going to eliminate all frustrations and stress from your life. While it may lift some symptoms of depression, the life stressors will still be there,” says Dr. Cusin. You’ll still need support to help you manage them.

Side effects. While ketamine is viewed as safe in a controlled setting, it can frequently increase blood pressure or produce psychotic-like behavior, which may result in delusions or hallucinations. Serious adverse events are rare because the drug is used at such low doses, says Dr. Cusin.

However, provided you are an appropriate candidate for the treatment and your doctor monitors you closely, you could find that it improves your mood. “Ketamine could make a huge difference in the quality and duration of life and can be very effective for people who are thinking about suicide,” says Dr. Cusin.

Link

703-844-0184 | Ketamine Infusion | Ketamine Treatment Center | Ketamine | Loudon County, Va Fairfax, Va 22304| Ketamine for Seasonal Affective Disorder | SAD| Intranasal Ketamine | CBD Physician | CBD Center | THC Doctor | CBD Center | 22306 | 22308 | 22304

Seasonal Affective Disorder and Ketamine Treatment | 703-844-0184 | Annadale, Va | Arlington, Va | Loudon County, Va | Ketamine IV Treatment for Depression and Seasonal Affective Disorder

Link 2

Seasonal Affective Disorder and Ketamine Treatment

NOVA Health Recovery  <<< Ketamine Treatment Center Fairfax, Virginia

CAll 703-844-0184 for an immediate appointment to evaluate you for a Ketamine infusion:

Ketaminealexandria.com    703-844-0184 Call for an infusion to treat your depression. PTSD, Anxiety, CRPS, or other pain disorder today.

email@novahealthrecovery.com  << Email for questions to the doctor

Ketamine center in Fairfax, Virginia    << Ketamine infusions

Ketamine – NOVA Ketamine facebook page – ketamine treatment for depression

facebook Ketamine page

NOVA Health Recovery  << Ketamine clinic Fairfax, Va  – Call 703-844-0184 for an appointment – Fairfax, Virginia

Ketamine Consultants Blog

703-844-0184 | Loudon, Co Va | Ketamine Infusion | Ketamine for Depression

Seasonal Affective Disorder and Ketamine Infusions as a rapid treatment

 

Do you find yourself getting depressed and sad in the fall and wintertime despite your best efforts? Seasonal affective disorder is common and can disrupt your lifestyle and happiness. Consider Ketamine infusions as an option for immediate relief with follow through intranasal ketamine. We can provide these solutions for people suffering from this disorder. A series of 2- 6 infusions can manage the majority of patients with rapid recover, almost within a few days. 

Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD, is a type of recurrent major depressive disorder in which episodes of depression occur during the same season each year. This condition is sometimes called the “winter blues.”

Definition

Seasonal affective disorder (also called SAD) is form of depression in which people experience depressive episodes during specific times of the year. The most common seasonal pattern is for depressive episodes to being in the fall or winter and diminish in the spring. A less common type of SAD, known as summer depression, usually begins in the late spring or early summer. SAD may be related to changes in the amount of daylight a person receives.

SAD is not considered as a separate disorder, but rather is a type of depression that has a recurring seasonal pattern. To be diagnosed with SAD, an individual must meet criteria for major depression coinciding with specific seasons for at least two years. The individual must experience seasonal depressions much more frequently than any non-seasonal depressions.

Seasonal affective disorder is estimated to affect 10 million Americans. Another 10 percent to 20 percent may have mild SAD. SAD is four times more common in women than in men. The age of onset is estimated to be between the age of 18 and 30. Some people experience symptoms severe enough to affect quality of life, and 6 percent require hospitalization. Many people with SAD report at least one close relative with a psychiatric disorder, most frequently a severe depressive disorder (55 percent) or alcohol abuse (34 percent).

Symptoms

Not everyone with SAD has the same symptoms, but symptoms commonly associated with the “winter blues” include the following:

  • Feelings of hopelessness and sadness
  • Thoughts of suicide
  • Hypersomnia or a tendency to oversleep
  • A change in appetite, especially a craving for sweet or starchy foods
  • Weight gain
  • A heavy feeling in the arms or legs
  • A drop in energy level
  • Decreased physical activity
  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Irritability
  • Increased sensitivity to social rejection
  • Avoidance of social situations

Symptoms of summer SAD are:

  • Poor appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Insomnia
  • Agitation and anxiety

Either type of SAD may also include some of the symptoms that are present in major depression, such as feelings of guilt, a loss of interest or pleasure in activities previously enjoyed, ongoing feelings of hopelessness or helplessness, or physical problems such as headaches and stomach aches.

Symptoms of SAD tend to reoccur at about the same time every year. To be diagnosed with SAD, the changes in mood should not be a direct result of obvious seasonal stressors (like being regularly unemployed during the winter). Usually, this form of depression is mild or moderate. However, some people experience severe symptoms that leave them unable to function in their daily lives.

Seasonal affective disorder can be misdiagnosed as hypothyroidyism, hypoglycemia, or a viral infection such as mononucleosis.

Causes

The cause for SAD is unknown. One theory is that it is related to the amount of melatonin in the body, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland. Darkness increases the body’s production of melatonin, which regulates sleep. As the winter days get shorter and darker, melatonin production in the body increases and people tend to feel sleepier and more lethargic.

Another theory is that people with SAD may have trouble regulating their levels of serotonin, which is a major neurotransmitter involved in mood. Finally, research has suggested that people with SAD also may produce less Vitamin D, which is believed to play a role in serotonin activity. Vitamin D insufficiency may be associated with clinically significant depression symptoms.

There are several known risk factors that increase an individuals chance of developing SAD. For example, SAD is more frequent in people who live far north or south of the equator. Additionally, people with a family history of other types of depression are more likely to develop SAD than people who do not have this family history.

Treatments

Treatment approaches to alleviate the symptoms of SAD typically include combinations of antidepressant medication, light therapy, Vitamin D, and counseling.

Because winter depression may be caused by a reaction to a lack of sunlight, broad-band light therapy is frequently used as a treatment option. This therapy requires a light box or a light visor worn on the head like a cap. The individual either sits in front of the light box or wears light visor for a certain length of time each day. Generally, light therapy takes between 30 and 60 minutes each day throughout the fall and winter. The amount of time required varies with each individual. When light therapy is sufficient to reduce symptoms and to increase energy level, the individual continues to use it until enough daylight is available, typically in the springtime. Stopping light therapy too soon can result in a return of symptoms.

When used properly, light therapy seems to have few side effects. The side effects that do arise include eyestrain, headache, fatigue, irritability, and inability to sleep (when light therapy is used too late in the day). People with manic depressive disorders, skin that is sensitive to light, or medical conditions that make their eyes vulnerable to light damage may not be good candidates for light therapy.

When light therapy does not improve symptoms within a few days, then medication and behavioral therapies such as CBT should be introduced. In some cases, light therapy can be used in combination with one or all of these therapies.

Self-Care

  • Monitor your mood and energy level
  • Take advantage of available sunlight
  • Plan pleasurable activities for the winter season
  • Plan physical activities
  • Approach the winter season with a positive attitude
  • When symptoms develop seek help sooner rather than later
  • Light therapy and lamps for SAD
  • IV Vitamin Therapy for rapid recovery including Vitamin D injections

Loudon VA Ketamine Center | 703-844-0184 | Fairfax, Va 22306 | | IV Ketamine Treatment Center | Ketamine for Depression and Pain | Woodbridge, Va Ketamine | 703-844-0184 Call for an appointment | Ketamine Articles in the News | Ketamine Blog | Loudon Ketamine | 20147 | 20148

NOVA Health Recovery  <<< Ketamine Treatment Center Fairfax, Virginia

CAll 703-844-0184 for an immediate appointment to evaluate you for a Ketamine infusion:

Ketaminealexandria.com    703-844-0184 Call for an infusion to treat your depression. PTSD, Anxiety, CRPS, or other pain disorder today.

email@novahealthrecovery.com  << Email for questions to the doctor

Ketamine center in Fairfax, Virginia    << Ketamine infusions

Ketamine – NOVA Ketamine facebook page – ketamine treatment for depression

facebook Ketamine page

NOVA Health Recovery  << Ketamine clinic Fairfax, Va  – Call 703-844-0184 for an appointment – Fairfax, Virginia

Ketamine Consultants Blog


Trippy depression treatment? Hopes and hype for ketamine

703-844-0184 | Ketamine Treatment Center | Fairfax , VA 22306 | Loudon, Va

1 of 5

Lauren Pestikas sits as she receives an infusion of the drug ketamine during a 45-minute session at an outpatient clinic in Chicago on July 25, 2018. Pestikas struggled with depression and anxiety and made several suicide attempts before starting ketamine treatments earlier in the year. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)

CHICAGO (AP) — It was launched decades ago as an anesthetic for animals and people, became a potent battlefield pain reliever in Vietnam and morphed into the trippy club drug Special K.

Now the chameleon drug ketamine is finding new life as an unapproved treatment for depression and suicidal behavior. Clinics have opened around the United States promising instant relief with their “unique” doses of ketamine in IVs, sprays or pills. And desperate patients are shelling out thousands of dollars for treatment often not covered by health insurance, with scant evidence on long-term benefits and risks.

Chicago preschool teacher Lauren Pestikas long struggled with depression and anxiety and made several suicide attempts before trying ketamine earlier this year.

The price tag so far is about $3,000, but “it’s worth every dime and penny,” said the 36-year-old.

Pestikas said she feels much better for a few weeks after each treatment, but the effects wear off and she scrambles to find a way to pay for another one.

For now, ketamine has not received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating depression, though doctors can use it for that purpose.

Some studies show ketamine can provide relief within hours for tough-to-treat depression and suicidal behavior and clinics promising unproven benefits have popped up nationwide. But more research is needed to know long-term benefits and risks. (Oct. 31)

Ketamine has been around since the 1960s and is widely used as an anesthesia drug during surgery because it doesn’t suppress breathing. Compared to opioids such as morphine, ketamine isn’t as addictive and doesn’t cause breathing problems. And some studies have shown that ketamine can ease symptoms within hours for the toughest cases.

Its potential effects on depression were discovered in animal experiments in the late 1980s and early 1990s showing that glutamate, a brain chemical messenger, might play a role in depression, and that drugs including ketamine that target the glutamate pathway might work as antidepressants.

Conventional antidepressants like Prozac target serotonin, a different chemical messenger, and typically take weeks to months to kick in — a lag that can cause severely depressed patients to sink deeper into despair.

703-844-0184 | Ketamine Treatment Center | Fairfax , VA 22306 | Loudon, Va

A vial of ketamine, which is normally stored in a locked cabinet, on display in Chicago on July 25, 2018. AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)

Ketamine’s potential for almost immediate if temporary relief is what makes it so exciting, said Dr. Jennifer Vande Voort, a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist who has used ketamine to treat depression patients since February.

“We don’t have a lot of things that provide that kind of effect. What I worry about is that it gets so hyped up,” she said.

The strongest studies suggest it’s most useful and generally safe in providing short-term help for patients who have not benefited from antidepressants. That amounts to about one-third of the roughly 300 million people with depression worldwide.

“It truly has revolutionized the field,” changing scientists’ views on how depression affects the brain and showing that rapid relief is possible, said Yale University psychiatrist Dr. Gerard Sanacora, who has done research for or consulted with companies seeking to develop ketamine-based drugs.

But to become standard depression treatment, he said, much more needs to be known.

Last year, Sanacora co-authored an American Psychiatric Association task force review of ketamine treatment for mood disorders that noted the benefits but said “major gaps” remain in knowledge about long-term effectiveness and safety. Most studies have been small, done in research settings and not in the real world.

When delivered through an IV, ketamine can cause a rapid increase in heart rate and blood pressure that could be dangerous for some patients. Ketamine also can cause hallucinations that some patients find scary.

“There are some very real concerns,” Sanacora said. “We do know this drug can be abused, so we have to be very careful about how this is developed.”

Dr. Rahul Khare, an emergency medicine specialist in Chicago, first learned about ketamine’s other potential benefits a decade ago from a depressed and anxious patient he was preparing to sedate to fix a repeat dislocated shoulder.

“He said, ‘Doc, give me what I got last time. For about three weeks after I got it I felt so much better,’” Khare recalled.

Khare became intrigued and earlier this year began offering ketamine for severe depression at an outpatient clinic he opened a few years ago. He also joined the American Society for Ketamine Physicians, formed a year ago representing about 140 U.S. doctors, nurses, psychologists and others using ketamine for depression or other nonapproved uses.

703-844-0184 | Ketamine Treatment Center | Fairfax , VA 22306 | Loudon, Va

Dr. Rahul Khare poses for a portrait at his outpatient Chicago clinic on July 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)

There are about 150 U.S. ketamine clinics, compared with about 20 three years ago, said society co-founder Dr. Megan Oxley.

Khare said the burgeoning field “is like a new frontier” where doctors gather at meetings and compare notes. He has treated about 50 patients with depression including Pestikas. They’re typically desperate for relief after failing to respond to other antidepressants. Some have lost jobs and relationships because of severe depression, and most find that ketamine allows them to function, Khare said.

Typical treatment at his clinic involves six 45-minute sessions over about two weeks, costing $550 each. Some insurers will pay about half of that, covering Khare’s office visit cost. Patients can receive “booster” treatments. They must sign a four-page consent form that says benefits may not be long-lasting, lists potential side effects, and in bold letters states that the treatment is not government-approved.

At a recent session, Pestikas’s seventh, she leaned back on a reclining white examining-room chair as a nurse hooked her up to a heart and blood pressure monitor. She grimaced as a needle was slipped into the top of her left palm. Khare reached up with a syringe to inject a small dose of ketamine into an IV bag hanging above the chair, then dimmed the lights, pulled the window curtains and asked if she had questions and was feeling OK.

“No questions, just grateful,” Pestikas replied, smiling.

Pestikas listened to music on her iPhone and watched psychedelic videos. She said it was like “a controlled acid trip” with pleasant hallucinations. The trip ends soon after the IV is removed, but Pestikas said she feels calm and relaxed the rest of the day, and that the mood boost can last weeks.

Studies suggest that a single IV dose of ketamine far smaller than used for sedation or partying can help many patients gain relief within about four hours and lasting nearly a week or so.

Exactly how ketamine works is unclear, but one idea is that by elevating glutamate levels, ketamine helps nerve cells re-establish connections that were disabled by depression, said ketamine expert Dr. Carlos Zarate, chief of experimental therapies at the National Institute of Mental Health.

A small Stanford University study published in August suggested that ketamine may help relieve depression by activating the brain’s opioid receptors.

Janssen Pharmaceuticals and Allergan are among drug companies developing ketamine-like drugs for depression. Janssen leads the effort with its nasal spray esketamine. The company filed a new drug application in September.

Meanwhile, dozens of studies are underway seeking to answer some of the unknowns about ketamine including whether repeat IV treatments work better for depression and if there’s a way to zero in on which patients are most likely to benefit.

Until there are answers, Zarate of the mental health institute said ketamine should be a last-resort treatment for depression after other methods have failed.

IV Vitamin Center | 703-844-0184 | Fairfax, Va 22306 | B Vitamins | IV Ketamine Treatment Center | Ketamine for Depression and Pain | Loudon Va Ketamine | 703-844-0184 Call for an appointment

 

Ketamine in the News October 2018

Loudon VA Ketamine Center | 703-844-0184 | Fairfax, Va 22306 | | IV Ketamine Treatment Center | Ketamine for Depression and Pain | Woodbridge, Va Ketamine | 703-844-0184 Call for an appointment | Ketamine Articles in the News | Ketamine Blog | Loudon Ketamine | 20147 | 20148

IV Therapies (Intravenous)

Addiction Treatment in Alexandria, VA

 

https://youtu.be/ENEeoLw-030

Ketamine for OCD | 703-844-0184 | Fairfax, Va 22306 | Ketamine Clinic | Ketamine doctors | IV Ketamine | Ketamine near me | Ketamine for obsessive compulsive disorder | 22308 | 22314 | Dr. Sendi

NOVA Health Recovery  <<< Ketamine Treatment Center Fairfax, Virginia

CAll 703-844-0184 for an immediate appointment to evaluate you for a Ketamine infusion:

Ketaminealexandria.com    703-844-0184 Call for an infusion to treat your depression. PTSD, Anxiety, CRPS, or other pain disorder today.

email@novahealthrecovery.com  << Email for questions to the doctor

Ketamine center in Fairfax, Virginia    << Ketamine infusions

Ketamine – NOVA Ketamine facebook page – ketamine treatment for depression

facebook Ketamine page

NOVA Health Recovery  << Ketamine clinic Fairfax, Va  – Call 703-844-0184 for an appointment – Fairfax, Virginia

Ketamine Consultants Blog

Ketamine Virginia = Ketamine IV Drip Doctors

The IV Medical Center - IV Vitamin Drips for wellness and recovery

The pros and cons of ketamine

Geuris “Jerry” Rivas, a native of New York, was diagnosed with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder when he was 15. Obsessions with organizing and reorganizing the belongings in his bedroom — posters, comic books, videos — took over most of his life.

Forced by germ obsessions to compulsively wash and rewash his hands, he started wearing gloves all day to both protect him from the germs and stop him from washing his hands raw. Now, at 36, OCD symptoms continue to cost him jobs and relationships. He’s managed to turn his organizational skills into a profession — he’s a home organizer and house cleaner — but still he struggles daily with his obsessions.

“It’s caused me a great deal of suffering,” Rivas says. “I’ve tried many, many medications. I’ve wasted so much of my life.”

In 2012, running out of answers, Rivas took part in the first clinical trial to test ketamine as a treatment for OCD. While ketamine is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as an anesthetic, it is also an illicit party drug known as “Special K,” with hallucinogenic effects and the potential for abuse. Over the past 10 years, dozens of small studies of ketamine’s ability to treat a variety of mood and anxiety disorders have reported remarkable results — including the sudden alleviation of treatment-resistant depression, bipolar disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. And these effects lasted days, sometimes weeks, after the hallucinogenic effects of the drug wore off.

With a single infusion of the drug, Rivas experienced for two weeks what it was like to live without the compulsions and obsessions that had for years controlled his life.

“I felt like, for the first time, I was able to function like a regular person,” he says.

Illustration of a giant K being painted by a man in a white coat

Pros and cons

Ketamine has brought hope to a psychiatric field desperate to find new treatments for severe OCD, a chronic condition marked by debilitating obsessions and repetitive behaviors. Current treatments, which include antidepressants such as Prozac, can take months to have any effect on the disease, if they work at all.

“Severe OCD takes such a toll on patients,” says Carolyn Rodriguez, MD, PhD, who as a researcher at Columbia University ran the OCD trial. Now an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford, she has continued to explore the pros and cons of using ketamine to treat OCD. “The constant, intrusive thoughts that something is contaminated, the checking and rechecking, the repetitive behaviors. It interferes with your life, your jobs, your relationships.”

Ketamine was developed in the 1960s and has been used for decades as an anesthetic during surgery. It remains a mystery just how the drug works in the brain, and there are safety concerns. There is evidence from people who take the drug routinely — in much higher doses — that chronic, high-frequency ketamine use may be associated with increased risk of bladder inflammation and cognitive impairment, Rodriguez says. And if taken regularly, it can lead to dependence.

But researchers like Rodriguez are intrigued about the drug’s potential to help them identify a whole new line of medicines for fast-acting treatment of mental health disorders.

“What most excites me about ketamine is that it works in a different way than traditional antidepressants,” Rodriguez says. “Using ketamine, we hope to understand the neurobiology that could lead to safe, fast-acting treatments. I feel that is part of my mission as a physician and researcher.”

‘Right out of a movie’

Rodriguez’s interest in ketamine as a treatment for OCD was sparked about a decade ago when she was starting out as a research scientist at Columbia. A small, placebo-controlled study published in 2006 by a mentor of hers, Carlos Zarate, MD, now chief of the section on neurobiology and treatment of mood disorders at the National Institute of Mental Health, had shown that ketamine induced dramatic improvement in treatment-resistant depression within two hours of infusion. It was a landmark study, drawing attention among the psychiatric community and launching a new field of research into the use of ketamine to treat various mood and anxiety disorders.

“What most excites me about ketamine is that it works in a different way than traditional antidepressants.”

Rodriguez, intent on searching for better, faster treatments for her patients like Rivas with OCD, took note. There was an emerging theory that ketamine affects the levels of the neurotransmitter glutamate in the brain and increasing evidence that glutamate plays a role in OCD symptoms, she says. Perhaps ketamine could help regulate OCD symptoms as well as depression.

In 2013, Rodriguez and colleagues published their results from that first clinical trial of ketamine in OCD patients. The trial randomized 15 patients with OCD to ketamine or placebo.

In those patients who were given ketamine, the effect was immediate. Patients reported dramatic decreases in their obsessive-compulsive symptoms midway through the 40-minute infusion, according to the study. The diminished symptoms lasted throughout the following week in half of the patients. Most striking were comments by the patients quoted in the study: “I tried to have OCD thoughts, but I couldn’t,” said one. Another said, “I feel as if the weight of OCD has been lifted.” A third said, “I don’t have any intrusive thoughts. … This is amazing, unbelievable. This is right out of a movie.” And while nearly all initially had dissociative effects like feelings of unreality, distortions of time or hallucinations, they were gone within two hours after the start of the infusion.

“Carolyn’s study was quite exciting,” Zarate says, adding that there were a number of similar, small but rigorous studies following his 2006 study that found fast-acting results using ketamine to treat bipolar disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder.

“We had no reason to believe that ketamine could wipe out any symptoms of these disorders within hours or days,” he says.

So how does it work?

Virtually all of the antidepressants used in the past 60 years work the same way: by raising levels of serotonin or one or two other neurotransmitters. Ketamine, however, doesn’t affect serotonin levels. Exactly what it does remains unclear.

“There’s a recognition that people like me and others are using the drug to treat patients now. There’s an incredible need for something.”

Since coming to Stanford in 2015, Rodriguez has been funded by the National Institute of Mental Health for a large clinical trial of ketamine’s effects on OCD. This five-year trial aims to follow 90 OCD patients for as long as six months after they’ve been given a dose of ketamine or an alternative drug. Rodriguez and her research team want to observe how ketamine changes participants’ brains, as well as test for side effects.

Ultimately, Rodriguez says, she hopes the study will lead to the discovery of other fast-acting drugs that work in the brain like ketamine but without its addictive potential.

Recent research in the field indicates that the glutamate hypothesis that triggered her pilot study might be further refined.

“Ketamine is a complicated drug that works on many different receptor sites,” she says. “Researchers have fixated on the NMDA receptor, one of the glutamate-type receptors, but it might not be the only receptor bringing benefit.”

In May 2016, researchers from NIMH and the University of Maryland — Zarate among them — published a study conducted in mice showing that a chemical byproduct, or metabolite, created as the body breaks down ketamine might hold the secret to its rapid antidepressant actions. This metabolite, hydroxynorketamine, reversed depressionlike symptoms in mice without triggering any of the anesthetic, dissociative or addictive side effects associated with ketamine, Zarate says.

“Ideally, we’d like to test hydroxynorketamine and possibly other drugs that act on glutamate pathways without ketamine-like side effects as possible alternatives to ketamine in OCD,” Rodriguez says.

Beyond the clubs

Meanwhile, dozens of commercial ketamine clinics have popped up across the country, making treatments available to patients who are searching for help to stop their suffering now. Medical insurance companies usually cover ketamine’s FDA-approved use as an anesthetic but won’t cover its use for other purposes, such as mental health disorders. So patients who have run out of treatment options are paying hundreds of dollars a dose for repeated ketamine infusions.

“The fact that these clinics exist is due to the desperation of patients,” says Rodriguez.

She and other researchers are calling for guidelines to protect patients and more research to learn how to use the drug safely.

“I think it’s a game changer, and it’s here to stay,” says David Feifel, MD, PhD, professor emeritus of psychiatry at UC-San Diego, who studies the effect of ketamine on clinical depression. Feifel began prescribing the drug for patients with treatment-resistant depression in 2010.

“I’ve found it to be very safe,” Feifel says, adding that the American Psychiatric Association this year issued safety guidelines on how to use ketamine clinically for treatment of depression.

“There’s a recognition that people like me and others are using the drug to treat patients now,” he says. “There’s an incredible need for something.”

The drug hasn’t worked for everyone he’s treated, Feifel says, but for many it’s been “life-changing.”

Rodriguez says she understands what motivates the clinicians to prescribe the drug now to patients in dire straits — those who are suicidal or who have tried every possible medication and therapeutic option and continue to suffer each day.

“I see it as a way to treat people whose OCD is very, very severe,” she says. “People who can’t come out of the house, who are suicidal, who have no other options.

“I just don’t like the idea of people being in pain,” Rodriguez adds. “I want to see science translated into treatments now.”

Meanwhile, researchers are learning more about the drug. Janssen Pharmaceutical is testing the efficacy of a version of ketamine, known as esketamine, as a therapy for treatment-resistant depression and for major depressive disorder with imminent risk for suicide. The FDA has fast-tracked both investigations. At Stanford, Alan Schatzberg, MD, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, along with other faculty including Rodriguez, is studying the mechanism of action for ketamine in treating depression.

Rodriguez is also interested in using ketamine to kick-start a type of cognitive behavioral therapy called exposure and response prevention, an evidence-based psychological treatment designed to help patients overcome OCD. The therapy involves teaching patients with OCD to face anxieties by refraining from ritualizing behaviors, then progressing to more challenging anxieties as they experience success.

Relaxation and other techniques also help patients tolerate their anxiety — for example, postponing the compulsion to wash their hands for at least 30 minutes, then extending that time period.

“My goal isn’t to have people taking ketamine for long periods of time,” Rodriguez says. But perhaps a short-term course of ketamine could provide its own kind of exposure and response prevention by allowing patients to experience that it is possible not to be controlled by their OCD, she says.

Rivas well remembers that infusion of ketamine he received during Rodriguez’s first clinical trial to test the drug. The rush made him feel “like Superman.”

“I felt like my body was bigger, that I was more muscular, that I could tackle anything,” he says. But that feeling only lasted the duration of the 40-minute infusion. His OCD symptoms disappeared immediately and were still gone for two weeks after.

“I was amazed that something like that would work and work so fast,” he says. His OCD symptoms today are still intrusive, but he manages to keep them under control by taking antidepressants and seeing a therapist. Still, each day when he comes home from work, he has to put gloves on before he enters his apartment building, and as soon as he enters his apartment, he must wash his hands.

“It’s a ritual now,” he says. “There has never been a time that I haven’t done that, except those two weeks after the ketamine.”

When he heard that certain private ketamine clinics are now offering the drug as treatment for OCD, he said he understands why patients take the risks and pay the high prices. As more research has become available, he’s begun considering it himself.

“I’ve been suffering through my OCD for so long, I’ve gotten to the point where I’d try anything,” he says.

USING KETAMINE TO TREAT SEVERE MENTAL ILLNESSA conversation with Stanford psychiatrist Carolyn Rodriguez, MD, PhD, about how she got interested in the use of ketamine to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder and how she is determined to find out why, in studies, the drug has provided relief from symptoms.

AUDIO Interview

Addiction Domain LINK