Ketamine Infusion Center Virginia| 703-844-0184 | NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22101 | Esketamine Provider | ESKETAMINE CENTER | ESKETAMINE DOCTOR | 703-844-0184 | ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 22207 22213 | NOVA HEALTH RECOVERY | DR. SENDI | ESKETAMINE PROVIDER | NASAL SPRY KETAMINE THERAPY | KETAMINE FOR TREATMENT OF DEPRESSION, PTSD, ANXIETY | KETAMINE INFUSION CENTER | KETAMINE DEPRESSION | KETAMINE PTSD | EMAIL@NOVAHEALTHRECOVERY.COM | 2220 22182 23103 22039 20197 20184 22101 22102 22066 | CBD DOCTOR CBD CENTER | 703-844-0184 | FAIRFAX, VA 22034 | 22308 | ESKETAMINE LOUDON COUNTY, VA | ESKETAMINE ANNANDALE, VA | ESKETAMINE RICHMOND | ESKETAMINE VIRGINIA | KETAMINE SPRAY PROVIDER IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA 22308 | KETAMINE INFUSION CENTER | KETAMINE VIRGINIA | ESKETAMINE VIRGINIA | 703-844-0184 FOR AN APPOINTMENT | CBD PROVIDER | CBD CENTER | CBD VIRGINIA | DR. SENDI

NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22306 | Call for esketamine and nasal ketamine as well as IV Ketamine for depression, PTSD, anxiety  703-844-0184 < Link



NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22306 | Call for esketamine and nasal ketamine as well as IV Ketamine for depression, PTSD, anxiety  703-844-0184 < Link

Ketamine Virginia Link

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Intranasal Ketamine in Major
Depressive Disorder

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Intranasal Ketamine in Major Depressive Disorder

Abstract
Background—The N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist ketamine, delivered via
an intravenous route, has shown rapid antidepressant effects in patients with treatment-resistant
depression. The current study was designed to test the safety, tolerability and efficacy of intranasal
ketamine in patients with depression who had failed at least one prior antidepressant trial.
Methods—Twenty patients with major depression were randomized and 18 completed two
treatment days with intranasal ketamine hydrochloride (50 mg) or saline solution in a randomized,
double-blind, crossover study. The primary efficacy outcome measure was change in depression
severity 24 hours following ketamine or placebo, measured using the Montgomery-Asberg
Depression Rating Scale. Secondary outcomes included persistence of benefit, changes in selfreports of depression, changes in anxiety, and proportion of responders. Potential
psychotomimetic, dissociative, hemodynamic, and general adverse effects associated with
ketamine were also measured.

Results—Patients showed significant improvement in depressive symptoms at 24 hours
following ketamine compared to placebo [t=4.39, p<0.001; estimated mean MADRS score
difference of 7.6 ± 3.7 (95% CI: 3.9 – 11.3)]. Eight of 18 patients (44%) met response criteria 24
hours following ketamine administration, compared to 1 of 18 (6%) following placebo (p=0.033).
Intranasal ketamine was well tolerated with minimal psychotomimetic or dissociative effects and
was not associated with clinically significant changes in hemodynamic parameters.

Conclusions—This study provides the first controlled evidence for the rapid antidepressant
effects of intranasal ketamine. Treatment was associated with minimal adverse effects. If
replicated, these findings may lead to novel approaches to the pharmacologic treatment of patients
with major depression

Intranasal ketamine has shown safety and efficacy as an anesthetic and analgesic agent (16–
20). In particular, intranasal ketamine has been successfully used in the treatment of
headache and pain in ambulatory patients (21–23). In one study, 50 mg of ketamine
administered intranasally was well tolerated and led to symptomatic improvement in chronic
pain (23). The objective of the current proof of concept clinical trial was to test the rapid
antidepressant effect of a single 50 mg administration of ketamine via an intranasal route in
patients with major depression who had failed to respond to at least one prior antidepressant
trial. Based on accumulating evidence supporting the efficacy and tolerability of ketamine
administered IV in depression, and prior research examining intranasal ketamine in pain, we
hypothesized that a dose of 50 mg, administered via an intranasal route, would be safe, well
tolerated and lead to a rapid reduction in depressive symptoms.

DISCUSSION
In the current study we found that a single dose of 50 mg of ketamine administered via
intranasal route was associated with a rapid antidepressant response in patients with major
depression who had failed at least one prior antidepressant trial. A significant antidepressant
effect of ketamine was detected as early as 40 min following administration and there was a
large difference in depression severity between the treatment conditions at the 24-hour
primary outcome (mean difference in MADRS score of 7.6 ± 3.7). In aggregate, there was
significant antidepressant benefit following ketamine compared to placebo over the full 7-
day assessment period, although when comparing individual time points the treatment
conditions no longer separated at 72 hours or 7 days. Ketamine was associated with
significant improvement in anxiety symptoms and self-reports of depressive symptoms at 24
hours. Intranasal ketamine was well tolerated with only very minimal increases in
dissociation, psychosis-like symptoms or hemodynamic parameters. This study provides the
first randomized, controlled evidence that intranasal ketamine is safe, well tolerated, and
effective for rapid reduction of depressive symptoms in patients with MDD and at least mild
treatment resistance.
In comparison with prior studies of ketamine administered IV (at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg) in
depression, our observed magnitude of antidepressant effect with intranasal administration
may be somewhat reduced. Murrough et al. reported a mean ketamine-placebo difference of
7.95 points (95% CI: 3.20–12.71) on the MADRS 24 hours following a single IV infusion
and a response rate of 64% (15). Response rates as high as 70% following IV administration
have been reported in some studies (11, 15), though other studies have reported response
rates from 50% to as low as 30% following IV ketamine (28, 29). Our mean drug-placebo
difference is in line with what has been previously reported (7.6 ± 3.7 points on the
MADRS), although the proportion of responders in our study may be somewhat lower at
44%. This lower proportion of treatment responders may be consistent with the lower blood
ketamine levels achieved in our study compared to levels previously reported following IV
administration. In our sample, the mean ketamine blood level was 72 ng/mL at 20 min and
84 ng/mL at 40 min. In contrast, mean ketamine levels reported following IV infusion
(0.5mg/kg) are approximately 150 ng/mL at 30 min and 200 ng/mL at 40 min. (27, 30, 31).
It is currently not known if efficacy equivalent to IV administration can be obtained by
intranasal administration in the case that comparable blood levels can be achieved.

We report a significant improvement in anxiety symptoms at 24 hours, assessed with the
HAM-A. Two studies of IV ketamine for bipolar depression reported a significant
improvement in anxiety symptoms measured with the HAM-A and a visual analog scale(27,
32). However, previous studies of patients with unipolar TRD have not described effects of
IV ketamine on anxiety, with the exception of an early RCT (11) and an open label study
(33) reporting significant improvement in psychic anxiety measured as an individual
symptom on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and another open-label study reporting
significant decrease in anxiety symptoms on the HAM-A at +230 minutes (34).
Previous studies of IV ketamine in depression have reported elevations in measures of
psychotomimetic, dissociative and hemodynamic parameters (11, 13, 35). In our study, the
ketamine group experienced a very limited increase in dissociation at +40 min as measured
by the CADSS (mean 1.4 points; scale range 0–92). In comparison, Murrough et al. reported
a larger dissociative effect 40 min following ketamine administered IV [mean CADSS score
of 14.7 points (95% CI: 10.6–18.8)] (15). A similar pattern was observed for psychotic-like
effects measured using the BPRS+ (11, 15). We also observed comparatively small changes
in hemodynamic parameters. No patient met protocol criteria for interventions. Studies of IV
ketamine in depression have reported relatively greater changes in hemodynamic parameters
(mean systolic BP increase of 19.0 versus our 7.6 mmHg at +40mins relative to baseline)
(15). The reduced magnitude of acute behavioral and hemodynamic changes observed in the
current study may be consistent with the lower blood levels achieved compared to prior
studies with ketamine administered IV, as discussed above.
The bioavailability of ketamine administered via an intranasal route has been reported to be
between 25–50% (36). A study in healthy volunteers comparing administration methods
found intranasal ketamine bioavailability of 45%, higher than subligual, oral, or rectal
administration and found no significant differences in pharmacokinetics between
preparations, including injection (37). Additionally, this study found conversion to
norketamine was more similar between intranasal and injection than the other administration
methods, suggesting that first-pass metabolism is relatively absent with intranasal
administration. The area under the ketamine and norketamine plasma concentration-time
curves in that study was lowest for intranasal administration but was found to increase
almost linearly with doses from 25 to 50mg (37). In previous studies of IV ketamine in
depression, peak norketamine blood levels of approximately 20–50 ng/mL have been
reported (30, 31). In line with these findings, the mean norketamine level in our study was
46 ng/mL at 40 min.
We selected our dose of 50 mg largely based on a previous study using a similar design and
the same dose in patients with a chronic pain disorder (23). Based on an expected
bioavailability of intranasal ketamine between 25–50% (36), our dose may be approximately
equivalent to 0.15 – 0.34 mg/kg administered IV. Although this is lower than the standard
0.5 mg/kg IV frequently used in ketamine depression studies, we reasoned that this dose was
appropriate from a safety perspective given that the administration period in the current
study is relatively short (20 min versus 40 min or longer in IV studies). Clearly, much more
research is required in order to determine the optimal dose, duration, frequency and route of
administration of ketamine for depression



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *