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The Psychopharmacology of Depression: Strategies, Formulations, and Future Implications

 

With well over two dozen traditional antidepressants available in the US, and an ever-growing list of other psychotropic compounds with apparent antidepressant properties, pharmacological options for treating clinical depression today are broad and vast. However, recent findings suggest that the magnitude of efficacy for most antidepressants compared with placebo may be more modest than previously thought.1Most depressed patients do not respond fully to a first antidepressant trial, and with each consequent trial, there is less chance of symptom remission.2 About one-third of patients receiving long-term treatment report persistent moderate-to-severe depression.3 Hence, there remains more than a little room for improvement.

Since the late 1950s, the traditional view of treating depression has focused on the role of monoamines (serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine) as the main targets for medications. Newer treatments are looking beyond effects on monoamines as potential strategies to leverage depressive symptoms.

A major challenge for progress in novel pharmacotherapies has been our lack of a full understanding about the causes of depression. Advances in functional neuroimaging and genetic markers have begun to shed new light on brain regions and pathways associated with aberrant neural functioning in depression, but not in ways that have led to treatments aimed at remedying its pathogenesis. This makes it hard to think of antidepressant medications as “treating” the pathophysiology of depression (as when antibiotics eliminate the cause of an infection); rather, antidepressant relieve symptoms by counteracting or compensating for depression’s consequences (as when diuretics alleviate peripheral edema regardless of its etiology).

Gone are the days of oversimplified theories that depression is caused by a “chemical imbalance.” More likely, depression involves changes in brain architecture and the interplay of complex circuits in which chemicals, or neurotransmitters, are the messengers of information, rather than the causes of faulty functioning. Table 1 summarizes some of the major conceptual shifts that have occurred in thinking about the probable causes of depression (or at least its neurobiological context), which sets the stage for new ways to consider innovative treatment strategies. Looking beyond the role of monoamines as treatment targets in depression, a number of novel therapeutic strategies have begun to receive growing interest in preclinical and clinical trials. Key points about emerging novel depression pharmacotherapies are summarized in Table 2, and described more fully below.

Subanesthetically dosed intravenous (IV) ketamine currently represents perhaps the most dramatic and innovative antidepressant pharmacotherapy to emerge in decades.4,5 It is pharmacodynamically unique in its rapid onset (hours rather than days to weeks) and its potential ability to reduce suicidal ideation after a single dose, independent of its antidepressant properties.6 (While both lithium and clozapine have been shown to reduce suicidal behaviors, neither has been shown to reduce ideation, much less in the same day after a single dose.) Meta-analyses suggest that 0.5 mg/kg IV ketamine produces nearly a 10-fold greater likelihood of response than placebo at day 1 and a 4- to 5-fold likelihood of sustained response after one week.7

The exact psychotropic mechanism of action of ketamine remains elusive. Initial work focused on blockade of ionotropic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors as accounting broadly for its antidepressant effects. However, subsequent negative randomized trials with other NMDA receptor antagonists (such as riluzole8) redirected interest toward ketamine’s other, non-NMDA receptor-related mechanisms, such as sigma receptor agonism, mu opioid receptor antagonism, or midbrain monoaminergic inhibition. Other authors have suggested that at low doses, ketamine’s antidepressant effects may derive from an increase in glutamate transmission with increased α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor expression, leading to increased release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).9Murrough and colleagues10 recently observed the necessity of AMPA receptor activation for the antidepressant effects of ketamine. They reported that “directly targeting the NMDA [receptor] may not be required.” As noted by the American Psychiatric Association Council on Research Task Force on Novel Biomarkers and Treatments,11 future advances will depend on a better understanding of the many mechanisms of action relative to the antidepressant properties of ketamine.

Ketamine is currently not approved by the FDA as a treatment for depression. Uncertainty remains as to whether repeated dosing is safe, effective, and necessary to avoid relapse and, if so, when, at what frequency, and for how long. The aforementioned APA Council on Research Consensus Statement on ketamine treatment for depression11 stated that while some clinics already offer 2- to 3-week courses of ketamine delivered 2 to 3 times per week, “there remain no published data that clearly supports this practice, and . . . the relative benefit of each ketamine infusion [should] be considered in light of the potential risks associated with longer term exposure to ketamine and the lack of published evidence for prolonged efficacy with ongoing administration.” 11 Thus far, studies of other pharmacotherapies to sustain an initial ketamine response (such as riluzole or lithium) have proven no better than placebo.

Enantiomeric esketamine remains investigational as a possible easier-to-administer intranasal (IN) antidepressant, although IN bioavailability is only about half that of IV ketamine’s 100%. Two randomized multi-site trials of IN esketamine added to antidepressants showed dose-related better efficacy than placebo: Daly and colleagues12 found that 28 mg to 84 mg of IN ketamine twice weekly over two weeks produced significant improvement in depressive symptoms as compared to placebo beginning after 1 week and continuing through week 9 for the majority of responders. A study by Canuso and colleagues13 demonstrated a significant reduction in depressive symptoms within 4 hours of administration (56 mg to 84 mg insufflated over 15 minutes) and a medium to large effect size, sustained after 25 days; suicidal ideation reduced significantly at 4 hours but not beyond that time. Another recent randomized pilot trial of IN racemic ketamine (the mixture of S- and R-ketamine) was prematurely discontinued due to poor tolerability (including cardiovascular and neurological adverse effects) and highly variable absorption across subjects.14

Modulation of the endogenous opioid system has long been a target of interest in the treatment of mood disorders, but it is limited by safety risks, tolerance, and addiction potential. Recent work has focused on a proprietary combination of the μ-opioid partial agonist/kappa antagonist buprenorphine plus the μ-opioid receptor antagonist samidorphan (ALKS 5461). The potent blockade of μ-opioid receptors in samidorphan, which prevents buprenorphine access to these receptors, effectively renders buprenorphine a selective kappa opiate receptor (KOR) antagonist, which is its putative antidepressant mechanism. After initial favorable Phase II trials, in 2013 the FDA granted ALKS 5461 fast track status for accelerated regulatory review as an antidepressant adjunct. Subsequent randomized trials in treatment-resistant major depression revealed statistically significant differences from placebo on some, but not all, depressive symptom outcome measures and at some, but not all, doses studied.15,16 The FDA initially refused to review the new drug application for ALKS 5461 as an adjunctive therapy for depression because of concerns about bioavailability and lack of evidence, but then reversed its position. ALKS 5461 is currently under regulatory review and a decision regarding its possible approval is expected by early 2019.

Antiinflammatories and immunomodulators

There has been growing recognition of complex interrelationships between depression and inflammation. Some but not all patients with clinically significant depression appear to have elevated serum markers of systemic inflammation, such as high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and inflammatory cytokines. While causal relationships between depression and inflammation are poorly understood and questions remain whether depression causes inflammation or vice versa, randomized trial data suggest potential antidepressant value of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), particularly the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. A pooled meta-analysis of 5447 participants from 10 NSAID trials and 4 cytokine inhibitors (as mono- or add-on therapy for depression) revealed statistically significant advantages over placebo, with small to medium effect sizes, for response (odds ratio = 6.6; 95% confidence interval=2.2-19.4) or remission (odds ratio = 7.9; 95% confidence interval=2.9-21.1)17It has not been established whether adding celecoxib or other NSAIDs to an antidepressant may be more useful only in the setting of elevated serum markers of inflammation. Elsewhere, preliminary studies reveal that inflammatory depressive subtypes (ie, high baseline hs-CRP) may respond better to a tricyclic than SSRI,18 adjunctive L-methylfolate,19 or the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonist infliximab (admnistered IV at 5 mg/kg over 3 doses).20

The antimicrobial minocycline exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties and has been preliminarily studied mostly in small or open/nonrandomized trials. A meta-analysis of 3 randomized controlled trials found an overall significantly greater effect than placebo with a medium to large effect size and good tolerability, although the small number of well-designed studies and samples sizes (total N = 158) limits their generalizability.21

Anticholinergic muscarinic agents

Harkening back to the 1970s hypothesis that depression could reflect cholinergic-adrenergic dysregulation, interest has turned to the possible antidepressant effects of the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist scopolamine. Preliminary studies of intravenous scopolamine dosed at 4 µg/kg in both unipolar and bipolar depression have produced remission rates from 45% to 56% (Cohen’s d ranged from 1.2-3.4) typically within several days of administration, with persistence for 10 to 14 days.22Antimuscarinic adverse effects such as sedation, dry mouth, and blurry vision are common but transient. Neurocognitive measures reaction time during selective attention tasks reveal no significant delays following IV scopolamine infusion.23 Analogous to IV ketamine, questions remain about the optimal number of infusions to minimize relapse as well as the use of nonparenteral formulations.

Brexanolone (SAGE-547), also known as allopregnanolone, is a positive allosteric modulator of GABA-A receptors. It is a progesterone metabolite that exerts neuroprotective, pro-cognitive, and possible antidepressant/anxiolytic properties. Precipitous drops in progesterone and allopregnanolone after childbirth prompted interest in the use of allopregnanolone specifically in postpartum depression. A small (N = 21) initial trial of brexanolone (administered intravenously because of its short half-life and poor oral bioavailability) or placebo for severe postpartum depression yielded a substantial reduction in depressive symptom severity within 60 hours (effect size = 1.2).24 Further data remain pending. SAGE-217 is reformulated brexanolone that has good oral bioavailability, allowing for oral administration, as well as a longer half-life allowing once-a-day dosing. It is currently being studied as an adjunctive agent for treatment resistant depression.

PPAR-γ agonists and incretins

Thiazolidinediones are insulin sensitizers that also demonstrate antidepressant properties in animal studies and appear to possess anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, antioxidant and anti-excitatory properties. Pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist thiazolidinedione, has been studied versus placebo or metformin in major depression, both as monotherapy and in combination with antidepressants or lithium. A meta-analysis of 4 trials revealed significantly higher remission rates than controls (27% versus 10%, respectively; odds ratio of remission in major depression = 5.9 (95% confidence interval=1.6-22.4), p = .009), with an NNT = 6.25 Even though PPAR-γ agonists can decrease insulin resistance, weight gain can be an undesired adverse effect that is possibly a result of a combination of fat cell proliferation, fluid retention, and increased appetite. Pioglitazone also carries serious adverse risks for congestive heart failure and bladder cancer.

Glucagon-like peptide 1

Another class of antidiabetic drugs known as glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) agonists mimic the action of insulin (so-called incretins) and are of interest as a potential target for depression. GLP-1 agonists such as liraglutide possess neuroprotective and antiapoptotic properties, and animal studies suggest it has antidepressant and pro-cognitive effects, particularly involving reward and motivation. Human studies have thus far focused more on weight-reducing and possible cognitive benefits of liraglutide more than its potential antidepressant efficacy, but its mechanism represents a promising direction for further study.

Future directions

This brief overview has focused on emerging novel pharmacotherapies for depression. While the provisional nature of proof-of-concept studies may be encouraging, they are far from definitive. The aforementioned findings are largely preliminary and meant more to prompt larger randomized trials to establish efficacy, safety, and generalizability rather than inspire premature immediate uptake into clinical practice.

Given the focus on neuroprotection and enhanced neuroplasticity as proposed targets of treatment, it would seem remiss not to at least mention the neurobiological impact of depression-specific psychotherapies, mindfulness meditation, and related psychosocial interventions. Psychotherapy is, among other things, a behavioral learning paradigm, presumably rendering alterations in cognitive functions (memory, attention, and decision-making), fear extinction, and emotional processing. Evidence-based psychotherapies for depression have been shown to produce changes in brain network connectivity26 (recapitulating the idea of Hebbian synapses, where “neurons that fire together wire together”) and upregulation of intracellular transcription factors involved in neuronal plasticity.27Enhanced neuroplasticity may represent a common denominator target for effective biological or psychosocial treatments for depression.

Increasingly, drugs we call antidepressants are diversifying to include broader classes of molecules. A more neuroscience-based nomenclature for psychotropic drugs has already been proposed28 and will no doubt invoke more novel drug mechanisms, supplanting older concepts about depression as a chemical imbalance as perspectives continue to evolve about how antidepressants impact neuronal viability and brain microarchitecture.

References:

1. Cipriani A, Furukawa TA, Salanti G,et al.Comparative efficacy and acceptability of 21 antidepressant drugs for the acute treatment of adults with major depressive disorder: a systematic review and network meta-analysis. Lancet 2018; S0140-6736:32802-7. [Epub ahead of print]

2. Trivedi MH, Rush AJ, Wisniewski SR, et al. Evaluation of outcomes with citalopram for depression using measurement-based care in STAR*D: implications for clinical practice. Am J Psychiatry. 2006;163:28-40.

3. Cartwright C, Gibson K, Read J, et al. Long-term antidepressant use: patient perspectives of benefits and adverse effects. Patient Prefer Adher. 2016;10:1401-1407.

4. Zarate CA Jr., Singh JB, Carlson PJ, et al. A randomized trial of an N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist in treatment-resistant major depression. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006;63:856-864.

5. Murrough JW, Iosifescu DV, Chang LC, et al. Antidepressant efficacy of ketamine in treatment-resistant major depression: a two-site randomized controlled trial. Am J Psychiatry. 2013;170:1134-1142.

6. Wilkinson ST, Ballard ED, Bloch MH, et al. The effect of a single dose of intravenous ketamine on suicidal ideation: a systematic review and individual participant data meta-analysis. Am J Psychiatry. 2018;175:150-158.

7. Newport DJ, Carpenter LL, McDonald WM, et al. Ketamine and other NMDA antagonists: early clinical trials and possible mechanisms in depression. Am J Psychiatry. 2015;172:950-966.

8. Mathew SJ, Gueorguieva R, Brandt C, et al. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, sequential parallel comparison design trial of adjunctive riluzole for treatment-resistant major depressive disorder. Neuropsychopharmacol 2017;42: 2567-2574.

9. Duman RS, Li N, Liu RJ, et al. Signaling pathways underlying the rapid antidepressant actions of ketamine. Neuropharmacol. 2012;62:35-41.

10. Murrough JW, Abdallah CG, Mathew SJ. Targeting glutamate signalling in depression: progress and prospects. Nat Rev Drug Discov. 2017;16:472-486.

11. Sanacora G, Frye MA, McDonald W, et al. A consensus statement on the use of ketamine in the treatment of mood disorders. JAMA Psychiatry. 2017;74:399-405.

12. Daly EJ, Singh JB, Fedgchin M, et al. Efficacy and safety of intranasal esketamine adjunctive to oral antidepressant therapy in treatment-resistant depression: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Psychiatry. 2018;75:139-148.

13. Canuso CM, Singh JB, Fedgchin M, et al. Efficacy and safety of intranasal esketamine for the rapid reduction of symptoms of depression and suicidality in patients at imminent risk for suicide: results of a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Am J Psychiatry. April 2018; Epub ahead of print.

14. Gálvez V, Li A, Huggins C, et al. Repeated intranasal ketamine for treatment-resistant depression – the way to go? Results from a pilot randomised controlled trial. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2018;32:397-407.

15. Ehrich E, Turncliff R, Du Y, et al. Evaluation of opioid modulation in major depressive disorder. Neuropsychopharmacol. 2015;40:1448-1455.

16. Fava M, Memisoglu A, Thase ME, et al. Opioid modulation with buprenorphine/samidorphan as adjunctive treatment for inadequate response to antidepressants: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Am J Psychiatry. 2016;173:499-508.

17. Köhler O, Benros ME, Nordentoft M, et al. Effect of anti-inflammatory treatment on depression, depressive symptoms, and adverse effects: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. JAMA Psychiatry. 2014;71:1381-1391.

18. Uher R, Tansey KE, Dew T, et al. An inflammatory biomarker as a differential predictor of outcome of depression treatment with escitalopram and nortriptyline. Am J Psychiatry. 2014;171:1278-1286.

19. Papakostas GI, Shelton RC, Zajecka JM, et al. Effect of adjunctive L-methylfolate 15 mg among inadequate responders to SSRIs in depressed patients who were stratified by biomarker levels and genotype: results from a randomized clinical trial. J Clin Psychiatry. 2014;75:855-863.

20. Raison CL, Rutheford RE, Woolwine BJ, et al. A randomized controlled trial of the tumor necrosis factor antagonist infliximab for treatment-resistant depression: the role of baseline inflammatory biomarkers. JAMA Psychiatry. 2013;70:31-41.

21. Rosenblat JD, McIntyre RS. Efficacy and tolerability of minocycline for depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials. J Affect Disord. 2018;227:219-225.

22. Drevets WC, Zarate CA Jr, Furey ML. Antidepressant effects of the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist scopolamine: a review. Biol Psychiatry. 2013;73:1156-1163.

23. Furey ML Pietrini P, Haxby JV, et al. Selective effects of cholinergic modulation on task performance during selective attention. Neuropsychopharmacol 2008; 33:913-923.

24. Kanes S, Colquohoun H, Grunduz-Bruce H, et al. Brexanolone (SAGE-547 injection) in post-partum depression: a randomised controlled trial. Lancet. 2017;390:480-489.

25. Colle R, de Larminat D, Rotenberg S, et al. Pioglitazone could induce remission in major depression: a meta-analysis. Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat 2016;13: 9-16.

26.Yang CC, Barrós-Loscertales A, Pinazo D, et al. State and training effects of mindfulness meditation on brain networks reflect neuronal mechanisms of its antidepressant effect. Neural Plast. 2016;2016:9504642.

27. Koch JM, Hinze-Selch D, Stingele K, et al. Changes in CREB phosphorylation and BDNF plasma levels during psychotherapy of depression. Psychother Psychosom. 2009;78:187-192.

28. ECNP Neuroscience Applied. Neuroscience-based Nomenclature. https://www.ecnp.eu/research-innovation/nomenclature.aspx. Accessed June 6, 2018.

Ketamine for Depression | Articles and Links | 703-844-0184 | Springfield, Virginia |22306 | IV Ketamine Center | Ketamine Clinic | 22304| Ketamine Virginia

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Ketamine for Chronic Pain & Depression

Intravenous Ketamine is proving to be a tremendous treatment for intractable depression as well as chronic pain.  About half the patients treated respond positively with results lasting up to a week in most of the responders.

It has emerged as a treatment option for a variety of chronic pain conditions including fibromyalgia, small fiber neuropathy, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) and psychiatric conditions including depression, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), suicidal ideation, and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

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Low-dose ketamine for treatment resistant depression in an academic clinical practice setting.

Symptomatology and predictors of antidepressant efficacy in extended responders to a single ketamine infusion.

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The use of ketamine as an antidepressant: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Ketamine for rapid reduction of suicidal ideation: a randomized controlled trial.

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Rapid and longer-term antidepressant effects of repeated ketamine infusions in treatment-resistant major depression.

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Case Report Details Use of Buprenorphine for Treatment of Kratom Dependence

 

Kratom is an herbal supplement that shares structural similarities with opioid analgesics

Kratom is an herbal supplement that shares structural similarities with opioid analgesics

Opioid-like dependence due to chronic kratom use can be successfully treated with buprenorphine, according to a recent case report published in the Journal of Addiction Medicine.

Kratom, an herbal supplement that shares structural similarities with opioid analgesics, has recently grown in popularity as an unapproved opioid replacement therapy. The drug is easily obtained via the Internet (as it does not require a prescription), but oftentimes contains higher than typical doses and may be mixed with adulterants, increasing the risk of toxicity.

In their article, the authors report on two patients who used kratom to self-treat their chronic pain after they could no longer receive opioid analgesics from healthcare providers. Both patients presented to the clinic with evidence of kratom dependence and withdrawal and underwent home initiation of sublingual buprenorphine-naloxone therapy. In each case, transitioning to buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance led to control of both their chronic pain and opioid withdrawal symptoms.

RELATED ARTICLES

“Although some debate whether kratom is a true opioid or not, this case series shows that opioid agonist treatment with buprenorphine-naloxone is effective for some patients with kratom dependence and demonstrates 2 safe home initiations of buprenorphine,” concluded the authors.

 

Treatment of Kratom Dependence With Buprenorphine

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Ketamine has ‘truly remarkable’ effect on depression and is effective in elderly patients, scientists say

Ketamine Infusions | 703-844-0184 | Fairfax, Va | 22304 | ketamine for depression

Ketamine can have a “truly remarkable” effect on people with depression, researchers have said after a new study showed promising results among elderly patients.

Colleen Loo, a professor at the University of New South Wales in Australia, led the world’s first randomised control trial into the drug’s effect on people over 60 with treatment-resistant depression.

“This trial has shown ketamine can be used safely in the elderly and it tends to be effective,” she told The Independent, adding that a similar effect was observed in this age group as in younger patients.

It is important to test how people of different ages respond to a new treatment before it can be offered by doctors, she said: “Sometimes depression in the elderly can be harder to treat, especially with medication.

“Also, they tend to have more medical problems, which can interfere with medication.”

Ketamine was discovered in 1962 and is licenced for medical use in the UK as an anaesthetic, but is also used illegally as a recreational drug.

Of the study’s 16 participants, 11 reported an improvement in their condition while being treated with the drug, according to the research published in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.

After six months, 43 per cent of the subjects said they had no significant symptoms of depression – a high rate given that the participants had not responded to previous treatment, said Professor Loo.

“It is truly remarkable the way ketamine can work,” she said. “Other people have also found you get a rapid and powerful effect after a single dose of ketamine.”

“Some people mistakenly think we are inducing a temporary, drug-induced euphoria and people are ‘out of it’, which is why they’re not depressed.

“But the effects take place in the first hour, and they’re not euphoric at all. In fact, all of our research participants disliked them. They considered them adverse effects.

“The antidepressant effect kicks in a few hours later and are maximised about 20 hours later, when you’re fully alert and in your usual state of mind.”

While research into the use of ketamine to treat mental health problems is still in its early stages, scientists at Oxford University have said their studies show the drug can provide relief to patients with severe depression “where nothing has helped before”.

Rupert McShane, the consultant psychiatrist who is leading Oxford’s ketamine treatment programme, told The Independent it was “good to see that, contrary to some reports, some older people do respond to ketamine.”

“This study highlights that ketamine can be given in a variety of ways (not just intravenous), that it’s a good idea to adjust the dose, and that the more resistant someone’s depression is, the higher the dose that they are likely to need,” he said.

Professor Loo and her colleagues delivered ketamine to the patients using a small injection under the skin – similar to the insulin jabs given to diabetes patients.

This makes the drug easier and quicker to administer than the intravenous infusions used in other trials, which require a machine pump to regulate the dose and takes up to an hour to complete.

Participants received increasing doses of ketamine over a period of five weeks, with the dose personalised for each patient.

However, she warned that while the research is one step closer to providing a model for how doctors could prescribe ketamine as a treatment for depression in future, it would still be “premature to jump into clinical practice”.

“There are ‘super-responders’, who after a single treatment can be well for several months,” said Professor Loo, giving the example of a subject who, in 2014, remained free of depressive symptoms for five months after just one dose of ketamine.

But “most people are well but then they relapse over around three to seven days,” she said. “That’s where repeated dosing comes in.”

Ketamine Injections May Help Older Adults With Depression

Repeated subcutaneous injections of ketamine significantly improved symptoms in a small group of older adults with treatment-resistant depression, researchers found in a pilot study published online in The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.

The randomized controlled trial is the first to assess the efficacy and safety of ketamine in the geriatric patient population.

“These findings take us a big step forward as we begin to fully understand the potential and limitations of ketamine’s antidepressant qualities,” said lead author Colleen Loo, MD, a professor in the School of Psychiatry at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Psychiatrists Issue ‘Much-needed’ Consensus on Ketamine for Mood Disorders

“Not only was ketamine well-tolerated by participants, with none experiencing severe or problematic side effects, but giving the treatment by a simple subcutaneous injection (a small injection under the skin) was also shown to be an acceptable method for administering the drug in a safe and effective way.”

Overall, the response and remission rate for older adults receiving ketamine was 68.8%.

Australian researchers tested individualized dosing of ketamine using a dose-titration method in 16 adults age 60 and older. Participants received increasing doses over 5 weeks. The double-blind, placebo-controlled trial included 1 session in which participants received an active treatment substitute that, similar to ketamine, caused sedation.

Why Not Make Ketamine a First-line Treatment?

After the randomized controlled trial, participants received 12 ketamine doses in an open-label phase.

At a 6-month follow-up, 7 of 14 older adults who had completed the randomized controlled trial had depression remission — 5 of whom remitted at doses below the common ketamine dose of 0.5 mg/kg, researchers reported. Repeated treatments, they added, resulted in a higher likelihood of remission or a longer time to relapse.

“Elderly patients with severe depression face additional barriers when seeking treatment for the condition. Many medications may cause more side effects or have lower efficacy as the brain ages,” said researcher Duncan George, MBBS, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales. “Older people are also more likely to have comorbidities like neurodegenerative disorders and chronic pain, which can cause further complications due to ketamine’s reported side effects.

“Our results indicate a dose-titration method may be particularly useful for older patients, as the best dose was selected for each individual person to maximize ketamine’s benefits while minimizing its adverse side effects.”

—Jolynn Tumolo

References

George D, Gálvez V, Martin D, et al. Pilot randomized controlled trial of titrated subcutaneous ketamine in older patients with treatment-resistant depression. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2017 June 13;[Epub ahead of print].

World-first ketamine trial shows promise for geriatric depression [press release]. Sydney, Australia: University of New South Wales; July 24, 2017.

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Poster Number: EI 5
Ketamine in Late Life Treatment-Resistant Depression
Erika Heard, MD1
; Yousuf Sohail, MD1
; Anusuiya Nagar, MD1
; Oliver M. Glass, MD2
; Adriana P. Hermida, MD1

Introduction: Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic, which provides antagonism on the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)
receptor. Several studies have demonstrated rapid anti-depressant and anti-suicidal effects from the administration of ketamine
in adult patients but studies in late life patients are lacking. While ketamine may increase sympathetic stimulation and cause
decreased respiratory rate in geriatric patients, it is still nonetheless considered a safe agent. Low-dose intravenous infusion of
ketamine is gaining popularity in the treatment for treatment-resistant depression (TRD) in late life patients. We provide a case
report on a patient in late life who suffered from TRD and was treated with ketamine.
Methods: A case report of the use of intravenous ketamine to treat a geriatric patient with TRD along with a literature review
of the subject.
Results: A 76-year-old female with a history of hypertension and arthritis presented with worsening depressive symptoms for the
past two years. She endorsed neuro-vegetative symptoms of depressed mood, poor appetite, unintentional 25-pound weight loss,
and conflicted feelings about wanting to live. She also reported difficulties with concentration and memory, feelings of
worthlessness, and psychomotor retardation. Her daughter stated she was more vegetative and had a strong desire not to live alone.
QIDS (Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology) baseline was 23. She had previous trials of multiple medications including
paroxetine, fluoxetine, sertraline, escitalopram, buproprion, and venlafaxine. This patient showed poor tolerance to all the
medications and at the time of assessment was taking mirtazapine 7.5 mg and duloxetine 60 mg. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)
was recommended; however, the patient was found to be not a good candidate as per anesthesiology due to multiple comorbidities.
As a result, mirtazapine was titrated to 15 mg nightly while duloxentine was continued at 60 mg daily. Patient was started on
intravenous ketamine infusions of 20 mg (0.5 mg/kg) over 40 minutes. Patient tolerated the acute course of ketamine, which was
administered twice per week. Patient and daughter reported clinicial improvement after the first infusion with noticeable
improvement in QIDS (23 to 12) after 6 acute sessions without adverse effects. Improved symptoms included brighter affect,
increased energy, decreased anhedonia, increased daily activity, improved appetite (gained 40lbs), and being more engaged in the
community. Additionally, she began to take care of herself again. She has received 17 ketamine treatments with latest QIDS score of
1. After 6 acute infusion sessions, she was tapered to once per week, then once per 10 days, once per 2 weeks and then to a once
every three week schedule before discontinuing. The patient continued to report improvements. The literature on intravenous
ketamine infusions has shown effectiveness in reducing depressive symptoms in cases of TRD. The patient presented in this study
demonstrates promise of the use of ketamine in late life depression patients. This case also highlights that ketamine can be an
alternative option for elderly patients with TRD who do not qualify for ECT. Within the geriatric population, comorbid medical
conditions and polypharmacy may increase the chance of morbidity and mortality. Ketamine infusions at a low dose must be
monitored closely over a course of time. Therefore, ketamine infusions should only be administered to TRD patients in facilities
where appropriate medical monitoring can occur. Geriatric patients who are given ketamine infusions should be assessed for the
development of dependency, and addiction given its abuse potential. Further research on this novel therapy will yield greater
knowledge of how to best utilize ketamine infusions in geriatric patients.
Conclusions: The literature on intravenous ketamine infusions has shown effectiveness in reducing depressive symptoms in cases of
TRD. Similarly, our patient had a decline in depressive symptoms and a positive outcome. The case highlights that ketamine can be
used as an alternative for the TRD population that may not qualify for ECT. Within the geriatric population, comorbid pathology
and poly-pharmacy increase the chance of morbidity and mortality. Ketamine infusions at a low dose can be a potential treatment if
monitored closely over a course of time. Therefore, ketamine infusions offer a safe and effective alternative option for TRD patients
in psychiatric facilities where close monitoring can occur. Patients on ketamine treatments should be continually monitored for
addiction potential and adverse effects to ketamine infusions, none of which were seen with our current patient. Further research on
this novel therapy will yield greater knowledge of how to best utilize ketamine infusions for the general population and more
specifically for the geriatric subset that encompasses the majority of TRD patients.

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Exploring Ketamine Use in Geriatric Patients Suffering From Treatment-Resistant Depression

Introduction: Ketamine is a glutamate NMDA receptor antagonist and is commonly used as an anesthetic. Low-dose
subanesthetic intravenous ketamine is fairly new and an increasingly popular treatment for treatment-resistant depression
(TRD) in the adult population; however, there is a scarcity of evidence of ketamine’s use among geriatric patients. Previously,
psychotropics and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) have been used in the geriatric TRD population. Ketamine provides a
possible new treatment modality for those patients concerned with ECT-induced cognitive effects and may also allow for use in
patients with significant cardiovascular co-morbidities, who would likely not quality for ECT.
Methods: We provide a literature review on the use of ketamine for TRD in the geriatric population.
Results: Studies and case series have shown the use of ketamine as a monotherapy and augmented therapy with
electroconvulsive therapy in the adult and geriatric population. Literature supports efficacy with monotherapy and questionable
benefit from augmentative therapy. Dosing ranges from 0.2 mg/kg to 0.5 mg/kg, with evidence showing remittance with
ketamine dosing less than 0.5 mg/kg. Some studies have shown cognitive protection as compared to other TRD treatment
modalities, while the majority of studies have not thoroughly analyzed systemic adverse risk profiles including cognitive and
cardiovascular effects.

Conclusions: There is evidence in the literature for the use of intravenous ketamine in the TRD geriatric population. Larger
randomized control trials are needed to provided guidance regarding dosing, cognitive and systemic effects, and treatment
response.

USe of Ketamine in agitated delirium in the ELderly:

Treatment of Behavior Disturbances with Ketamine in a Patient Diagnosed with Major Neurocognitive Disorder

Ketamine has been shown to be beneficial for some
depressed patients, but it is not known whether it could
be beneficial for agitated demented patients who are
not depressed.

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Augmentation of response and remission to serial intravenous ketamine in TRD

Background: Ketamine has been showing high efficacy and rapid antidepressant effect. However, studies of ketamine infusion wash subjects out from prior antidepressants, which may be impractical in routine practice. In this study, we determined antidepressant response and remission to six consecutive ketamine infusions while maintaining stable doses of antidepressant regimen. We also examined thetrajectory of response and remission, and the time to relapse among responders.

Methods: TRD subjects had at least 2-month period of stable dose of antidepressants. Subjects completed
six IV infusions of 0.5 mg/kg ketamine over 40 min on a Monday–Wednesday–Friday schedule during a
12-day period participants meeting response criteria were monitored for relapse for 4 weeks

.
Results: Fourteen subjects were enrolled. Out of twelve subjects who completed all six infusions, eleven(91.6%) achieved response criterion while eight (66.6%) remitted. After the first infusion, only three andone out of twelve subjects responded and remitted, respectively. Four achieved response and sixremitted after 3 or more infusions. Five out of eleven subjects remain in response status throughout the 4weeks of follow-up. The mean time for six subjects who relapsed was 16 days.Limitations: Small sample and lack of a placebo group limits the interpretation of efficacy.

Conclusions: Safety and efficacy of repeated ketamine infusions were attained without medication-free state in patients with TRD. Repeated infusions achieved superior antidepressant outcomes as compared to a single infusion with different trajectories of response and remission. Future studies are needed to elucidate neural circuits involved in treatment response to ketamine.

 

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Why Treat Depression besides feeling better? It is associated with increased risk of DEATH:

Anxiety, Depression Linked With Higher Cardiovascular Risk

Adults with mood disorders like anxiety and depression may be more likely to have a heart attack or stroke than people without mental illness, a new study suggests.

Researchers enrolled 221,677 people age 45 and older without any history of heart attack or stroke and tracked them for an average of nearly five years.

More than 90% of participants were ages 45 to 79. In this age group, compared to men without mental health issues at the start, men with moderate psychological distress were 28% more likely to have a heart attack during the study and 20% more likely to have a stroke. Men in this age group with high levels of distress were 60% more likely to have a heart attack and 44% more likely to have a stroke.

Women ages 45 to 79 with moderate psychological problems were 12% more likely to have a heart attack and 28% more likely to have a stroke than women without any mental distress. Women with high psychological distress were 24% more likely to have a heart attack and 68% more likely to have a stroke.

“The stronger association between psychological distress and heart attack in men compared to women could be due to women being more likely than men to seek primary care for mental and physical health problems, thus partly negating the possible physical effects of mental health problems,” said lead study author Caroline Jackson of the University of Edinburgh in the U.K.

“Alternatively, it could reflect the known hormonal protection against heart disease in women since the study population included a large number of younger women,” Jackson said by email. “We did however find a strong association between psychological distress and stroke in women, perhaps suggesting different mechanisms exist between psychological distress and different types of cardiovascular disease in women.”

Overall, the study participants suffered 4,573 heart attacks and 2,421 strokes.

The study wasn’t designed to prove whether or how depression or anxiety might directly cause heart attacks or strokes, researchers note in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality Outcomes.

Another limitation is that researchers assessed psychological factors at a single point in time, making it impossible to know if worsening cardiovascular health contributed to mood disorders or if mental illness caused heart problems.

However, it’s possible that lifestyle factors like poor eating and exercise habits, smoking, or inactivity might independently influence both the risk of mental health problems and heart issues, the study authors note.

“It is also possible that symptoms of depression or anxiety directly affect the body’s physiology through mechanisms such as hormonal pathways, inflammatory processes in arteries and increased risk of blood clotting,” Jackson said. “It is vital that further research seeks to identify the underlying mechanisms so that we can better understand the link between mental health and subsequent physical health and inform intervention strategies.”

Researchers assessed psychological distress using a standard set of questions designed to reveal symptoms of mood disorders. The questions asked, for example, how often people felt tired for no reason, how often they felt restless or fidgety, and how frequently they felt so sad that nothing could cheer them up.

Overall, about 16% of the study participants had moderate psychological distress and roughly 7% had high or very high levels of mental distress.

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/2PfAJjd    Psychological Distress and Risk of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke in the 45 and Up Study

Psychological Distress and Risk of MI and stroke in the 45 and up study

 

Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes 2018.

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Psychological distress, physical illness, and risk of coronary heart disease 2005

depressed-patients-likely-experience-mi-stroke

 

Resistance Training Reduces Depressive Symptoms

Weightlifting and muscle training significantly reduced depressive symptoms among adults regardless of their age and health status, the amount of training, and whether they grew stronger, researchers found in a meta-analysis.

The study, published online in JAMA Psychiatry, spanned 33 randomized clinical trials with more than 1800 participants.

The best improvement appeared to be in participants with mild or moderate depression, suggesting resistance training could be an alternative or add-on treatment option.

Trivia: How Much Exercise Is Needed to Prevent Depression?

“For general feelings of depression and the beginning phases of major depression, antidepressants and medications may not be very effective. There also is a shift toward finding options that do not require someone to start a drug regimen they may be on for the rest of their lives,” said researcher Jacob Meyer, PhD, assistant professor of kinesiology at Iowa State University in Ames.

“Understanding that resistance training appears to have similar benefits to aerobic exercise may help those wading through daunting traditional medication treatment options.”

The meta-analysis did identify smaller reductions in depressive symptoms in randomized clinical trials with blinded allocation or assessment. Better quality trials that compare resistance training with other proven treatments for depression are needed, researchers advised.

—Jolynn Tumolo

References

Gordon BR, McDowell CP, Hallgren M, Meyer JD, Lyons M, Herring MP. Association of efficacy of resistance exercise training with depressive symptoms. JAMA Psychiatry. 2018 May 9;[Epub ahead of print].

Motivation to move may start with being mindful [press release]. Ames, Iowa: Iowa State University; May 14, 2018.

Resistance exercise training may reduce symptoms of depression. Psychiatric News Alert. May 15, 2018.

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Neurologic Changes and Depression

KEY POINTS
 The assessment of late-life depression with comorbid cognitive impairment can be challenging and requires a clear clinical history and a thorough medical and cognitive assessment.

 There are several neuropsychological changes associated with late-life depression, ranging from subjective cognitive complaints to mild cognitive impairment to dementia.

 Changes on neuroimaging and in several biomarkers (eg, apolipoprotein E e4 allele, beta amyloid, tau, neurotrophins, and so forth) have been associated with late-life depression.

 Multiple psychotherapeutic techniques have been found effective in the treatment of late life depression as well as holistic/nontraditional, pharmacologic, and brain-stimulation
approaches.

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Why Does Ketamine Work?

Ketamine and Ketamine Metabolite Pharmacology Insights into Therapeutic Mechanisms.

Abstract

Ketamine, a racemic mixture consisting of (S)- and (R)-ketamine, has been in clinical use since 1970. Although best characterized for its dissociative anesthetic properties, ketamine also exerts analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antidepressant actions. We provide a comprehensive review of these therapeutic uses, emphasizing drug dose, route of administration, and the time course of these effects. Dissociative, psychotomimetic, cognitive, and peripheral side effects associated with short-term or prolonged exposure, as well as recreational ketamine use, are also discussed. We further describe ketamine’s pharmacokinetics, including its rapid and extensive metabolism to norketamine, dehydronorketamine, hydroxyketamine, and hydroxynorketamine (HNK) metabolites. Whereas the anesthetic and analgesic properties of ketamine are generally attributed to direct ketamine-induced inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, other putative lower-affinity pharmacological targets of ketamine include, but are not limited to, γ-amynobutyric acid (GABA), dopamine, serotonin, sigma, opioid, and cholinergic receptors, as well as voltage-gated sodium and hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. We examine the evidence supporting the relevance of these targets of ketamine and its metabolites to the clinical effects of the drug. Ketamine metabolites may have broader clinical relevance than was previously considered, given that HNK metabolites have antidepressant efficacy in preclinical studies. Overall, pharmacological target deconvolution of ketamine and its metabolites will provide insight critical to the development of new pharmacotherapies that possess the desirable clinical effects of ketamine, but limit undesirable side effects.

Mechanisms of ketamine action as an antidepressant.

Ketamine administration during a critical period after forced ethanol abstinence inhibits the development of time-dependent affective disturbances.

Article Link::

Ketamine administration during a critical period after forced ethanol abstinence inhibits the development of time-dependent affective disturbances

We find
that ketamine prevents the development of affective disturbances
when administered at the onset of forced abstinence, and not
shortly thereafter (2–6 days).Studies suggest that the GluN2B subunit of the N- methyl- Daspartate
(NMDA) receptor participates in regulating affect and in
the antidepressant actions of ketamine [9, 14, 16]. Chronic ethanol
administration and early withdrawal increase expression of
GluN2B in several brain areas, particularly within the central
nucleus of the amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis
(BNST) [17], both of which are heavily involved in regulating affect
[18–21]. Previously, we found that knockdown of GluN2B-within
the BNST produces antidepressant-like actions similar to ketamine
[22] and that GluN2B is necessary for long-term potentiation (LTP) within the BNST [23]. Furthermore, we have previously shown that
non-contingent chronic intermittent ethanol enhances LTP within
the BNST which is dependent on the GluN2B subunit [23].
However, no studies have looked at LTP within the BNST during
withdrawal after contingent 2-bottle choice ethanol drinking. Here
we show that withdrawal from 2BC ethanol drinking decreases the
early component of LTP within the BNST. Further, administration
of ketamine at the onset of forced abstinence, but not shortly
thereafter (2–6 days) facilitated later LTP induction.

Ketamine administered at the onset of
abstinence, but not 6 days later rescued the STP deficit and overall increased the capacity for plasticity within the BNST. Our results suggest, for the first time to our knowledge, that ketamine may need to be administered at a specific time point during abstinence in order to effectively treat and manage alcohol use dependent affective disturbances. These data thus suggest a “critical period” during which ketamine is effective in preventing the development of alcohol abstinence induced affective
disturbances.

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Ketamine and MAG Lipase Inhibitor-Dependent Reversal of Evolving Depressive-Like Behavior During Forced Abstinence From Alcohol Drinking

Introduction: Ketamine has emerged as a safe and effective treatment option for treatment refractory depression (TRD) and
suicidal ideation. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a well established treatment for refractory depression, but this treatment is often deferred or terminated before response due tolerability or medical concerns.
Methods: We present a case series of TRD patients who were unable to receive ECT and offered intravenous ketamine at a dose
of 0.5 mg/kg infused over the course of forty minutes for up 3 treatment sessions within two weeks. Most of these patients
were hospitalized older patients with sufficient medical conditions that increased ECT risks.

Results: Ketamine appears to be a safe and effective alternative for these patients, leading to resolution of suicidality, adherence
to antidepressant treatment, and prompt hospital discharge.

Conclusions: In conclusion, for TRD patients unable to undergo ECT, availability of intravenous ketamine, as an adjunct to
an ECT service, can not only avert the prospect of a prolonged and costly course of hospitalization, but also quickly improve
patients’ quality of life.

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Why magnesium is important in treating depression:

Magnesium for treatment-resistant depression A review and hypothesis

Sixty percent of cases of clinical depression are considered to be treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Magnesium-deficiency causes N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) coupled calcium channels to be biased towards opening, causing neuronal injury and neurological dysfunction, which may appear to humans as major depression. Oral administration of magnesium to animals led to anti-depressant-like effects that were comparable to those of strong anti-depressant drugs. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) magnesium has been found low in treatment-resistant suicidal depression and in patients that have attempted suicide. Brain magnesium has been found low in TRD using phosphorous nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, an accurate means for measuring brain magnesium. Blood and CSF magnesium do not appear well correlated with major depression. Although the first report of magnesium treatment for agitated depression was published in 1921 showing success in 220 out of 250 cases, and there are modern case reports showing rapid terminating of TRD, only a few modern clinical trials were found. A 2008 randomized clinical trial showed that magnesium was as effective as the tricyclic anti-depressant imipramine in treating depression in diabetics and without any of the side effects of imipramine. Intravenous and oral magnesium in specific protocols have been reported to rapidly terminate TRD safely and without side effects. Magnesium has been largely removed from processed foods, potentially harming the brain. Calcium, glutamate and aspartate are common food additives that may worsen affective disorders. We hypothesize that – when taken together – there is more than sufficient evidence to implicate inadequate dietary magnesium as the main cause of TRD, and that physicians should prescribe magnesium for TRD. Since inadequate brain magnesium appears to reduce serotonin levels, and since anti-depressants have been shown to have the action of raising brain magnesium, we further hypothesize that magnesium treatment will be found beneficial for nearly all depressives, not only TRD.

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Does oral administration of ketamine accelerate response to treatment in MDD

Conclusion:

Altogether, our results suggest that oral ketamine may be considered as suitable adjuvant to sertraline
in relieving depressive symptoms.

Patients received sertraline (150 mg a day). As an adjuvant, they
received either 50 mg/day ketamine or placebo. Formulation of ketamine capsules used in this study is delineated elsewhere. Different doses of oral ketamine have been used in previous studies; a number of studies have used a fixed dose 0.5 mg/kg or 150 mg/day (Irwin et al., 2013; Jafarinia et al., 2016) whereas others titrated the drug in a rangefrom 0.5 mg/kg to 0.7 mg/kg or 25–300 mg/day (Al Shirawi et al., 2017; Hartberg et al., 2017). The frequency of administration also varies from once daily usage to three times a day (Irwin et al., 2013;
Jafarinia et al., 2016). For IV administration, previous trials recommendan injection once every two or three days (Andrade, 2017).
Here, we used ketamine as an adjuvant and thus a fixed low dose was chosen to minimize adverse effects. Sertraline was initiated at 25 mg/day and increased by 25 mg every three days. The maximum dose reached 150 mg. Ketamine prescription started with initial dose ofsertraline and was prescribed at 25 mg twice daily. During the course of the trial, patients were not allowed to participate in psychotherapeutic sessions or receive any other medication, such as other antidepressants, anxiolytics or hypnotics. They were followed for six weeks and were asked to inform their therapist in case they experienced any adverse effects. Vital signs were recorded and physical examination was performed at the screening session and at each of the post-baseline visits. Upon high clinical suspicion for cardiovascular disease, electrocardiogram monitoring was performed and positive findings were excluded.

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Reasons to treat depression rapidly – Depression causes rapid aging> Consider using a rapid – acting antidepressant!

Depression ‘makes us biologically older’  BBC Article

Major depressive disorder and accelerated cellular aging

Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) have an increased onset risk of aging-related somatic diseases such as heart disease,
diabetes, obesity and cancer. This suggests mechanisms of accelerated biological aging among the depressed, which can be
indicated by a shorter length of telomeres. We examine whether MDD is associated with accelerated biological aging, and whether
depression characteristics such as severity, duration, and psychoactive medication do further impact on biological aging. Data are
from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety, including 1095 current MDD patients, 802 remitted MDD patients and 510
control subjects. Telomere length (TL) was assessed as the telomere sequence copy number (T) compared to a single-copy gene
copy number (S) using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. This resulted in a T/S ratio and was converted to base pairs (bp).
MDD diagnosis and MDD characteristics were determined by self-report questionnaires and structured psychiatric interviews.
Compared with control subjects (mean bp = 5541), sociodemographic-adjusted TL was shorter among remitted MDD patients
(mean bp = 5459; P = 0.014) and current MDD patients (mean bp = 5461; P = 0.012). Adjustment for health and lifestyle variables did
not reduce the associations. Within the current MDD patients, separate analyses showed that both higher depression severity
(P<0.01) and longer symptom duration in the past 4 years (P = 0.01) were associated with shorter TL. Our results demonstrate that
depressed patients show accelerated cellular aging according to a ‘dose–response’ gradient: those with the most severe and
chronic MDD showed the shortest TL. We also confirmed the imprint of past exposure to depression, as those with remitted MDD
had shorter TL than controls

In this large cohort study we demonstrated that currently
depressed persons had shorter TL than never-depressed controls.
Based on an estimated mean telomere shortening rate of 14–20
bp per year as found in this and other studies,20,23,26 the
differences observed indicate 4–6 years of accelerated aging for
the current MDD sample as compared to controls. We also showed
evidence for the imprint of past exposure to depression since
those with remitted MDD also had shorter TL than control
subjects. These observed associations remained significant after
controlling for lifestyle and somatic health variables, suggesting that the shortened telomeres were not simply due to unhealthylifestyle or poorer somatic health among depressed persons.
Finally, the association between MDD and TL showed a ‘dose–
response’ gradient, since the most severely and chronically
depressed patients had the shortest telomeres.

MDD is thus associated with shortened TL, which resembles
accelerated biological aging. The disorder has previously also been
associated with dysregulations of the hypothalamus–pituitary–
adrenal (HPA) axis,43,45 the immune system,46,47 the autonomic
nervous system (ANS)48,49 and increased oxidative stress.50
Shortened telomeres, in turn, are suggested to be a consequence
or a concomitant of these dysregulated biological stress systems.
In line with this, several in vitro and in vivo studies found increased
cortisol,51 oxidative stress52 and pro-inflammatory cytokines53
to be associated with shorter TL. Dysregulations of these stress systems could contribute to telomere shortening in MDD patients.9,12
However, the exact biological mechanisms that mediate the relation
between depression and telomere shortening, as well as the
direction of the link, remain to be further explored.

Oxidative stress shortens telomeres

Elevated DNA Oxidation and DNA Repair Enzyme Expression in Brain White Matter in Major Depressive Disorder.

The Role of Oxidative Stress in Depressive Disorders

Abstract:

Studies of the World Health Organization suggest that in the year 2020, depressive disorder will be the illness with the highest
burden of disease. Especially unipolar depression is the psychiatric disorder with the highest prevalence and incidence, it is cost-intensive and has a relatively high morbidity. Lately, the biological process involved in the aetiology of depression has been the focus of research.
Since its emergence, the monoamine hypothesis has been adjusted and extended considerably. An increasing body of evidence points to
alterations not only in brain function, but also in neuronal plasticity. The clinical presentations demonstrate these dysfunctions by accompanying cognitive symptoms such as problems with memory and concentration. Modern imaging techniques show volume reduction of the hippocampus and the frontal cortex. These findings are in line with post-mortem studies of patients with depressive disorder and they point to a significant decrease of neuronal and glial cells in cortico-limbic regions which can be seen as a consequence of alterations in
neuronal plasticity in this disorder. This could be triggered by an increase of free radicals which in turn eventually leads to cell death and consequently atrophy of vulnerable neuronal and glial cell population in these regions. Therefore, research on increased oxidative stress in unipolar depressive disorder, mediated by elevated concentrations of free radicals, has been undertaken. This review gives a comprehensive overview over the current literature discussing the involvement of oxidative stress and free radicals in depression.

Membrane damage in blood of patients with depression has
been shown by elevated of omega 3- fatty-acids [45] and by increased
lipid peroxidation products in patients with DD [42, 45,
[46, 47]. Furthermore, DNA-strand brakes have been reported in
the blood of these patients [48]. DD has been linked to increased
serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a breakdown product of
oxidized apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins, and thus a
marker of the rate of peroxide breakdown [49, 50].

In patients with DD (Depressive Disorders), elevated levels of MDA adversely affect
the efficiency of visual-spatial and auditory-verbal working memory,
short-term declarative memory and delayed recall declarative
memory [51]. Higher concentration of plasma MDA in patients
with recurrent depression is associated with the severity of depressive
symptoms, both at the beginning of antidepressant pharmacotherapy,
and after 8 weeks of treatment. Statistically significant
differences were found in the intensity of depressive symptoms,
measured on therapy onset versus the examination results after
8 weeks of treatment [51]. Although this is used as a marker of lipid peroxidation, it is considered to be less stable than 8-iso-PGF2a, and more susceptible to confounding factors such as antioxidants from diet [52]. Therefore, the best way to investigate oxidative disruptions to lipids in humans is via assessing levels of F2-
isoprostanes [52-54]. These are stable compounds produced in the
process of lipid peroxidation [52, 54]. 8-iso-PGF2a are specific F2-
isoprostane molecules produced during the peroxidation of arachnidonic acid. However, the mean serum level of 8-iso-PGF2a was shown to be significantly higher in a group of patients with DD,
controlling for lifestyle variables such as body mass index, alcohol
consumption, and physical activity [55, 56]. Cerebral membrane
abnormalities and altered membrane phospholipids have been suggested by an increased choline-containing compound seen in the
putamen of patients with DD [57] which has been interpreted as a
result of increased oxidative stress in patients with DD.

A Meta-Analysis of Oxidative Stress Markers in Depression

Results
115 articles met the inclusion criteria. Lower TAC was noted in acute episodes (AEs) of depressed patients (p<0.05). Antioxidants, including serum paraoxonase, uric acid, albumin,
high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and zinc levels were lower than controls (p<0.05); the serum uric acid, albumin and vitamin C levels were increased after antidepressant therapy
(p<0.05). Oxidative damage products, including red blood cell (RBC) malondialdehyde (MDA), serum MDA and 8-F2-isoprostanes levels were higher than controls (p<0.05). After
antidepressant medication, RBC and serum MDA levels were decreased (p<0.05). Moreover, serum peroxide in free radicals levels were higher than controls (p<0.05). There were
no difference

Conclusion
This meta-analysis supports the facts that the serum TAC, paraoxonase and antioxidant levels are lower, and the serum free radical and oxidative damage product levels are higher
than controls in depressed patients. Meanwhile, the antioxidant levels are increased and the oxidative damage product levels are decreased after antidepressant medication. The
pathophysiological relationships between oxidative stress and depression, and the potential benefits of antioxidant supplementation deserve further research.

Some studies have demonstrated that depressed patients’ oxidative product levels in their peripheral blood [3, 4], red blood cells (RBC) [4], mononuclear cells [5], urine [6], cerebrospinal
fluid [7] and postmortem brains [8] were abnormal. Antioxidant system disturbance in peripheral blood has also been reported [9]. Autoimmune responses against neoepitopes
induced by oxidative damage of fatty acid and protein membranes have been reported [10, 11].
Lower glutathione (GSH) levels [12] and a negative relationship between anhedonia severity
and occipital GSH levels [13] were found through magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS).

Oxidative stress is defined as a persistent imbalance between oxidation and anti-oxidation, which leads to the damage of cellular macromolecules [14, 15]. The free radicals consist of reactive
oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). The main ROS includes superoxide anion, hydroxy radical and hydrogen peroxide, and the RNS consists of nitric oxide
(NO), nitrogen dioxide and peroxynitrite. Nitrite is often used as a marker of NO activity. Interestingly, the brain appears to be more susceptible to the ROS/RNS because of the high
content of unsaturated fatty acids, high oxygen consumption per unit weight, high content of key ingredients of lipid peroxidation (LP) and scarcity of antioxidant defence systems [16].
The oxidative products include products of oxidative damage of LP, protein and DNA in depression. As a product of LP, abnormal malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in depression have
been reported [17]. 8-F2-isoprostane (8-iso-PGF2α) is another product of LP [18] that is considered
to be a marker of LP because of its chemical stability [19]. The protein carbonyl (PC), 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo) are
the markers of protein, DNA and RNA oxidative damage, respectively [3, 20, 21]. The oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules changes the structure of original epitopes, which leads to the generation of new epitopes modified (neoepitopes). The antibodies against oxidative neoepitopes
in depression have been found [10, 11, 22–24]. On the other hand, the antioxidant defence systems can be divided into enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. The nonenzymatic
antioxidants include vitamins C and E, albumin, uric acid, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), GSH, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), ceruloplasmin, zinc, selenium, and so on.
The enzymatic antioxidants include superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), paraoxonase 1 (PON1), and so on.

Discussion
The present findings support oxidative stress may be disordered in depressed patients, which is demonstrated by abnormal oxidative stress marker levels. In this meta-analysis, at first we
found in depressed patients: 1) the serum TAC, PON, uric acid, albumin, HDL-C and zinc levels were lower than controls; 2) the serum peroxide, MDA, 8-iso-PGF2α and RBC MDA levels
were higher than controls. To explore the effect of the antidepressant therapy to oxidative stress
markers, we reviewed the studies which had changes. And it came to the conclusions: 1) the serum uric acid, albumin, and vitamin C levels were increased; 2) the serum nitrite, RBC and
serum MDA levels were decreased.

The serum antioxidant levels are significantly lower in depression in our study and previous
reports, including PON, albumin, zinc, uric acid HDL-C, CoQ10 [146] and GSH [4, 38].
Meanwhile, the oxidative damage product levels are significantly higher. The body couldn’t
scavenge the excess free radicals (peroxide), leading to damages of main parts of cellular macromolecules
such as fatty acids, protein, DNA, RNA and mitochondria. The longitudinal antidepressant
therapy can reverse these abnormal oxidative stress parameters. It has proved
these phenomena occur in depression, such as increased levels of MDA, 8-iso-PGF2α, 8-oxoGuo
and 8-OHdG [3, 21]. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of
depression. Some genes may be a potential factor. Lawlor et al (2007) reported the R allele of
PON1Q192R was associated with depression [147]. In addition, poor appetite, psychological
stressors, obesity, metabolic syndrome, sleep disorders, cigarette smoking and unhealthy lifestyle
may also contribute to it [148]. Furthermore, oxidative stress activates the immuneinflammatory
pathways [148]. But some studies supported decrease in albumin, zinc and
HDL-C levels was probably related to increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as
interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-6) [59, 70–72, 117] during an acute phase response, which illustrated the activated immune-inflammatory pathways also activates the oxidative stress. These two mechanisms influence each other. On the other hand, the oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules changes the structure of original epitopes, which leads to generation of newepitopes modified (neoepitopes). Oxidative neoepitopes reported up to now include the conjugated oleic and azelaic acid, MDA, phosphatidyl inositol (Pi), NO-modified adducts and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) [11, 22–24]. Maes et al reported the levels of serum IgG antibody against the oxLDL and IgM antibodies against the conjugated oleic and azelaic acid, MDA, Pi and NO-modified adducts were increased in depression [11, 22–24]. Depleted antioxidant defence in depression suggests that antioxidant supplements may be useful in clinical management. Preliminary evidence has indicated that patients treated with CoQ10 showed improvement in depressive symptoms and decrease in hippocampal oxidative DNA damage [149]. In our analyses, vitamin C and E levels did not differ between depressed patients and controls, but many studies have reported that vitamin C and E supplements could improve depressive moods [150, 151].

Malondialdehyde plasma concentration correlates with declarative and working memory in patients with recurrent depressive disorder

Abstract

Oxidative stress has been implicated in the cognitive decline, especially in memory impairment. The purpose of this study was to determine the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) in patients with recurrent depressive disorders (rDD) and to define relationship between plasma levels of MDA and the cognitive performance. The study comprised 46 patients meeting criteria for rDD. Cognitive function assessment was based on: The Trail Making Test , The Stroop Test, Verbal Fluency Test and Auditory-Verbal Learning Test. The severity of depression symptoms was assessed using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). Statistically significant differences were found in the intensity of depression symptoms, measured by the HDRS on therapy onset versus the examination results after 8 weeks of treatment (P < 0.001). Considering the 8-week pharmacotherapy period, rDD patients presented better outcomes in cognitive function tests. There was no statistically significant correlation between plasma MDA levels, and the age, disease duration, number of previous depressive episodes and the results in HDRS applied on admission and on discharge. Elevated levels of MDA adversely affected the efficiency of visual-spatial and auditory-verbal working memory, short-term declarative memory and the delayed recall declarative memory. 1. Higher concentration of plasma MDA in rDD patients is associated with the severity of depressive symptoms, both at the beginning of antidepressants pharmacotherapy, and after 8 weeks of its duration. 2. Elevated levels of plasma MDA are related to the impairment of visual-spatial and auditory-verbal working memory and short-term and delayed declarative memory.

Antioxidant /Antidepressant-like Effect of Ascorbic acid (Vitamine
C) and Fluoxetine
Another study investigated the influence of ascorbic acid
(which is an antioxidant with antidepressant-like effects in animals)
on both depressive-like behaviour induced by a chronic unpredictable
stress (CUS) paradigm and on serum markers of oxidative
stress and in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice [120]. The
CUS-model is an animal model for induced depression-like behaviour
in animals. Depressive-like behaviour induced by CUS was
accompanied by significantly increased lipid peroxidation (cerebral
cortex and hippocampus), decreased catalase (CAT) (cerebral cortex
and hippocampus) and glutathione reductase (GR) (hippocampus)
activities and reduced levels of glutathione (cerebral cortex).
Repeated ascorbic acid as well as fluoxetine administration significantly
reversed CUS-induced depressive-like behaviour as well as
oxidative damage. No alterations were observed in locomotor activity
and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in the same sample.
These findings pointed to a rapid and robust effect of ascorbic acid
in reversing behavioural and biochemical alterations induced in an
animal model [120].  Ascorbic acid treatment, similarly to fluoxetine, reverses depressive-like behavior and brain oxidative damage induced by chronic unpredictable stress.

 

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Ketamine and Psychedelic Drugs Change Structure of Neurons

ummary: A new study reveals psychedelics increase dendrites, dendritic spines and synapses, while ketamine may promote neuroplasticity. The findings could help develop new treatments for anxiety, depression and other related disorders.

Source: UC Davis.

A team of scientists at the University of California, Davis is exploring how hallucinogenic drugs impact the structure and function of neurons — research that could lead to new treatments for depression, anxiety, and related disorders. In a paper published on June 12 in the journal Cell Reports, they demonstrate that a wide range of psychedelic drugs, including well-known compounds such as LSD and MDMA, increase the number of neuronal branches (dendrites), the density of small protrusions on these branches (dendritic spines), and the number of connections between neurons (synapses). These structural changes suggest that psychedelics are capable of repairing the circuits that are malfunctioning in mood and anxiety disorders.

“People have long assumed that psychedelics are capable of altering neuronal structure, but this is the first study that clearly and unambiguously supports that hypothesis. What is really exciting is that psychedelics seem to mirror the effects produced by ketamine,” said David Olson, assistant professor in the Departments of Chemistry and of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, who leads the research team.

Ketamine, an anesthetic, has been receiving a lot of attention lately because it produces rapid antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant populations, leading the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to fast-track clinical trials of two antidepressant drugs based on ketamine. The antidepressant properties of ketamine may stem from its tendency to promote neural plasticity — the ability of neurons to rewire their connections.

“The rapid effects of ketamine on mood and plasticity are truly astounding. The big question we were trying to answer was whether or not other compounds are capable of doing what ketamine does,” Olson said.

Psychedelics show similar effects to ketamine

Olson’s group has demonstrated that psychedelics mimic the effects of ketamine on neurons grown in a dish, and that these results extend to structural and electrical properties of neurons in animals. Rats treated with a single dose of DMT — a psychedelic compound found in the Amazonian herbal tea known as ayahuasca — showed an increase in the number of dendritic spines, similar to that seen with ketamine treatment. DMT itself is very short-lived in the rat: Most of the drug is eliminated within an hour. But the “rewiring” effects on the brain could be seen 24 hours later, demonstrating that these effects last for some time.

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Fairfax | NOVA Ketamine IV Ketamine for depression | Fairfax, Va 22306 | 703-844-0184

Ketamine and Psychedelic Drugs Change Structure of Neurons

Summary: A new study reveals psychedelics increase dendrites, dendritic spines and synapses, while ketamine may promote neuroplasticity. The findings could help develop new treatments for anxiety, depression and other related disorders.

Source: UC Davis.

A team of scientists at the University of California, Davis is exploring how hallucinogenic drugs impact the structure and function of neurons — research that could lead to new treatments for depression, anxiety, and related disorders. In a paper published on June 12 in the journal Cell Reports, they demonstrate that a wide range of psychedelic drugs, including well-known compounds such as LSD and MDMA, increase the number of neuronal branches (dendrites), the density of small protrusions on these branches (dendritic spines), and the number of connections between neurons (synapses). These structural changes suggest that psychedelics are capable of repairing the circuits that are malfunctioning in mood and anxiety disorders.

“People have long assumed that psychedelics are capable of altering neuronal structure, but this is the first study that clearly and unambiguously supports that hypothesis. What is really exciting is that psychedelics seem to mirror the effects produced by ketamine,” said David Olson, assistant professor in the Departments of Chemistry and of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, who leads the research team.

Ketamine, an anesthetic, has been receiving a lot of attention lately because it produces rapid antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant populations, leading the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to fast-track clinical trials of two antidepressant drugs based on ketamine. The antidepressant properties of ketamine may stem from its tendency to promote neural plasticity — the ability of neurons to rewire their connections.

“The rapid effects of ketamine on mood and plasticity are truly astounding. The big question we were trying to answer was whether or not other compounds are capable of doing what ketamine does,” Olson said.

Psychedelics show similar effects to ketamine

Olson’s group has demonstrated that psychedelics mimic the effects of ketamine on neurons grown in a dish, and that these results extend to structural and electrical properties of neurons in animals. Rats treated with a single dose of DMT — a psychedelic compound found in the Amazonian herbal tea known as ayahuasca — showed an increase in the number of dendritic spines, similar to that seen with ketamine treatment. DMT itself is very short-lived in the rat: Most of the drug is eliminated within an hour. But the “rewiring” effects on the brain could be seen 24 hours later, demonstrating that these effects last for some time.

image shows neurons under psychedelics and ketamine

Psychedelic drugs such as LSD and ayahuasca change the structure of nerve cells, causing them to sprout more branches and spines, UC Davis researchers have found. This could help in “rewiring” the brain to treat depression and other disorders. In this false-colored image, the rainbow-colored cell was treated with LSD compared to a control cell in blue. NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Calvin and Joanne Ly.

Behavioral studies also hint at the similarities between psychedelics and ketamine. In another recent paper published in ACS Chemical Neuroscience, Olson’s group showed that DMT treatment enabled rats to overcome a “fear response” to the memory of a mild electric shock. This test is considered to be a model of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and interestingly, ketamine produces the same effect. Recent clinical trials have shown that like ketamine, DMT-containing ayahuasca might have fast-acting effects in people with recurrent depression, Olson said.

These discoveries potentially open doors for the development of novel drugs to treat mood and anxiety disorders, Olson said. His team has proposed the term “psychoplastogen” to describe this new class of “plasticity-promoting” compounds.

“Ketamine is no longer our only option. Our work demonstrates that there are a number of distinct chemical scaffolds capable of promoting plasticity like ketamine, providing additional opportunities for medicinal chemists to develop safer and more effective alternatives,” Olson said.

 

Psychedelic drugs, ketamine change structure of neurons

Psychedelic drugs, ketamine change structure of neurons

Psychedelics as Possible Treatments for Depression and PTSD

A team of scientists at the University of California, Davis, is exploring how hallucinogenic drugs impact the structure and function of neurons — research that could lead to new treatments for depression, anxiety and related disorders.

In a paper published on June 12 in the journal Cell Reports, they demonstrate that a wide range of psychedelic drugs, including well-known compounds such as LSD and MDMA, increase the number of neuronal branches (dendrites), the density of small protrusions on these branches (dendritic spines) and the number of connections between neurons (synapses). These structural changes could suggest that psychedelics are capable of repairing the circuits that are malfunctioning in mood and anxiety disorders.

“People have long assumed that psychedelics are capable of altering neuronal structure, but this is the first study that clearly and unambiguously supports that hypothesis. What is really exciting is that psychedelics seem to mirror the effects produced by ketamine,” said David Olson, assistant professor in the departments of Chemistry and of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, who leads the research team.

Ketamine, an anesthetic, has been receiving a lot of attention lately because it produces rapid antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant populations, leading the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to fast-track clinical trials of two antidepressant drugs based on ketamine. The antidepressant properties of ketamine may stem from its tendency to promote neural plasticity — the ability of neurons to rewire their connections.

“The rapid effects of ketamine on mood and plasticity are truly astounding. The big question we were trying to answer was whether or not other compounds are capable of doing what ketamine does,” Olson said.

Psychedelics show similar effects to ketamine

Olson’s group has demonstrated that psychedelics mimic the effects of ketamine on neurons grown in a dish, and that these results extend to structural and electrical properties of neurons in animals. Rats treated with a single dose of DMT — a psychedelic compound found in the Amazonian herbal tea known as ayahuasca — showed an increase in the number of dendritic spines, similar to that seen with ketamine treatment. DMT itself is very short-lived in the rat: Most of the drug is eliminated within an hour. But the “rewiring” effects on the brain could be seen 24 hours later, demonstrating that these effects last for some time.

Behavioral studies also hint at the similarities between psychedelics and ketamine. In another recent paper published in ACS Chemical Neuroscience, Olson’s group showed that DMT treatment enabled rats to overcome a “fear response” to the memory of a mild electric shock. This test is considered to be a model of post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, and interestingly, ketamine produces the same effect. Recent clinical trials have shown that like ketamine, DMT-containing ayahuasca might have fast-acting effects in people with recurrent depression, Olson said.

These discoveries potentially open doors for the development of novel drugs to treat mood and anxiety disorders, Olson said. His team has proposed the term “psychoplastogen” to describe this new class of “plasticity-promoting” compounds.

“Ketamine is no longer our only option. Our work demonstrates that there are a number of distinct chemical scaffolds capable of promoting plasticity like ketamine, providing additional opportunities for medicinal chemists to develop safer and more effective alternatives,” Olson said.

Additional co-authors on the Cell Reports “Psychedelics Promote Structural and Functional Neural Plasticity.” study are Calvin Ly, Alexandra Greb, Sina Soltanzadeh Zarandi, Lindsay Cameron, Jonathon Wong, Eden Barragan, Paige Wilson, Michael Paddy, Kassandra Ori-McKinney, Kyle Burbach, Megan Dennis, Alexander Sood, Whitney Duim, Kimberley McAllister and John Gray.

Olson and Cameron were co-authors on the ACS Chemical Neuroscience paper along with Charlie Benson and Lee Dunlap.

The work was partly supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health.

Psychedelics Promote Structural and Functional
Neural Plasticity

Below is the Intro and Discussion for the article:

Psychedelics Promote Structural and Functional neural Plasticity

Authors:

Calvin Ly, Alexandra C. Greb,
Lindsay P. Cameron, …,
Kassandra M. Ori-McKenney,
John A. Gray, David E. Olson
Correspondence
deolson@ucdavis.edu

In Brief
Ly et al. demonstrate that psychedelic
compounds such as LSD, DMT, and DOI
increase dendritic arbor complexity,
promote dendritic spine growth, and
stimulate synapse formation. These
cellular effects are similar to those
produced by the fast-acting
antidepressant ketamine and highlight
the potential of psychedelics for treating
depression and related disorders.

  • Highlights
     Serotonergic psychedelics increase neuritogenesis,
    spinogenesis, and synaptogenesis
  •  Psychedelics promote plasticity via an evolutionarily
    conserved mechanism
  •  TrkB, mTOR, and 5-HT2A signaling underlie psychedelicinduced
    plasticity
  •  Noribogaine, but not ibogaine, is capable of promoting
    structural neural plasticity

SUMMARY
Atrophy of neurons in the prefrontal cortex (PFC)
plays a key role in the pathophysiology of depression
and related disorders. The ability to promote
both structural and functional plasticity in the PFC
has been hypothesized to underlie the fast-acting
antidepressant properties of the dissociative anesthetic
ketamine. Here, we report that, like ketamine,
serotonergic psychedelics are capable of robustly
increasing neuritogenesis and/or spinogenesis both
in vitro and in vivo. These changes in neuronal structure
are accompanied by increased synapse number
and function, as measured by fluorescence microscopy
and electrophysiology. The structural changes
induced by psychedelics appear to result from stimulation
of the TrkB, mTOR, and 5-HT2A signaling
pathways and could possibly explain the clinical
effectiveness of these compounds. Our results underscore
the therapeutic potential of psychedelics
and, importantly, identify several lead scaffolds for
medicinal chemistry efforts focused on developing
plasticity-promoting compounds as safe, effective,
and fast-acting treatments for depression and
related disorders.

INTRODUCTION
Neuropsychiatric diseases, including mood and anxiety disorders,
are some of the leading causes of disability worldwide
and place an enormous economic burden on society (Gustavsson
et al., 2011; Whiteford et al., 2013). Approximately
one-third of patients will not respond to current antidepressant
drugs, and those who do will usually require at least 2–4 weeks
of treatment before they experience any beneficial effects
(Rush et al., 2006). Depression, post-traumatic stress disorder
(PTSD), and addiction share common neural circuitry (Arnsten,
2009; Russo et al., 2009; Peters et al., 2010; Russo and
Nestler, 2013) and have high comorbidity (Kelly and Daley,
2013). A preponderance of evidence from a combination of
human imaging, postmortem studies, and animal models suggests
that atrophy of neurons in the prefrontal cortex (PFC)
plays a key role in the pathophysiology of depression and
related disorders and is precipitated and/or exacerbated by
stress (Arnsten, 2009; Autry and Monteggia, 2012; Christoffel
et al., 2011; Duman and Aghajanian, 2012; Duman et al.,
2016; Izquierdo et al., 2006; Pittenger and Duman, 2008;
Qiao et al., 2016; Russo and Nestler, 2013). These structural
changes, such as the retraction of neurites, loss of dendritic
spines, and elimination of synapses, can potentially be counteracted
by compounds capable of promoting structural and
functional neural plasticity in the PFC (Castre´ n and Antila,
2017; Cramer et al., 2011; Duman, 2002; Hayley and Litteljohn,
2013; Kolb and Muhammad, 2014; Krystal et al., 2009;
Mathew et al., 2008), providing a general solution to treating
all of these related diseases. However, only a relatively small
number of compounds capable of promoting plasticity in the
PFC have been identified so far, each with significant drawbacks
(Castre´ n and Antila, 2017). Of these, the dissociative
anesthetic ketamine has shown the most promise, revitalizing
the field of molecular psychiatry in recent years.
Ketamine has demonstrated remarkable clinical potential as a
fast-acting antidepressant (Berman et al., 2000; Ionescu et al.,
2016; Zarate et al., 2012), even exhibiting efficacy in treatmentresistant
populations (DiazGranados et al., 2010; Murrough
et al., 2013; Zarate et al., 2006). Additionally, it has shown promise
for treating PTSD (Feder et al., 2014) and heroin addiction
(Krupitsky et al., 2002). Animal models suggest that its therapeutic
effects stem from its ability to promote the growth of dendritic
spines, increase the synthesis of synaptic proteins, and
strengthen synaptic responses (Autry et al., 2011; Browne and
Lucki, 2013; Li et al., 2010).

Like ketamine, serotonergic psychedelics and entactogens
have demonstrated rapid and long-lasting antidepressant and
anxiolytic effects in the clinic after a single dose (Bouso et al.,
2008; Carhart-Harris and Goodwin, 2017; Grob et al., 2011;
Mithoefer et al., 2013, 2016; Nichols et al., 2017; Sanches
et al., 2016; Oso´ rio et al., 2015), including in treatment-resistant
populations (Carhart-Harris et al., 2016, 2017; Mithoefer et al.,
2011; Oehen et al., 2013; Rucker et al., 2016). In fact, there
have been numerous clinical trials in the past 30 years examining
the therapeutic effects of these drugs (Dos Santos et al., 2016),
with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) recently
receiving the ‘‘breakthrough therapy’’ designation by the Food
and Drug Administration for treating PTSD. Furthermore, classical
psychedelics and entactogens produce antidepressant
and anxiolytic responses in rodent behavioral tests, such as
the forced swim test (Cameron et al., 2018) and fear extinction
learning (Cameron et al., 2018; Catlow et al., 2013; Young
et al., 2015), paradigms for which ketamine has also been shown
to be effective (Autry et al., 2011; Girgenti et al., 2017; Li et al.,
2010). Despite the promising antidepressant, anxiolytic, and
anti-addictive properties of serotonergic psychedelics, their
therapeutic mechanism of action remains poorly understood,
and concerns about safety have severely limited their clinical
usefulness.
Because of the similarities between classical serotonergic
psychedelics and ketamine in both preclinical models and clinical
studies, we reasoned that their therapeutic effects might
result from a shared ability to promote structural and functional
neural plasticity in cortical neurons. Here, we report that serotonergic
psychedelics and entactogens from a variety of chemical
classes (e.g., amphetamine, tryptamine, and ergoline) display
plasticity-promoting properties comparable to or greater than
ketamine. Like ketamine, these compounds stimulate structural
plasticity by activating the mammalian target of rapamycin
(mTOR). To classify the growing number of compounds capable
of rapidly promoting induced plasticity (Castre´ n and Antila,
2017), we introduce the term ‘‘psychoplastogen,’’ from the
Greek roots psych- (mind), -plast (molded), and -gen (producing).
Our work strengthens the growing body of literature indicating
that psychoplastogens capable of promoting plasticity
in the PFC might have value as fast-acting antidepressants
and anxiolytics with efficacy in treatment-resistant populations
and suggests that it may be possible to use classical psychedelics
as lead structures for identifying safer alternatives.

DISCUSSION
Classical serotonergic psychedelics are known to cause
changes in mood (Griffiths et al., 2006, 2008, 2011) and brain
function (Carhart-Harris et al., 2017) that persist long after the
acute effects of the drugs have subsided. Moreover, several
psychedelics elevate glutamate levels in the cortex (Nichols,
2004, 2016) and increase gene expression in vivo of the neurotrophin
BDNF as well as immediate-early genes associated with
plasticity (Martin et al., 2014; Nichols and Sanders-Bush, 2002;
Vaidya et al., 1997). This indirect evidence has led to the
reasonable hypothesis that psychedelics promote structural
and functional neural plasticity, although this assumption had
never been rigorously tested (Bogenschutz and Pommy,
2012; Vollenweider and Kometer, 2010). The data presented
here provide direct evidence for this hypothesis, demonstrating
that psychedelics cause both structural and functional changes
in cortical neurons.

Prior to this study, two reports suggested
that psychedelics might be able
to produce changes in neuronal structure.
Jones et al. (2009) demonstrated that DOI
was capable of transiently increasing the
size of dendritic spines on cortical neurons,
but no change in spine density was
observed. The second study showed
that DOI promoted neurite extension in a
cell line of neuronal lineage (Marinova
et al., 2017). Both of these reports utilized
DOI, a psychedelic of the amphetamine
class. Here we demonstrate that the ability
to change neuronal structure is not a
unique property of amphetamines like
DOI because psychedelics from the ergoline,
tryptamine, and iboga classes of compounds also promote
structural plasticity. Additionally, D-amphetamine does not increase
the complexity of cortical dendritic arbors in culture,
and therefore, these morphological changes cannot be simply
attributed to an increase in monoamine neurotransmission.
The identification of psychoplastogens belonging to distinct
chemical families is an important aspect of this work because
it suggests that ketamine is not unique in its ability to promote
structural and functional plasticity. In addition to ketamine, the
prototypical psychoplastogen, only a relatively small number of
plasticity-promoting small molecules have been identified previously.
Such compounds include the N-methyl-D-aspartate
(NMDA) receptor ligand GLYX-13 (i.e., rapastinel), the mGlu2/3
antagonist LY341495, the TrkB agonist 7,8-DHF, and the muscarinic
receptor antagonist scopolamine (Lepack et al., 2016; Castello
et al., 2014; Zeng et al., 2012; Voleti et al., 2013). We
observe that hallucinogens from four distinct structural classes
(i.e., tryptamine, amphetamine, ergoline, and iboga) are also
potent psychoplastogens, providing additional lead scaffolds
for medicinal chemistry efforts aimed at identifying neurotherapeutics.
Furthermore, our cellular assays revealed that several
of these compounds were more efficacious (e.g., MDMA) or more potent (e.g., LSD) than ketamine. In fact, the plasticity-promoting
properties of psychedelics and entactogens rivaled that
of BDNF (Figures 3A–3C and S3). The extreme potency of LSD
in particular might be due to slow off kinetics, as recently proposed
following the disclosure of the LSD-bound 5-HT2B crystal
structure (Wacker et al., 2017).
Importantly, the psychoplastogenic effects of psychedelics in
cortical cultures were also observed in vivo using both vertebrate
and invertebrate models, demonstrating that they act through an
evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Furthermore, the concentrations
of psychedelics utilized in our in vitro cell culture assays
were consistent with those reached in the brain following systemic
administration of therapeutic doses in rodents (Yang
et al., 2018; Cohen and Vogel, 1972). This suggests that neuritogenesis,
spinogenesis, and/or synaptogenesis assays performed
using cortical cultures might have value for identifying
psychoplastogens and fast-acting antidepressants. It should
be noted that our structural plasticity studies performed in vitro
utilized neurons exposed to psychedelics for extended periods
of time. Because brain exposure to these compounds is often
of short duration due to rapid metabolism, it will be interesting
to assess the kinetics of psychedelic-induced plasticity.
A key question in the field of psychedelic medicine has been
whether or not psychedelics promote changes in the density of
dendritic spines (Kyzar et al., 2017). Using super-resolution
SIM, we clearly demonstrate that psychedelics do, in fact, increase
the density of dendritic spines on cortical neurons, an effect
that is not restricted to a particular structural class of compounds.
Using DMT, we verified that cortical neuron spine
density increases in vivo and that these changes in structural
plasticity are accompanied by functional effects such as
increased amplitude and frequency of spontaneous EPSCs.

We specifically designed these experiments
to mimic previous studies of ketamine
(Li et al., 2010) so that we might
directly compare these two compounds,
and, to a first approximation, they appear
to be remarkably similar. Not only do they
both increase spine density and neuronal
excitability in the cortex, they seem to
have similar behavioral effects. We have
shown previously that, like ketamine,
DMT promotes fear extinction learning
and has antidepressant effects in the
forced swim test (Cameron et al., 2018). These results, coupled
with the fact that ayahuasca, a DMT-containing concoction, has
potent antidepressant effects in humans (Oso´ rio et al., 2015;
Sanches et al., 2016; Santos et al., 2007), suggests that classical
psychedelics and ketamine might share a related therapeutic
mechanism.
Although the molecular targets of ketamine and psychedelics
are different (NMDA and 5-HT2A receptors, respectively), they
appear to cause similar downstream effects on structural plasticity
by activating mTOR. This finding is significant because ketamine is
known to be addictive whereas many classical psychedelics are
not (Nutt et al., 2007, 2010). The exact mechanisms by which these
compounds stimulate mTOR is still not entirely understood, but
our data suggest that, at least for classical psychedelics, TrkB
and 5-HT2A receptors are involved. Although most classical psychedelics
are not considered to be addictive, there are still significant
safety concerns with their use in medicine because they
cause profound perceptual disturbances and still have the potential
to be abused. Therefore, the identification of non-hallucinogenic
analogs capable of promoting plasticity in the PFC could
facilitate a paradigm shift in our approach to treating neuropsychiatric
diseases. Moreover, such compounds could be critical to
resolving the long-standing debate in the field concerning whether
the subjective effects of psychedelics are necessary for their therapeutic
effects (Majic et al., 2015  ). Although our group is actively
investigating the psychoplastogenic properties of non-hallucinogenic
analogs of psychedelics, others have reported the therapeutic
potential of safer structural and functional analogs of ketamine
(Moskal et al., 2017; Yang et al., 2015; Zanos et al., 2016).
Our data demonstrate that classical psychedelics from several
distinct chemical classes are capable of robustly promoting the
growth of both neurites and dendritic spines in vitro, in vivo, and across species. Importantly, our studies highlight the similarities
between the effects of ketamine and those of classical serotonergic
psychedelics, supporting the hypothesis that the clinical
antidepressant and anxiolytic effects of these molecules might
result from their ability to promote structural and functional plasticity
in prefrontal cortical neurons. We have demonstrated that
the plasticity-promoting properties of psychedelics require
TrkB, mTOR, and 5-HT2A signaling, suggesting that these key
signaling hubs may serve as potential targets for the development
of psychoplastogens, fast-acting antidepressants, and anxiolytics.
Taken together, our results suggest that psychedelics
may be used as lead structures to identify next-generation neurotherapeutics
with improved efficacy and safety profiles.

Also below is a great article on DMT and neuroplasticity:

 

Dark Classics in Chemical Neuroscience N,N-Dimethyltryptamine DMT

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Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic that acts on the central nervous system by antagonizing the n-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. It is a rapid acting anti-depressant, but there is a lot more attention being paid to it’s efficacy in alcohol and drug abuse treatment.

Ketamine has been shown in some studies to prolong abstinence from alcohol and drug use disorders. It also has been found to reduce cocaine craving and self-administration in untreated patients.

The mechanisms by which this works has been through the disruption of relevant neural networks which blocks reconciliation of drug-related memories, neuroplasticity and neurogenesis, and enhancing psychological therapy.

We know that addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder with cravings, drug seeking, and unpleasant withdrawal symptoms upon cessation of the drug. Relapse rates with current therapies are between 40-80%.

Pre-clinical research on Ketamine has shown effectiveness in alcohol intake in a rat model:

Alcohol-preferring rats could self-administer
0.08% weight/volume saccharin, 10% weight/volume ethanol or
water. After intraperitoneal administration of either ketamine or
memantine, operant responding and motor activity were assessed.
A dose of 20 mg/kg of ketamine reduced ethanol administration
significantly (33.3% less than vehicle-treated rats) without affecting
motor activity and water consumption. Importantly, coadministration
of rapamycin blocked ketamine-mediated reduction
of alcohol intake, but not that of memantine (Sabino et al.,
2013). Similarly, ketamine’s antidepressant effects are suppressed
by rapamycin. mTOR activation is required for the anti-alcohol effect of ketamine, but not memantine, in alcohol-preferring rats

Also:

Both ketamine and NBQX attenuate alcohol drinking in male Wistar rats.

The devastating consequences of alcohol-use disorder (AUD) on the individual and the society are well established. Current treatments of AUD encompass various strategies, all of which have only modest effectiveness. Hence, there is a critical need to develop more efficacious therapies. Recently, specific glutamatergic receptors have been identified as potential novel targets for intervention in AUD. Thus, the current study was designed to evaluate the effects of acute administration of sub-anesthetic doses of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, as well as NBQX, an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist on alcohol intake and its possible behavioural consequences. Adult male Wistar rats were trained in drinking in dark paradigm (3 weeks), and following stable alcohol intake, ketamine, NBQX as well as their combination were injected prior to a 90 min drinking session. In addition to alcohol intake, sucrose preference (overnight), and locomotor activity and forced swim test (FST) were also evaluated before and following alcohol intake. Both doses of ketamine (5 and 10 mg/kg) and NBQX (5 and 10 mg/kg) significantly attenuated percent alcohol intake. The combination of the higher dose of ketamine and NBQX, however, did not significantly affect percent alcohol intake. Moreover, animals exposed to alcohol showed decreased sucrose intake (reflective of anhedonia), decreased locomotor activity and swimming in the FST (reflective of helplessness), that were not affected by ketamine and/or NBQX. These results suggest that selective antagonism of the NMDA or AMPA/kainate receptors may be of therapeutic potential in AUD.

Addiction is characterised by disruptions in learning and memory. Addicts develop cue-specific responses to drug-related
cues. One preclinical study examined the effects of ketamine administration on reconsolidation
where memories are rendered more labile following reactivation. After morphine CPP ( conditioned place preference) was induced, rats were intraperitoneally administered 60 mg/kg of ketamine after being reexposed to the conditioned context or while they were in their home cages. After ketamine administration, preference for morphine decreased significantly in the first retest.  This has been interpreted as evidence that ketamine successfully disrupted reconsolidation of the environment-drug memory.

Effects of scopolamine and ketamine on reconsolidation of morphine conditioned place preference in rats

Persistent memory associated with addictive drugs contributes to the relapse of drug abuse. The current study was conducted to examine the effects of scopolamine and ketamine on reconsolidation of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP). In experiment 1, after morphine CPP was acquired, rats were injected with ketamine (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and scopolamine (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), respectively, after reexposure to an earlier morphine-paired context or in their home cages. The CPP was reassessed 24 and 48 h after reexposure. An additional group of rats received saline following reexposure to the earlier morphine-paired context. In experiment 2, two groups of rats were only given saline during the CPP training and subsequent administration of ketamine or scopolamine during the reexposure. In experiment 1, rats failed to exhibit morphine CPP when ketamine and scopolamine were administered only after reexposure to a morphine-paired context. CPP was not abolished by ketamine or scopolamine administration in the animals’ home cages. Also, the animals receiving only saline injections showed strong morphine CPP 24 h after a short exposure to the morphine-paired context. In experiment 2, ketamine or scopolamine treatment alone did not induce CPP or aversion. Administration of scopolamine and ketamine, after reexposure to a drug-paired context, resulted in the disruption of morphine CPP, suggesting the potential effects of scopolamine and ketamine in disrupting memory associated with environmental cues and addictive drugs.

The capacity of ketamine to treat addiction was not investigated scientifically until decades later when Krupitsky and
Grinenko (1997), published work that reported the use of ketamineto reduce relapse in recently detoxified alcoholics. These
published results were a review of 10 years of previous research.The procedure that was investigated was referred to as Ketamine Psychedelic Therapy (KPT) and had been applied since the mid-80sin the former Soviet Union, until ketamine was banned in Russia 1998.  Ten Year Study of Ketamine Psychedelic Therapy (KPT) of Alcohol Dependence [

KPT consisted of three stages. The first step was the preparation,during which patients underwent a preliminary psychotherapy session where a psychotherapist discussed with them the content of the psychedelic experience. They were told that under the influence of ketamine, they would view the world symbolically, realise about the negative aspects of alcohol dependence and see the positive sides of sobriety. They were also told that they would become aware of unconscious mental concepts about the negative aspects of their addiction, such as their personal problems and their self-identity. These insights would help them to accept new life values, purposes and meaning of life and in turn e to overcome
their alcoholism. The second stage was the ketamine session in which ketamine was intramuscularly injected and the psychotherapist interacted with the patient. The psychotherapist verbally guided the patient, with the aim of creating new meaning and purpose in life. At moments of highly intense psychedelic experience, the smell of alcohol was introduced to the individuals. The idea was to enhance the negative emotional valence of the thoughts related to alcohol during the session. Finally, group psychotherapy was performed after the session. The aim of this session was to help patients integrate
insights of psychedelic experience into their lives. It is reported that this procedure was used in
over 1000 alcoholics with no reported complications.In Krupitsky and Grinenko, 1997 report, relapse rates in a group
of recently detoxified alcohol dependent patients undergoing KPT (n ¼ 111) were compared with another group of alcohol dependent patients who were treated with treatment as usual (n ¼ 100). Both groups underwent alcohol detoxification before treatment. After these sessions, the KPT group received an intramuscular injection of ketamine (2.5 mg/kg) along with the corresponding preparation. The control group received ‘conventional, standard methods of treatment’ in the same hospital. Only 24% of the control group remained abstinent after a year, whereas 66% of the KPT group did not relapse during the same period (p < .01).

In a further study, 70 detoxified heroin-dependent patients were randomised into two KPT groups, who were injected different doses of ketamine, in a double-blind manner (Krupitsky et al., 2002). One group (n ¼ 35) received 0.2 mg/kg i.m. of ketamine, which was considered an active placebo, whereas the experimental group (n ¼ 35) received 2.0 mg/kg i.m. After two years, the higher dose of ketamine resulted in a greater rate of abstinence (17% vs 2% abstinent subjects, p < .05). Additionally, the experimental group had a larger positive change in nonverbal unconscious emotional attitudes and a greater and longer-lasting reduction in craving for heroin. The authors therefore concluded that effectiveness of ketamine
was dose dependent. Ketamine psychotherapy for heroin addiction: immediate effects and two-year follow-up

In 2007, Krupitsky’s lab compared the impact of a single vs three KPT sessions (dose: 2.0 mg/kg, i.m.) (Krupitsky et al., 2007). Fifty nine detoxified heroin dependent patients first received a KPT session. After this, 6 participants relapsed and abandoned the treatment. The remaining participants were randomised into two groups: one received a further two KPT sessions (n ¼ 26) in monthly intervals, whereas the other underwent two counseling sessions (n ¼ 27) also in monthly intervals. After a year, 50% in the 3-session KPT group remained abstinent compared to 22% in the single KPT (p < .05) (Krupitsky et al., 2007). This clearly demonstrates the superior efficacy of three KPT sessions in comparison to
one KPT session, which indicates that the KPT sessions are beneficial.  Single Versus Repeated Sessions of Ketamine-Assisted Psychotherapy for People with Heroin Dependence 

In a private psychiatric practice in the US, another psychiatrist has successfully conducted KPT since 1994. He has not only treated patients with drug addiction, but also individuals with other types of addictions (e.g. food addiction) and other psychological disorders. His reported anecdotal, clinical findings are positive, having adhered strictly to the original protocol.  Ketamine Enhanced Psychotherapy: Preliminary Clinical Observations on Its Effectiveness in Treating Alcoholism. Kolp, Eli,Friedman, Harris L.,Young, M. Scott,Krupitsky, Evgeny The Humanistic Psychologist, Vol 34(4), 2006, 399-422

Abstract:

Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic widely used by physicians in the United States and also a psychedelic drug that physicians can legally prescribe off-label within the United States for other therapeutic purposes. It has been used in Russia and elsewhere to successfully treat alcoholism and other psychological or psychiatric problems, but has not been researched for this purpose in the United States. Results of a series of clinical trials using ketamine for treating alcoholism in the United States are retrospectively reported, along with 2 case studies of how psychotherapy facilitated by this substance helped two individuals achieve abstinence through ketamine’s transpersonal effects. Considering the massive problems caused by alcoholism, the need to begin formal research studies on ketamine psychotherapy for alcoholism is emphasized.

In 2014, 8 cocaine dependent males disinterested in treatment received 3 infusions in a double-blind, cross-over design: 0.41 mg/ kg ketamine, 0.71 mg/kg ketamine, and 2 mg lorazepam (an active benzodiazepine control, which induces mild subjective and anxiolytic effects) (Dakwar et al., 2014b). Infusions lasted 52 min and were separated by 48 h. Before and after each infusion, motivation to quit cocaine and cue-induced craving were assessed. Relative to the lorazepam, motivation to quit cocaine was enhanced and cueinduced craving for cocaine was reduced by the 0.4 mg/kg ketamine (both ps ¼ 0.012), and this latter effect was augmented by the 0.71 mg/kg ketamine dose. During the psychedelic experience,
dissociation and mystical-type effects were assessed. As predicted, the higher dose of ketamine led to greater mystical experiences. Strikingly, these mystical-type experiences, but not the dissociative effects, were found to mediate motivation to quit. However, the small non-treatment-seeking sample, the absence of an inactive placebo and the cross-over design, limit the results.Having said that, the participants showed a significant reduction in the frequency and amount of cocaine
consumed in normal life in the 4 weeks following the experiment, compared to baseline. Dakwar, E., Levin, F., Foltin, R.W., Nunes, E.V., Hart, C.L., 2014b. The effects of subanesthetic ketamine infusions on motivation to quit and cue-induced craving in cocaine-dependent research volunteers. Biol. Psychiatry 76, 40e46. https://doi. org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2013.08.009.

Also, more cocaine research from the same group is here:

Cocaine self-administration disrupted by the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine: a randomized, crossover trial E DakwarMolecular Psychiatry volume22pages76–81 (2017) |

Abstract:

Repeated drug consumption may progress to problematic use by triggering neuroplastic adaptations that attenuate sensitivity to natural rewards while increasing reactivity to craving and drug cues. Converging evidence suggests a single sub-anesthetic dose of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine may work to correct these neuroadaptations and restore motivation for non-drug rewards. Using an established laboratory model aimed at evaluating behavioral shifts in the salience of cocaine now vs money later, we found that ketamine, as compared to the control, significantly decreased cocaine self-administration by 67% relative to baseline at greater than 24 h post-infusion, the most robust reduction observed to date in human cocaine users and the first to involve mechanisms other than stimulant or dopamine agonist effects. These findings signal new directions in medication development for substance use disorders.

Neural plasticity is defined as the cellular and structural reorganisation
of the brain. Synaptogenesis is a crucial mechanism for
plasticity, since for change to happen within brain circuitry new
synapses between neurons must be formed. Surface expression of
AMPARs and upregulation of other synaptic proteins are involved in
the process of synaptogenesis. Diminished glutamatergic synaptic
transmission and reduced plasticity are thought to be associated
with addiction. Existing models suggest that ketamine’s blockade of NMDA receptors
increases synaptogenesis by stimulating protein synthesis
and the insertion of AMPA receptors. Hence, ketamine’s
effects help to reverse the glutamatergic changes associated
with depression and addiction. 

Animal models of addiction, depression and other psychiatric disorders
have been linked to a reduction in adult neurogenesis . It has been suggested that in addiction
the loss of neurogenesis, especially in cortical and hippocampal
regions, may contribute to levels of self-administration and the
vulnerability of relapsing. The reduction of neurogenesis in addiction is supported in
humans by the reduction in BDNF serum levels. In a study, 37
subjects with diagnosis of alcohol dependence showed significantly
reduced BDNF serum levels compared to healthy individuals
. Similarly, cocaine- and heroin-dependentpatients have significantly lower serum BDNF levels and these
seem to recover during withdrawal. Rapid and transient up-regulation of the neuroplasticity marker
BDNF is implicated as a critical component of the antidepressant
mechanism of ketamine . BDNF knock-out mice do not show anti-depressant response to
ketamine in animal models of depression.

Recent research has
demonstrated that ketamine increases peripheral plasma BDNF in
depressed people who respond to treatment but not in treatment
non-responders or patients receiving an active placebo. These BDNF increases in depressed people given ketamine
are robustly correlated with the drug’s antidepressant effects.

It has been found there is a dispersion in normal brain connectivity and the disruption of the usual pattern of communication  in depression and addictions. . The integrity of functional networks decreased, being the
change maximal in functional hubs such as the thalamus, putamen
and high-level association cortices. In particular, connectivity
within the Default Mode Network was reduced between the posterior
cingulate cortex and the mPFC .
The connectivity between the parahippocampal and the retrosplenial
cortex also decreased as well as the segregation between
other major functional networks such as the salience, attention and
different visual networks Infusions of ketamine have shown to decrease connectivity
between and within resting-state consciousness networks.
Connectivity between the mPFC and the rest of the Default
Mode Network (via the posterior cingulate cortex) has been found
to be reduced, along with the integrity and activity of the salience
and visual networks are also affected. Since it is known
that connectivity with the mPFC is elevated in depression , the reduction of connectivity in the Default Mode
Network observed during the psychedelic experience might be a
mechanism that helps treat depressive states, which are very
common in addicts and predictive of relapse.

Given addiction is highly co-morbid with depression   and ketamine’s role within psychiatry changed
dramatically when it was discovered to be an anti-depressant, we
now briefly describe the research concerning ketamine and
depression. In 2000, the first clinical trial hinted at the potential of
ketamine as a treatment for depression. Four subjects diagnosed
with depression were intravenously administered 0.5 mg/kg of
ketamine in a randomised, double-blind design. The results were
compared to the injection of saline solutions in 3 subjects with an
equivalent diagnosis. Comparison on the Hamilton Rating Scale for
Depression (HAM-D) showed moderate evidence for a greater
reduction in scores after ketamine infusion compared to saline
(Berman et al., 2000). The reduction was rapid and outlasted the
subjective effects of ketamine, lasting for 3 days after infusion.
Despite the small sample size and the limited follow-up, this result
and anti-depressant effects observed in animal models of depression
encouraged researchers in the field to perform more studies in humans . Since then, over 30 studies have
examined the antidepressants effects of ketamine in patients with
treatment-resistant major depressive and bipolar disorders.

Ketamine has shown a 65-70% response rate in treating
depression within 24 h, which contrasts with the ~47% response
rate of conventional monoaminergic antidepressants after weeks
or months . Furthermore,
ketamine’s antidepressant actions are almost immediate and last
for approximately a week ,
whereas conventional antidepressive medications take weeks to
have an effect, are given daily and most of them fail to exert long lasting
effects . Furthermore, studies
have consistently shown that after a ketamine infusion there is a
significant reduction in suicidal ideation which also lasts for several
days.Depression and addiction’s co-expression is almost ubiquitous
People with alcohol, opioids, cannabis and
cocaine use disorders show notably higher rates of depression than
the average of the general population. Furthermore, high levels of depression and anxiety
may predispose relapse to: heroin, alcohol, cannabis and cocaine.

Memories and their creation and alteration is felt to be at the heart of cues and triggers and relapse in addiction. Once consolidated, memories are thought to be stored in a
stabilised state after initial acquisition. Shortly after reactivation
(i.e. remembered) of consolidated memories, these are rendered
transiently unstable and labile, before they then re-stabilise. This
process has been named reconsolidation . After reconsolidation,
the memories are stored again, but they may have been slightly
altered or updated. Each time memories are reactivated the latest
version is retrieved and they are again susceptible to change. During reconsolidation memories may be vulnerable to
manipulation and disruption. This was first demonstrated in animals
using fear conditioning. Rodents were trained to associate a
neutral stimulus with a shock such that the neutral stimulus elicited
a fear response. Researchers eliminated this fear response by
pharmacologically disrupting the reconsolidation process . Reward memories can also be disrupted such that a
neutral stimulus that once elicited appetitive behaviour no longer
does so. Therefore, non-pharmacological and drug therapies that
aim at weakening drug-cue memories via manipulation of reconsolidation
are of interest. Preclinical studies have shown that ketamine affects reconsolidation
of drug memories. . A recent review has suggested that ketamine (along with other psychedelics)
may be able to disrupt maladaptive appetitive memories
(Fattore et al., 2017).  Psychedelics and reconsolidation of traumatic and appetitive maladaptive memories: focus on cannabinoids and ketamine

Article ABSTRACT:

Rationale

Clinical data with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients recently stimulated interest on the potential therapeutic use of psychedelics in disorders characterized by maladaptive memories, including substance use disorders (SUD). The rationale for the use of MDMA in PTSD and SUD is being extended to a broader beneficial “psychedelic effect,” which is supporting further clinical investigations, in spite of the lack of mechanistic hypothesis. Considering that the retrieval of emotional memories reactivates specific brain mechanisms vulnerable to inhibition, interference, or strengthening (i.e., the reconsolidation process), it was proposed that the ability to retrieve and change these maladaptive memories might be a novel intervention for PTSD and SUD. The mechanisms underlying MDMA effects indicate memory reconsolidation modulation as a hypothetical process underlying its efficacy.

Objective

Mechanistic and clinical studies with other two classes of psychedelic substances, namely cannabinoids and ketamine, are providing data in support of a potential use in PTSD and SUD based on the modulation of traumatic and appetitive memory reconsolidation, respectively. Here, we review preclinical and clinical data on cannabinoids and ketamine effects on biobehavioral processes related to the reconsolidation of maladaptive memories.

Results

We report the findings supporting (or not) the working hypothesis linking the potential therapeutic effect of these substances to the underlying reconsolidation process. We also proposed possible approaches for testing the use of these two classes of drugs within the current paradigm of reconsolidation memory inhibition.

Furthermore, a meta-analysis of pre-clinical
studies found evidence suggesting that NMDAR antagonists can
be used to target reward memory reconsolidation, and more successfully
than adrenergic antagonists such as propranolol (Das
et al., 2013)  Das, R.K., Freeman, T.P., Kamboj, S.K., 2013. The effects of N-methyl d-aspartate and B-adrenergic receptor antagonists on the reconsolidation of reward memory: a meta-analysis. Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 37, 240-255.:

Abstract

Pharmacological memory reconsolidation blockade provides a potential mechanism for ameliorating the maladaptive reward memories underlying relapse in addiction. Two of the most promising classes of drug that interfere with reconsolidation and have translational potential for human use are N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and B-Adrenergic receptor (B-AR) antagonists. We used meta-analysis and meta-regression to assess the effects of these drugs on the reconsolidation of reward memory in preclinical models of addiction. Pharmacokinetic, mnemonic and methodological factors were assessed for their moderating impact on effect sizes. An analysis of 52 independent effect sizes (NMDAR = 30, B-AR = 22) found robust effects of both classes of drug on memory reconsolidation, but a far greater overall effect of NMDAR antagonism than B-AR antagonism. Significant moderating effects of drug dose, relapse process and primary reinforcer were found. The findings suggest that reward memory reconsolidation can be robustly targeted by NMDAR antagonists and to a lesser extent, by B-AR antagonists. Implications for future clinical work are discussed.

Highlights

► Meta-analysis of NMDAR and B-adrenergic antagonists in preclinical reward reconsolidation. ► Larger effects of NMDAR (r = .613) than B-adrenergic (r = .24) antagonists were found. ► ‘Relapse process’, trace type, reinforcer and drug dose moderated effect sizes. ► NMDAR antagonists particularly might be of clinical use in treating addiction.

 

.

                           Mystical experiences and psychedelic effects

Mystical experiences and psychedelic effects provoked by
classic psychedelic drugs have been shown to be psychologically
beneficial in long-term studies.They have not only been linked with positive
outcomes in various treatments, but also to ‘life-changing’,
‘spiritually meaningful’ and ‘eye opening’ events.In the ketamine studies described
above, anecdotal and qualitative reports suggest that the subjective
psychedelic experience seemed to help patients. For example, to
help them: undergo a cathartic process, improve relationships with
the world and other people, maintain positive psychological
changes and enhance self-awareness and personal growth.During KPT, patients reported a feeling of ‘resolution’ and
‘catharsis’ of some psychological problems, mainly those related to
alcohol. Furthermore, the degree of mystical experience was also
linked to the insight and impact of KPT reported by patients
. Interestingly, the intensity of the negative experiences (experiences associated
with negative emotions, fear and horror) during the
ketamine session was associated with longer remission. This was
blindly and quantitatively assessed by analysing patient’s selfreports.
Moreover, spirituality, self-concept, emotional attitudes
to other people and positive changes in life values and purposes
were improved after the ketamine experience.

Notably, ketamine’s mystical experiences, but not dissociative
effects, were found to mediate ketamine’s increase motivation to
quit 24 h after the infusion in cocaine addicts .
Moreover, consistent with previous studies, it was also observed
that mystical experiences were positively dose-dependent. This
study therefore provides evidence that the mystical experience
induced by ketamine is important in its therapeutic mechanism
. Speculatively, mystical experiences may help
to rapidly shift patients’ mindsets towards the integration and
acceptance of a sober lifestyle.

The acute disruptions of the functional networks, especially the
alterations to the default mode network, are related to the psychedelic
experience. In fact, the degree of network dissolution in
LSD and psilocybin is correlated with the intensity of the psychedelic
experience . The disruption to the default mode network may engender a reduction
in rumination and maladaptive repetitive thoughts. Psychological
therapies for addiction often aim to help the patient consider
different ways of life, especially those without the drug, and a
pharmacological agent such as ketamine which expedites that
process may be useful in treating addiction.

Speculatively, ketamine can
provide a unique mental state during and after acute drug effects
that facilitates and enriches therapeutic experiences, which in turn
may improve efficacy and lengthen treatment effects. Furthermore, synaptogenesis
and neurogenesis are putatively critical in learning new
information . The uptake of psychological therapy may
therefore be facilitated after ketamine infusions due increases in
synaptogenesis and neurogenesis, and thus improved learning of
relapse-reducing strategies, such as those used in relapseprevention
based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). In fact, the
idea that neurogenesis and synaptogenesis work synergistically
with psychological therapies is becoming recognised as a new
approach in the treatment of mental disorders . Theoretically, the administration of ketamine (which can
produce a ‘psychedelic’ experience) may open people’s minds so
they are more able to embrace what is presented during therapy as
well as enhancing the uptake of new therapeutic content.

The promise of ketamine in the treatment of addiction is supported
by research with large treatment effect sizes, especially in
comparison to existing treatments. In recently detoxified alcoholics,
ketamine treatment increased one-year abstinence rates in
alcoholics from 24% in the control to 66% in the ketamine group
(Krupitsky and Grinenko, 1997) and reduced cocaine self administration
by 67% relative to baseline in non-treatment
seeking cocaine users (Dakwar et al., 2016). These results clearly
demonstrate profound effects of ketamine administration (with
and without therapy) on drug and alcohol use, of an order of
magnitude which is 2 or 3 times more effective than existing
pharmacotherapies.

Ketamine for the treatment of addiction Evidence and potential mechanisms

 

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Ask The Doctor: “Ketamine For Depression: Progress And Pitfalls” With Dr. Cristina Cusin, M.D.  < Webinar Link

Old Club Drug Is Repurposed Into Depression Treatment

A North Texas woman said a popular club drug and animal tranquilizer saved her from a life of depression and suicidal thoughts.

You may have heard of the drug before, as Special K on the street. it was designed as a horse tranquilizer, but Ketamine is gaining popularity as a treatment for depression.

Some doctors believe the controversial drug will become a game-changer in slowing the nation’s suicide epidemic.

Tiffany McCombie, a 40-year-old mother of one, knows what depression feels like in its darkest moments.

“I definitely was feeling what I would consider suicidal, not really wanting to live, not really wanting to die, just numb. That’s not a healthy place for me,” McCombie said.

She said she has lived with depression and Bipolar disorder for 30 years, has tried dozens of medications and supplements to combat it, but nothing, she said, has worked as well as the Ketamine infusions she gets at Rise Wellness Center.

She’s had six of them in ten months.”I had the right attitude and wanted to be healed and believing that it was going to happen for me and my brain. It happened. It cut down the mood stabilizers and antidepressants I had been on for years. I don’t take them at all,” she said.

More studies,like this one, are finding that Ketamine may be more effective and work faster than traditional antidepressants.

A local team of anesthesiologists had used the drug before, as an anaesthetic inside the operating room, but after seeing its potential to treat depression, they opened Rise Wellness Center, which specializes in Ketamine infusions.

“We get people that are so far down and so dark that we need this to get them out, to get them up, to get them moving. No drug does that like Ketamine,” said Dr.  Renaud Rodrigue, a pain management physician at Rise Wellness Center.

Experts say Ketamine can be dangerous, even deadly, if abused or taken in large doses.

Even though it’s not FDA-approved to treat depression, Dr. Rodrigue said, when given in small doses and in a clinical setting, 90 percent of his patients with severe depression reported long-term benefits.

Researchers at the University of Illinois published this study about how Ketamine may trigger a depression-fighting protein in the brain.

“This protein changed the game for us. We know now there’s something that is created just by the drug itself, which is staying in the central nervous system and is exerting this affect way beyond the duration of the drug,” said Dr. Rodrigue.

McCombie said Ketamine saved her life.

Could Ketamine conquer Treatment resistant depression?

A notorious drug that can cause dangerous hallucinations and even death when abused may be the key to treating severely depressed patients when used under proper physician care. UT Southwestern’s Dr. Lisa Monteggia has uncovered how the drug Ketamine works so rapidly and why patients are seeing success when other treatments have failed.

Transcript

{Video opens with music and pictures of UTSW patient Megan Joyce along with her mother and with her husband.}

Megan Joyce: Everything in my life seems great.

Narrator: Megan Joyce’s life may look picture perfect.

Megan: I graduated college. I got married. He’s an amazing person. He is incredibly supportive.

Narrator: But what these happy photos hide is a relentless inner struggle.

Megan: This is not something that I love to admit, but I fight for my life every single day.

Narrator: The 27-year-old has spent more than a decade battling severe depression. It triggers for no obvious reason.

Megan: They have defined my bipolar illness as treatment resistant.

Narrator: She says she tried every medication in the books … as well as checking into inpatient and outpatient treatment centers. Nothing worked. Until doctors at UT Southwestern Medical Center tried something bold. Ketamine infusion therapy.

Megan: I don’t know if I would be here without the Ketamine treatment. I drive from Austin every 10 days, and I come for treatment, and I’m in the hospital for about 5 hours, and then I go home the same day.

Narrator: Several studies show ketamine can quickly stabilize severely depressed patients. But it does come with risks.

Dr. Madhukar Trivedi: There is a risk for addiction so that if people start taking Ketamine on their own on the black market, then that can be very dangerous. There are toxic effects in the brain if you overdose. On the other hand, for patients who do well on this and are getting the right dose under the guidance of a physician, it can be life saving.

Megan: When I have the IV in, it’s for 40 minutes, and then I stay for 2 hours after because it is an anesthetic so they want to make sure you don’t have adverse side effects.

Narrator: Dr. Madukhar Trivedi is closely monitoring Joyce … as well as the work his colleagues are doing at the bench.

Dr. Trivedi: At UT Southwestern, we have the whole breadth of work being done. There are people working like Dr. Monteggia in basic research. Understanding the exact mechanism of how Ketamine changes molecularly and changes the mechanism of action.

Dr. Lisa Monteggia: We got involved with how Ketamine triggers an anti-depressant effect because of the real need. Some of the recent clinical data has really shown that about a third of all patients don’t respond to anti-depressants. So, what do you do for treatment for those individuals?

Narrator: UT Southwestern’s Dr. Lisa Monteggia is a neuroscientist whose lab pinpointed a key protein that helps tigger Ketamine’s rapid antidepressent effects in the brain. Whereas traditional antidepressents can take up to 8 weeks to work, the effects of ketamine are seen within 60 to 90 minutes.

Dr. Monteggia: The idea of trying to understand how you generate a rapid anti-depressant response in patients … it’s really the first time we’ve been able to study it.

Narrator: Her study, published in the prestigious journal Nature, shows that ketamine blocks a protein responsible for a range of normal brain functions.

Dr. Monteggia: How we think Ketamine triggers an anti-depressant effect, this blocking the NMDA receptor, we think may also be causing the side effects associated with Ketamine. One of the things we’re working on is to try and see if we can identify compounds, slight derivatives perhaps, that may have the beneficial effects of Ketamine, in terms of triggering anti-depressant effects, without the side effects.

Narrator: In the meantime, Joyce remains optimistic for her future and the millions of others trying to defeat depression.

Megan: That’s why I really sought out Ketamine is I really wanted to give back and just have a chance at a semi-normal life.

Depression Patients Turning to Local Doctor’s Ketamine Therapy

The deaths of designer Kate Spade on Tuesday and TV Chef Anthony Bourdain Friday morning are bringing new attention to depression and suicide.

A new Center for Disease Control and Prevention report reveals suicide rates have risen 30 percent across much of the country since 1999.

But right here in San Diego, there is hope for a category of patients some doctors call “the untreatable.”

This patient, we’ll call Lisa, is composing a letter to the editor about her 20-year fight to stay alive.

“I know how tall the bridge is. I know how many seconds it takes to land,” Lisa said.

Lisa is an attorney with severe depression. Conventional medicines could not suppress her suicidal thoughts.

“It’s awful,” she said. “The day starts with waking up thinking ‘Can I even get out of bed?’ You just fight it to exhaustion every single day.”

She was referred to Dr. David Feifel who NBC 7 first also spoke to three years ago. Patients travel from as far away as Canada to undergo his Ketamine therapy.

“Sort of a psychedelic experience. It’s also been termed dissociative experience because it is sort of an out-of-body feeling,” Dr. Feifel said of his therapy.

Dr. Feifel says low doses of Ketamine have an almost immediate effect on his patients, unlike conventional anti-depressants that can take weeks to build up a therapeutic level.

While Ketamine doesn’t stay in the body more than a day, its effects can last for months.

“It seems to be able to vaporize people’s sense of wanting to take their life.” Dr. Feifel said.

Lisa has received some 35 treatments over the last four months.

“I walk in here crappy, I’ll leave happy. It is a remarkable, remarkable experience that in 20 years nothing has ever come close” Lisa said.

Her goal is to need fewer treatments and experience longer-lasting effects.

Lisa’s hope for the so-called “untreatable community” of depressed people is they find help.

Ketamine-Associated Brain Changes – A Review of the Neuroimaging Literature

KEY POINTS:

                  Ketamine-Associated Brain Changes: A Review of the Neuroimaging Literature

Subanesthetic doses of ketamine have rapid (within hours), robust (across a variety of symptoms), and relatively sustained (typically up to one week) antidepressant effects—even in patients with TRD (treatment resistant depression). Clinical studies show that about 50% of patients with TRD have a significant decrease in symptoms within 24 hours of a single intravenous subanesthetic ketamine dose.

Animal models show that ketamine’s antidepressant effects are likely mediated by its antagonism of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors through increased α-amino-3-hydroxy-5- methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)–mediated glutamatergic signaling. This triggers activation of intracellular synaptogenic pathways, most notably in the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR)–signaling pathway, which also has implications in many other psychiatric disorders.

With regard to MDD patients, decreased glutamate has been noted in various prefrontal regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), dorsomedial PFC (dmPFC), and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), when compared to controls.8–10 This shortage of glutamate makes ketamine an ideal treatment for MDD; by creating a surge in glutamate levels in regions of the brain that suffer from a glutamate deficit, ketamine may provide some normalization of glutamate levels in patients with MDD. This “glutamate surge” hypothesis has dominated as the primary theory of ketamine’s antidepressant mechanism.

Ketamine may work through additional receptors, as it is known to have effects on several opioid receptors, adrenergic receptors, and several serotonin and norepinephrine transporters.17–19 It is also possible that acute dissociative side effects of ketamine may be mediating antidepressant response.

One salient biological metric that may provide insight into ketamine’s mechanism of action is related to dissociation. Dissociative side effects begin from infusion, reach a peak typically within an hour of infusion, and are completely diminished 230 minutes after infusion.20 The same study has shown that increased dissociation and psychotomimetic symptoms immediately following infusion may predict antidepressant response. (Luckenbaugh DA, Niciu MJ, Ionescu DF, et al. Do the dissociative side effects of ketamine mediate its antidepressant effects? J Affect Disord 2014;159:56–61Do the dissociative side effects of ketamine mediate its antidepressant effects.)

Certain themes have emerged with Ketamine. First are our findings of convergent brain regions implicated in MDD and how ketamine modulates those areas. Specifically, the subgenual ACC has been a region of interest in many previous studies. In relation to emotion and cognition, ketamine appears to reduce brain activation in regions associated with self-monitoring, to increase neural regions associated with emotional blunting, and to increase neural activity in reward processing.

Overall, ketamine’s effects were most notably found in the subgenual ACC, PCC, PFC, and hippocampus. Abnormalities in overlapping regions (specifically, the dorsal and subgenual ACC, amygdala, hippocampus, and ventral striatum) have been implicated, via a growing body of neuroimaging literature, in the pathophysiology of depression.  The subgenual ACC, in particular, has been a frequently studied area of interest concerning ketamine and MDD.

FMRI found significant reductions in subgenual ACC coupling with hippocampus, retrosplenial cortex, and thalamus. Immediate reductions in subgenual ACC blood flow and focal reductions in OFC blood flow strongly predicted dissociation.

NIMH studies using PET 120 minutes postinfusion found that increased metabolism in the subgenual ACC was positively correlated with improvements in depression scores post-ketamine. (Neural correlates of rapid antidepressant response to ketamine in bipolar disorder..)

Analysis of resting-state scans in healthy volunteers further suggests that dissociation may be responsible for ketamine’s antidepressant effects because it may disconnect the “excessive effects of an aversive visceromotor state on cognition and the self”—a hallmark of depression.40(p 163) Related, one study found that ketamine may dampen brain regions involved in rumination (the repetitive focusing of attention on negative feelings and thoughts in response to negative mood) by reducing the functional connectivity between the pregenual ACC and the dorsal PCC, and decreasing connectivity between the left and right executive-control networks.  (. Lehmann M, Seifritz E, Henning A, et al. Differential effects of rumination and distraction on ketamine induced modulation of resting state functional connectivity and reactivity of regions within the default-mode network. Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 2016;11:1227–35 .Differential effects of rumination and distraction on ketamine induced modulation of resting state functional connectivity and reactivity of regions within the default-mode network.)

Taken together, these studies suggest that ketamine may cause a “disconnect” in several circuits related to affective processing, perhaps by shifting focus of attention away from the internal states of anxiety, depression, and somatization, and more toward the perceptual changes (e.g., hallucinations, visual distortions, derealization) induced by ketamine. Similarly, during an emotion task, ketamine attenuated responses to negative pictures, suggesting that the processing of negative information is specifically altered in response to ketamine. (Scheidegger M, Henning A, Walter M, et al. Ketamine administration reduces amygdalo-hippocampal reactivity to emotional stimulation. Hum Brain Mapp 2016;37:1941–52.Ketamine administration reduces amygdalo‐hippocampal reactivity to emotional stimulation)

By taking the focus off “oneself” and placing it on other stimuli, it is possible that ketamine decreases awareness of negative experiences and consequently improves mood.

Perhaps most interesting are ketamine’s effects on brain connectivity as it relates to self-monitoring behaviors. Reduced connectivity between the pregenual ACC and dorsal PCC was associated with increased dissociation during infusion, and reduced activation in the left superior temporalcortex was associated with impaired self-monitoring56,65—which is disruptive to patients with psychotic illness—especially those with chronic symptoms of psychosis. By contrast, the transient dissociation experienced by depressed patients during a ketamine infusion may have the effect of dampening what the hyperactive self-monitoring associated with depressive illness (Lehmann M, Seifritz E, Henning A, et al. Differential effects of rumination and distraction on ketamine induced modulation of resting state functional connectivity and reactivity of regions within the default-mode network. Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 2016;11:1227–35Differential effects of rumination and distraction on ketamine induced modulation of resting state functional connectivity and reactivity of regions within the default-mode network. b)

During ketamine administration, subjects experience emotional blunting, which may be associated with reduced limbic responses to emotional stimuli.54,55 It is possible that by decreasing the activity of deep limbic structures (thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression, such as the amygdala), ketamine acutely disables the emotional resources required to perpetuate the symptoms of depression. (Abel KM, Allin MP, Kucharska-Pietura K, et al. Ketamine and fMRI BOLD signal: distinguishing between effects mediated by change in blood flow versus change in cognitive state. Hum Brain Mapp 2003;18:135–45. Ketamine and fMRI BOLD signal Distinguishing between effects mediated by change in blood flow versus change in cognitive state|||| Abel KM, Allin MP, Kucharska-Pietura K, et al. Ketamine alters neural processing of facial emotion recognition in healthy men: an fMRI study. Neuroreport 2003;14:387–91 Ketamine alters neural processing of facial emotion recognition in healthy men an fMRI study.)

Ketamine may play a role in reactivating reward areas of the brain in patients with MDD. This reactivation may be especially important, as reward areas in MDD have been characterized by decreased subcortical and limbic activity and by an increased cortical response to reward paradigms. (Zhang WN, Chang SH, Guo LY, Zhang KL, Wang J. The neural correlates of reward-related processing in major depressive disorder: a meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. J Affect Disord 2013;151:531–9.)

In resting-state scans, BOLD activation in the cingulate gyrus, hippocampus, insula, thalamus, and midbrain increased after ketamine.( Stone J, Kotoula V, Dietrich C, De Simoni S, Krystal JH, Mehta MA. Perceptual distortions and delusional thinking following ketamine administration are related to increased pharmacological MRI signal changes in the parietal lobe. J Psychopharmacol 2015;29:1025–8.Perceptual distortions and delusional thinking following ketamine administration are related to increased pharmacological MRI signal changes in the parietal lobe)

In addition, ketamine increases neural activation in the bilateral MCC, ACC, and insula, as well as the right thalamus.  Activation of these areas is consistent with activation of reward-processing areas, suggesting that ketamine may play a role in activating reward neurocircuitry. (Hoflich A, Hahn A, Kublbock M, et al. Ketamine-dependent neuronal activation in healthy volunteers. Brain Struct Funct 2017;222:1533–42.)

Though no single brain area has been singled out as the locus of depression, ketamine affects different areas of the brain in various ways, which may contribute to overall mood improvements. For example, at baseline, patients with MDD, compared to healthy volunteers, had reduced global connectivity in the PFC and increased connectivity in the posterior cingulate, precuneus, lingual gyrus, and cerebellum; postketamine, responders had increased connectivity in the lateral PFC, caudate, and insula. (Abdallah CG, Averill LA, Collins KA, et al. Ketamine treatment and global brain connectivity in major depression. Neuropsychopharmacology 2017;42:1210–9.Ketamine Treatment and Global Brain Connectivity in Major Depression.)

These findings may reflect ketamine’s ability to reclaim frontal control over deeper limbic structures, thus strengthening the cognitive control of emotions and decreasing depressive symptoms. Similarly, TRD patients, compared to healthy volunteers, had reduced insula and caudate responses to positive emotions at baseline, which normalized in the caudate post-ketamine. (Murrough JW, Collins KA, Fields J, et al. Regulation of neural responses to emotion perception by ketamine in individuals with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder. Transl Psychiatry 2015;5:e509 Regulation of neural responses to emotion perception by ketamine in individuals with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder.)

Improvements are correlated with increased metabolism in the hippocampus, dorsal ACC, and decreased metabolism in the OFC. (Lally N, Nugent AC, Luckenbaugh DA, Niciu MJ, Roiser JP, Zarate CA Jr. Neural correlates of change in major depressive disorder anhedonia following open-label ketamine. J Psychopharmacol 2015;29:596–607 Neural correlates of change in major depressive disorder anhedonia following open-label ketamine.)

Specifically, based on this review, future studies should likely focus on ketamine’s action in the subgenual ACC, PCC, PFC, and hippocampus. Another promising direction for research builds on the view that depression is the product of underactive prefrontal and limbic mood-regulation networks and overreactive subcortical limbic networks, which are involved in emotional and visceral responses. (Drevets WC, Price JL, Furey ML. Brain structural and functional abnormalities in mood disorders: implications for neurocircuitry models of depression. Brain Struct Funct 2008; 213:93–118 Brain structural and functional abnormalities in mood disorders.)

Ketamine’s potential use in both research and treatment is promising indeed.

 

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Ketamine and other N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists in the treatment of depression a perspective review

THE NEUROBIOLOGY OF ketamine and addiction

Psychedelic-Assisted Psychotherapy – A Paradigm Shift in Psychiatric Research and Development

KETAMINE FOR TREATMENT-RESISTANT UNIPOLAR AND BIPOLAR MAJOR DEPRESSION – CRITICAL REVIEW AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE.

Ketamine for the treatment of addiction Evidence and potential mechanisms  <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

REVIEW OF KETAMINE ABUSE AND DIVERSION

Cognitive behavior therapy may sustain antidepressant effects of intravenous ketamine in treatment-resistant depression

The Effect of a Single Dose of Intravenous Ketamine on suicidal ideation – systemic review and meta-analysis

Rapid-Acting Antidepressants Mechanistic Insights and Future Directions.

Ketamine and rapid-acting antidepressants a new era in the battle against depression and suicide.

Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Rapid-Acting Antidepressants Ketamine and Scopolamine

A Circadian Genomic Signature Common to Ketamine and Sleep Deprivation in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex

New Targets for Rapid Antidepressant Action

Role of copper in depression. Relationship with ketamine treatment

Ketamine normalizes brain activity during emotionally valenced attentional processing in depression.

Glutamate and Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Systems in the Pathophysiology of Major Depression and Antidepressant Response to Ketamine.

Recognizing Depression from the Microbiota⁻Gut⁻Brain Axis. b

Psychobiotics and the gut–brain axis in the pursuit of happines

Symptomatology and predictors of antidepressant efficacy in extended responders to a single ketamine infusion

Default Mode Connectivity in Major Depressive diosrder measured up to 10 days after Ketamine administration

S-Adenosyl Methionine and Transmethylation Pathways in Neuropsychiatric Diseases Throughout Life

S-Adenosyl Methionine in the Therapy of Depression and Other Psychiatric Disorders.

Ketamine for Depression, 2 Diagnostic and Contextual Indications.

Ketamine’s antidepressant efficacy is extended for at least four weeks in subjects with a family history of an alcohol use disorder

Predictors of Response to Ketamine in Treatment Resistant Major Depressive Disorder and Bipolar Disorder

The role of adipokines in the rapid antidepressant effects of ketamine.

response to ketamine and prediction of treatment outcome

What is the mechanism of Ketamine’s rapid‐onset antidepressant effect A concise overview of the surprisingly large number of possibilities

Medical comorbidity in bipolar disorder The link with metabolic-inflammatory systems.

Sterile Inflammation of Brain, due to Activation of Innate Immunity, as a Culprit in Psychiatric Disorders

Sterile Inflammation of Brain, due to Activation of Innate Immunity, as a Culprit in Psychiatric Disorders

Role of neuro-immunological factors in the pathophysiology of mood disorders.

Anti-inflammatory agents in the treatment of bipolar depression a systematic review and meta-analysis

The role of tryptophan metabolism and food craving in the relation between obesity and bipolar disorder

Immune-based strategies for mood disorders facts and challenges

Metabolic syndrome in psychiatric patients implications

Genetic Studies on the Tripartite Glutamate Synapse in the Pathophysiology and Therapeutics of Mood Disorders

The Impact of a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in SIGMAR1 on Depressive Symptoms in Major Depressive Disorder and Bipolar Disorder.

Case–control association study of 14 variants of CREB1, CREBBP and CREM on MDD and bipolar

Metabolic syndrome in psychiatric patients overview, mechanisms, and implications.

Peripheral inflammation, Physical Activity and Cognition in Bipolar Disorder

The putative role of oxidative stress and inflammation in the pathophysiology of sleep dysfunction across neuropsychiatruc disorders – chronic fatigue bipolar MS

Bipolar Disorder and Inflammation.

Pharmacologic implications of inflammatory comorbidity in bipolar disorder.

Minding the brain- the role of pharmacotherapy in substance-use disorder treatment

Molecular and Cellular Effects of Traumatic Stress Implications for PTSD

Synaptic Loss and the Pathophysiology of PTSD Implications for Ketamine as a Prototype Novel Therapeutic

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